CELEBRITY  Published on May 19, 2021

10 photos of Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg’s California Home

Modest yet thrilling, Mark Zuckerberg’s penthouse is a treasure chest full of exciting luxuries and quirks

When you think of Mark Zuckerberg (and his wealth and global status), how do you imagine his home to be? An OTT space, robots for house help, possibly a helipad at home? Well...that visual isn't entirely true. While his house is quite the tech haven, the design of spaces and the interior aesthetic is relaxed, calm and muted. Let's explore his and Priscilla Chan's Palo Alto house, one picture at a time. READ MORE

While the Home is Massive, Its Interiors Aren't Ostentatious

Unlike the homes of most billionaires, the Palo Alto-based home of Mark Zuckerberg, is understated. He purchased this 5,617-square-foot home in May 2011, a year before he married Priscilla Chan. The Crescent Park house comes with a saltwater pool, glassed-in sun room, five bedrooms, and five bathrooms.

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Mark Zuckerberg's home is worth 7 million dollars

It's Close to Work

The home is situated near Facebook's offices in Menlo Park—just a 10-minute drive. Built in 1903, the Silicon Valley home is a ‘no frills' abode. Mark Zuckerberg's home has a large outdoor space—great for parties. There is an entertainment pavilion, fireplace, barbeque area and a spa. The bathroom comes with heated floors and a deep soaking tub made out of marble. The interiors comprise wood flooring and traditional furniture.

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This home is only among one of the many homes owned by Zuckerberg

The Exteriors Are Barbecue and Picnic-Ready Spots

The outdoor spaces are marvels in themselves, uplifting the widely known sunny Californian lifestyle of the west coast. Equipped with a soothing garden saltwater pool, the backyard also projects a tasteful, natural rusticity with its waterfall crested pond. This home is the perfect spot for hosting mega Silicon Valley parties and its outdoor pavilion has been privy to some of California's coolest barbecue socials. Both the front and back porches of the house showcase comfortable wicker patio furniture sets, further highlighting the inherently homely feel of the house.

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Photo caption: The Facebook CEO's home is the perfect spot for hosting mega Silicon Valley parties

Amenities Like No Other

One of the most luxurious spots in the house is the master bathroom that comes equipped with heated floors and an opulent marble, deep soaking tub. Rendered with a subtle palette of beige and cream, the mellow lighting together with the glossy materials of the bathroom set the scene for an indulgent spa day.

The house consists of also a world-class feature: The Facebook Canon. Located right next to the master bedroom closet, this machine-of-sorts deploys Zuckerberg's uniform grey, office t-shirt upon his command. This fascinating and playful feature render's the mansion with a spectacular individualism.

And Yes, the Home Does Have a Friendly Bot

Being a tech and software genius, the Zuckerberg mansion is inevitably equipped with a personal AI assistant called ‘Jarvis.' Set up with the voice of Morgan Freeman, Jarvis recognises guests at the front door with its powerful imaging and voice sensing abilities. Extremely tactile and responsive, this digital spectacle also wakes up the CEO's daughter Maxima every morning, with a Mandarin lesson.

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Zuckerberg's home has its own home assistant Jarvis who's voice is given by Morgan Freeman

Topics  bathroom Bedroom design Facebook home Lighting Mark Zuckerberg Outdoor Pool SPACES Tech

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More on  mark zuckerberg

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Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook

Followed by Milos Zorica and Emanuel Laforté

Can India produce a Mark Zuckerberg?

Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here onYEET?  Anonymous  

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Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of FacebookFollowed by Milos Zorica and Emanuel Laforté

Can India produce a Mark Zuckerberg?

Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

Anonymous

Originally Answered: Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

OK I got this.
WHy do you think that mark zuckerberg is on Quora? Do you think is he here because he has no other work to do,or just for passing time or for increasing his credits? No,my dear friend,Mark is not in the need of any credits,he alerady has a multi-billlion dollar company. I'll tell you why he is here:
Just take a view at the questions asked by him.
He is here to know about how people are responding to facebook,which he can never,ever know on facebook. He can get free,cheap feedback here on quora which would be impossible and much expensive to implement on facebook. So why not use quora,where anxious people are dying to answer for free?
Plus he is here to know about his rival companies, microsoft,foursquare etc. In short,he is here just for a free for all survey for which there does not exist a better platform than this. Please have a look at the link i provided to the questions asked by him.2.9K viewsView 9 upvotesView shares91

Is Keiana Cavé the next Elon Musk/Mark Zuckerberg?

