MEXICO WANTS TO DECRIMINALIZE ALL DRUGS AND NEGOTIATE WITH THE U.S. TO DO THE SAME

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Mexico's president released a new plan last week that called for radical reform to the nation's drug laws and negotiating with the United States to take similar steps.

The plan put forward by the administration of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, often referred to by his initials as AMLO, calls for decriminalizing illegal drugs and transferring funding for combating the illicit substances to pay for treatment programs instead.

It points to the failure of the decades-long international war on drugs, and calls for negotiating with the international community, and specifically the U.S., to ensure the new strategy's success.

"The 'war on drugs' has escalated the public health problem posed by currently banned substances to a public safety crisis," the policy proposal, which came as part of AMLO's National Development Plan for 2019-2024, read. Mexico's current "prohibitionist strategy is unsustainable," it argued.

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Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers a speech at the Santa Lucia Air Force Base in Zumpango, near Mexico City, on April 29.

The plan put forward by the president’s administration calls for decriminalizing illegal drugs and transferring funding for combating the illicit substances to pay for treatment programs instead.

PEDRO PARDO/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
The document says that ending prohibition is "the only real possibility" to address the problem. "This should be pursued in a negotiated manner, both in the bilateral relationship with the United States and in the multilateral sphere, within the [United Nations] U.N.," it explained.

Drug reform advocates have welcomed AMLO's plan. Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, told Newsweek that the Mexican president's plan "reflects a shift in thinking on drug policy that is taking place around the world, including here in the U.S."