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Brian Farley  Molecular biologist turned biotech data scientist

This is what we’ve come to, friends. Because I’m not terribly interested in being sued for libel, I declare that everything contained in this answer expresses my personal opinion.

I mean no disrespect to Keiana, but the feel-good story of the young, brilliant, entrepreneurial “scientist” is a perennial, egregious failure of science “journalism”. Every year, it seems as though there’s yet another plucky high school senior who has invented and intends to sell a product that will change the world. The cesspool of reportage surrounding the budding scientist breathlessly lionizes their youth and ambition while granting only a passing mention — a sentence or two at best — to what they actually did.

This is an incredible disservice to both the scientific community and the public at large. First, it commits (in my opinion) the cardinal sin of science reporting: focusing on the scientist at the expense of the science. I understand that the ultimate goal of most reporting these days is to attract eyeballs and clicks to drive the rate at which the attention of readers can be sold to the highest bidder, and that narratives like these are easy viral feel-good stories. Who isn’t moved by the potential of extremely gifted students? However, because these stories represent such cherished narratives, scientific due diligence doesn’t happen.

It is precisely when we have a vested interest in something being true that we are compelled to be as skeptical about it as possible. However, the needs and wants of mass media and the general public are at cross purposes to scientific skepticism, so it doesn’t happen.

Perhaps the most egregious example of the media failing to do their homework and valuing personal narratives over scientific soundness is Jack Andraka, the Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer. Essentially, at the age of 15, Jack Andraka claimed to have invented a cheap, reliable test for pancreatic cancer and was celebrated by a wide variety of outlets. However, the test was founded on flawed science, didn’t work as promised, and was never fully described in a way that allowed for expert vetting. However, by investing so much effort and praise in Jack Andraka the scientist instead of Jack Andraka’s flawed science, the media put itself in an untenable position that was difficult to back out of.

I don’t believe that this is happening in this specific case, but this is one of the major pitfalls associated with this style of reporting. Celebrating the scientist before the science itself is vetted is irresponsible at best, and disgusting free advertising for a product at worst.

Secondly, any celebratory narrative about individual scientists (regardless of their age) is wrong. Contemporary science is not performed by individuals in isolation, but instead by large collaborative teams. Singling out one or even a few individuals for recognition is not only unfair to other members of the team, but is also a misrepresentation of how science is performed (but, hey, a charismatic representative helps sell product, so I understand why it happens).

Third, and perhaps worst, is that stories like these completely and totally undercut the reality that scientific research is HARD. Meaningful contributions to science are not and can not be made by solo actors over a six month span. This isn’t because insights are particularly difficult to come by, but instead, because the grinding path to making sure that your favorite ideas and hypotheses are correct requires meticulous experimentation to rule out as many reasonable competing hypotheses as you can think of. Being brilliant isn’t enough; you also have to be hard-working, dedicated, and meticulous. Science is and should be slow, because there’s too much at stake to rush and be wrong — but the science “journalism” that describes these discoverers is a significant threat to that.

Whenever you see a story like this reported by the mainstream media, you shouldn’t feel good — you should be angry.

How can I send Mark Zuckerberg a message he will read?

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Alon Amit

Former Product Manager (Ads) at Facebook (company)The short but honest answer is that you can't. There isn't any scalable way Zuck could let anyone in the world message him privately and read all those messages. Even if you happen to guess his personal e-mail address or work e-mail address, the chances that he'll read a message from someone he doesn't know and is not referred by anyone he does know are very, very small. This isn't because he's mean or indifferent - it's just because he's a highly visible individual with a particularly large number of people who wish to communicate with him, for a wide variety of reasons. Whatever it is you wish to achieve by sending Mark Zuckerberg a private message, there are possibly other approaches which are a lot more likely to be successful. Not knowing anything about your goal, it's hard to sugges(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in "The Social Network"?

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Jimmy Wales·

Wikipedia, Wikia, WikiTribuneOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in the movie "The Social Network"?

I know a few of the people who are depicted in the movie including Mark Zuckerberg and Sean Parker. I have heard some people comment on the movie in a way that I think is accurate: the worst thing about the movie is that as a movie it is actually pretty good, which means that it tells a compelling story.

Unfortunately, not much of that story is actually true.

Let's take one of the key elements of the movie - the suggestion that Mark created Facebook because a girl dumped him. There's that silly "Rosebud" (reference to Citizen Kane) moment at the end when he's shown sadly reloading her profile page. It's a great story, could come straight out of a dramatic Bollywood movie, but it actually has no resemblance to reality. Mark is still married to the woman he was dating when he started Facebook.

If you think Mark is obsessed with money, for example, you're missing the point there as well. I remember once sitting at a table with him, the Google guys, etc., and they were all talking about their jets. As one does, haha. I turned to Mark and said "Do you have a jet?" And he responded with genuine bewilderment: "How would I ever have a jet?" Facebook was already huge and valued in the billions. For all I know, he may have one by now (and why not?), but it wasn't of any interest to him and not a goal that he held.

Similarly, Sean Parker's character in the movie is not really accurate. It has some semblance of accuracy in a way. Sean does like to throw extravagant parties. But what is missing is his cleverness and basic sense of humanity. Do you know what he likes to talk about privately? Money, babes, power? No, actually, he's really got strong academic interests in medical research. He's a geek, and I mean that in the good way.

So, I would approach the movie as fiction - entertaining fiction - but try not to let it color your understanding of the people involved.1.6M viewsView 40,307 upvotesView shares · Answer requested by Midhun Darvin40.3K21191

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What is it like to be interviewed by Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ashwin AJ

Being Engineer I only have experience of giving interview...Originally written by: Charlie Cheever At a birthday party in Belltown (a neighborhood of Seattle,) I ran into Dave Fetterman and Andrew 'Boz' Bosworth who I knew from school, and they had some news: "Guess what? We're quitting our jobs at Microsoft and going down to Silicon Valley to work at Facebook!" I liked Fetterman and Boz and thought they were smart and hearing this made me think that Facebook might actually be a legitimate company where I might find good people to work with. I ended up searching through my Blackberry for the e-mail Facebook had sent me and replying to it from the party. When I interviewed at Facebook, I remember being especially impressed by Dustin and Adam and the plans they outlined for what could be done next with Facebook, in particular news feed. Also, James(more)

Why does Mark Zuckerberg cover his headphone jack with tape?

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Hafiz Rahman

Worked at EntrepreneurshipI covered my laptop's cam for years since I first found out how easy it was to plant a malware on someone's computer. In my case, I planted one on my friend's PC from a video attachment she requested through YM back in my college days. It was just a joke but then I realized that I could turn on her webcam without her knowing (she had a webcam with no lights on it). I could browse her PC, listen to her while she types, copy some files and even make the system crash. I removed the malware straightaway before I think of anything worse. At that time, I thought "if I can do it with little effort, why couldn't those with better hacking skills do a lot worse?" But success at first try didn't stop me just yet. I tried several more times to different people I know, and succeed in some but failed t(more)

What kind of cellphone does Mark Zuckerberg use?

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BIll Wanfeng

Lived in ChinaOriginally Answered: Which phone does Mark Zuckerberg use the most?

must be iphone10K viewsView 13 upvotes132

Has money and power corrupted Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ron Maimon

Lives in New York CityPeople are not corrupted by money and power, at least not in the naive way it is imagined. They are always just doing what they think is best, but when their company becomes enormous, their power becomes enormous, so they tend to engage in terribly desctructive behavior, but this is behavior that would not be predatory and harmful if their business were small, under those circumstances it would be beneficial. Acquiring a competitor and merging is not a problem for two small businesses. It sometimes makes sense. But gobbling up a small competitor when you are a giant means subjecting the management of the company to the dominance of an external bureaucracy which no one person is fully in control of. This squelches the creativity of the small company, in no small part because you have made a(more)

Does Mark Zuckerberg believe in privacy?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

Do not take this as an official statement from or about Facebook's stance towards privacy. It is also written in the form of an answer towards Anon User's comment in Blake Ross's answer below.

I don't really know what Zuck's approach to privacy is, but I do think he has a more nuanced and insightful view of it than most people do.

I do think that his product policies around privacy do more to reflect what he is reading from user desires (not advertisers and certainly not profit-seeking - the most naive interpretation of Facebook's privacy policies is that they are somehow driven by a desire for profit [1]) than anything else. Users ("average people") don't really think about privacy very deeply, and don't understand what it is or its interplay between their other values, and often make choices where they deprioritize privacy against other values, and this is reflected in their behavior and usage of the site, which Zuck is keenly aware of as a product and user-oriented CEO.

My observation of Facebook as a company (its people, including its executives) is that it cares a lot about privacy. It spends a lot of time thinking about it, it spends a lot of time thinking about how to protect its users' privacy, and then (ironically) it is continually surprised at how the vast majority of its users don't end up really caring at all to make use of various privacy-protection mechanisms built into the products. There are public flare-ups, but these are subject to a selection bias, in that there aren't flare-ups when people don't have a privacy issue (i.e. it is more a symptom of how often Facebook deals with privacy issues rather than how well/poorly it does). Instead, the company is often in a position of balancing user desires for a less-private product with its own feelings that user privacy needs to be protected more.

Consider: a product exists which can allow you, a user, to invade the privacy [to some degree, along a fairly muddy continuum] of other users. These users include your friends, family, and certain strangers. In return, it allows other people to invade your privacy in the same way, but you often don't know when they are doing it. I use the word "invade" here not to mean "cross some system-designed boundary," but in the muddier sense of "seeing some information I've technically made accessible but didn't think too much about and therefore would feel a little uncomfortable if certain people saw it." This is the root of most privacy "issues."

The problem is that the vast majority of users spend their time using Facebook to, essentially, invade the privacy of those around them (and of strangers they find interesting), and generally request feature modifications to enhance their ability to do so. They want profiles of strangers to be more public (so they can e.g. tell if someone is a former classmate), they want apps to be able to pull information about their friends (because the app is supposedly part of Facebook, so why can't it do so?), they want to see this and that which their friends want to hide from them. Almost no one says "I want my information to be more hidden by default and I would find the product more useful to me if it was so for everyone else."

The essential problem with privacy as a right is that it is not understood by most people in the way that other rights are. Most people understand that, e.g. the right to property is a reciprocal right: you want your property rights respected, and in turn you are willing to not steal things from others. This is not so with privacy. Plenty of people read with gushing delight the lurid details and gossip of celebrities or other semi-private individuals (like high-profile crime cases) - and demand a "right" to do so - when they would not be comfortable exposing such details about their own lives. How many of you, despite Tiger Woods specifically stating the the details of his affairs should be a private matter, nevertheless read the news reports about him and, in some cases, even looked up more information? Did you realize you were callously violating his privacy, providing the demand for tabloid articles? That's exactly the demand that users place on Facebook every day, wanting to invade the privacy of their friends, family, and acquaintance-strangers.

Mark Zuckerberg, having helmed the company from its earliest days, is pretty familiar and realistic about this being the zeitgeist of the userbase, as are many long-time employees, and he and many long-time employees are able to think about privacy in this way - i.e. both about privacy and about how people really think and act about privacy. Most of the company (owing to fast growth, the majority of the employee base at any one time has been there for less than 2 years) holds the realization of these user desires in a sort of mild horror and reluctance.

Therefore, my interpretation of the reality behind that quote (unsourced) is that Mark Zuckerberg probably cares about privacy, but he probably also understands it in a far deeper way than most people do, because he has to work with it in a real and practical sense, and so if he "doesn't believe in it," it's in the way that someone doesn't "believe in" a primitive and unexamined view of something when he has had to personally develop a fuller and deeper understanding of it.


Again:

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

----

[1] One of the most naive and oft-repeated interpretations of every action Facebook takes is that it is being done out of an desire to maximize profits. These are often incorrect. A close study of Facebook's actions over its history will indicate that the company - and in particular Mark Zuckerberg - have deliberately and repeatedly made decisions that defer or even reduce revenue potential in pursuit of other goals.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg always wear the same shirt?

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Sai

IT Analyst at Dell International (2016–present)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had his first-ever public Q&A session on Thursday.

He answered a lot of questions, but the one that got a lot of interest was, “Why do you wear the same T-shirt every day?”

For those who haven’t noticed, Zuckerberg wears the same gray T-shirt at most public events. While many expected a playful response, Zuckerberg gave a pretty serious answer for his penchant to wear the same gray shirt.

"I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community," Zuckerberg said, after clarifying that he had "multiple same shirts."

He said even small decisions like choosing what to wear or what to eat for breakfast could be tiring and consume energy, and he didn't want to waste any time on that.

"I'm in this really lucky position, where I get to wake up every day and help serve more than a billion people. And I feel like I'm not doing my job if I spend any of my energy on things that are silly or frivolous about my life," he said.

Zuckerberg pointed out that numerous other influential people, like Apple founder Steve Jobs or President Barack Obama, have the same theory with regards to choosing their outfits. Jobs, in fact, told biographer Walter Isaacson that he even wanted to have all Apple employees wear the same vest.

João Paulino·

Lived in Angola (2017–2017)

Hi, Mark Zuckerberg. I am African and I live in Angola. I am experiencing great economic difficulties in relation to the financing of my studies (higher education) after the death of my brother I no longer have where to turn. I ask the world that I have the opportunity to study, but it is difficult to find someone so charitable about it. Please help me

My email: joaopaulino07@hotmail.com1.

What are the things Adam D'Angelo taught Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ravi Mishra

Just another engineerMark Zuckerberg said that he learned a lot from Adam D'Angelo. This is the original blog post by Aaron Greenspan. Writing :: The Lost Chapter and this is the article on business insider. In Alleged New IMs, Mark Zuckerberg Says There Are Only '6 People In The World With Good Ideas'(more)

Why doesn't Mark Zuckerberg date supermodels?

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Will Chou

Lived in Washington, DC

Mark is a nerd. And people have different interests and tastes.

He gets more enjoyment from programming and building a business than he does from traveling the world, living on yachts, playing with dolls, creating music, or dating models.

It’s shocking to believe and I get you because I used to find it hard that other people didn’t share my interests and passions too. How come someone not see the beauty in star wars or how awesome a girl’s butt is?

But the truth is that people can have widely different views and values, though most people share similarities (think the standard bell curve).

Mark was obsessed with building and growing Facebook and that’s what he did.

He had a girl that was smart, going to be a doctor, loyal, honest, and hard working. Likely, he valued these traits, as you should, because they indicate a strong partner and (also coincidentally a strong employee to hire).

There are more and different things to value than just the superficial. Believe me, it’s hard for me to fathom too even though I understand it on a logical level because my genetics spur me to dramatically overemphasize the physical.

A lot of people imagine the supermodel to have a glamorous life and nothing but fantastic qualities: jet-setting around the world, rich, famous, beautiful, successful, ambitious, hard working … right?

But I’ve followed some of these girls on youtube via their vlogs and other social media and there lives aren’t ideal for a relationship. Because of work, they’re always traveling and never in the same city for long, which makes maintaining a relationship hard because it’s long distance.

Also, they’re constantly bombarded with different people they’re meeting, photoshoots, tempations, and parties.

While there is definitely hard work involved, luck plays more of a role in this field. The industry is built on reaching your peak earning potential while still very young (20 when most people live until their 80’s) so it is a breeding ground for people to get arrogant and large egos about their ability when a lot of it was due to their genetic luck around their beauty and dimensions.

It’s super easy and tempting to overemphasize the beauty of a woman over everything else, I fall for it too and it’s the natural thing for most men to do. Other CEO’s, like the CEO of Snapchat and Elon Musk, and band leaders, like Adam Levine, are dating or married to Victoria’s Secret models likely for this reason.

These models are typically seen by society as what society chooses as the “most beautiful women on earth” (whether or not that is true is debatable but you get the point). And many men fall for this as a measuring stick for their ego by showing off that they can get these highly desirable women at the top of the ego, often forsaking other qualities or overlooking other traits (empathy, emotional intelligence, hustle, ambition, caring, etc.) for this title.

And maybe that’s why Elon’s two times divorced. But maybe not.

How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg?

Anonymous

Originally Answered: How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg? Its an emergency situation

Oh my goodness, that is so cute on multiple levels.

  1. You think 'inspiring' a group of college students is an emergency
  2. You think it is such an emergency that you could compel a billionaire to fly to New York or otherwise participate in some fashion

I'm shocked. Are people in this world really so naive? What could possibly make you think you could get any help to inspire a group of apathetic millennials?4.2K viewsView 15 upvotes15

How good of a programmer is Mark Zuckerberg and does he still sometimes code for Facebook?

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Dakini Alexandra Isenegger·

CEO @Linkilaw | Forbes 30 Under 30 | Top Writer 2017 & 2018In 2006, Zuckerberg gave up coding to focus on running the business of Facebook. When visiting Nigeria in August 2016, he admitted publicly that giving up coding to manage his company was "a little sad"."There is an elegance to writing code that I miss," Zuckerberg said during a Q&A session with tech entrepreneurs and developers in Lagos, Nigeria. "The code always does what you want - and people don't." Even though he has expressed love for programming, Zuckerberg majored in psychology, not computer science. His peers don’t place him in the uppermost tier of skilled coders. On TopCoder, a site where coders improve and rank their skills, he's only in the third level. Adam D'Angelo — the former CTO of Facebook and founder of Quora — is in the top level, "red." (The ranking goes grey, green, b(more)

What was it like to go to Harvard with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Aamer Tahseen

Back on this site...for nowMy dad used to go with him for a temporary study computer science so he told me the story of the Facebook experience from his point of view. At the time Zuckerberg was a prodigy, and he always won the attention of the teachers, every time my dad used to raise his hand during lectures, the professor would still ignore him, even though Zuckerberg wasn't even listening in class he would be picked. As the year passed by, and Zuckerberg was slowly coming into the development of "Facebook", my father always noticed his wide interests in social communications, at the time, for undergraduates there would be something called a "face book", a collage for names and pictures of students, my dad didn't even care because, but he did notice that Zuckerberg was always fascinated by that and he always sp(more)

Why is Mark Zuckerberg's Twitter user name finkd?

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Samuel E. Koranteng

There's a silver lining to all this global chaos, and Mark believes that. After Mark stopped visiting New York when his cousin was robbed by amateur droids, he ventured down a new path of telekinetic travel. It was on one of these trips that he met Finkelton! -an unusually tiny species of alien who advised him to acquire a billion dollars in 3 month. Thus Facebook was born. That Twitter name is a memorial to one of Mark's best advisers from outer space, who was incinerated three months ago. Disclaimer: Mark mentioned here is Mark Jupalopa of Senegal, and the writer reserves the right to humorous answers.

How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

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Adam Rifkin

Better to be a Founder than a Loser.Originally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing?

The valuation jumps from round to round were orders of magnitude until Facebook hit a $15 billion valuation, resulting in tiny dilutions accompanying each financing.

Note also that with every financing, the Silicon Valley echo chamber thought the investors were nuts to offer such rich valuations. It's now clear the echo chamber was wrong every time; the investors were quite savvy, as a matter of fact.

I don't know exact numbers, but I believe Facebook's equity sales to investors were roughly:

Sep 04 -- 10% sold for $500k. ($5mm valuation -- Peter Thiel, Angels)

May 05 -- 12.7% sold for $12.7mm. ($100mm valuation -- Accel)

Apr 06 -- 5% sold for $27.5mm. ($550mm valuation -- Greylock, Meritech, Founders Fund)

Oct 07 -- 1.6% sold for $240mm. ($15b valuation -- Microsoft)

Nov 07 thru Apr 08 -- 0.9% sold for $135mm ($15b valuation -- Li Ka-shing and European Founders Fund)

May 08 -- no dilution; took $100mm in venture debt from Triple Point Capital

May 09 -- 1.3% sold for $200mm. ($15b valuation -- Digital Sky Technologies)

Jun 10 -- 0.8% sold for $120mm (a blended $14b valuation -- Elevation)

Jan 11 -- 3% sold for $1.5b ($50b valuation -- thank you Goldman Sachs!)

Feb 11 -- 0.1% sold for $38mm ($52b valuation -- really, KPCB?!)


Alexia Tsotsis did an incredible job representing these financing rounds as a fantastic infographic: TechCrunch.com/2011/01/10/facebook-5/

The Next Web and Scobleizer have an excellent graphic of who owns Facebook as of 1/11/11, accounting for dilutions: TheNextWeb.com/facebook/2011/01/12/so-who-really-owns-facebook-chart/

The reasons for drastic up rounds of valuation each time were:

1) The unprecedented momentum of product's core metrics (users and usage).

2) The excellent advice and guidance from the beginning, first from Stephen Venuto and Sean Parker, then Peter Thiel and Reid Garrett Hoffman, then Matt Cohler and Jim Breyer, and at some point Marc Andreessen.

3) Enough revenues (mostly ads) to never have to raise a round with unfriendly terms. See Carlos Tobin's answer to How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

The unusual combination of tremendous product momentum and the right people involved created the ideal conditions for such tiny dilution.


One other factor: Zuck never had an equal co-founder like Larry and Sergey. Were that the case, both Zuck and co-Zuck would each own 13%, rendering them roughly the same as pre-IPO Google.

See also: What were the 4 or 5 key decisions that Mark Zuckerberg made in the early days of Facebook?

Is Mark Zuckerberg difficult to work with?

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Yishan Wong·

Worked at Facebook (company)No. There are plenty of people who are happy to work with him, though there are also plenty who find it difficult. He is not some sort of ideally charismatic person whose primary quality is that he's easy to get along with. Rather, he's a demanding CEO with a monomaniacal focus on making Facebook succeed in its mission. This is not to say that he's mean - he's a perfectly nice guy on a personal level; it's just that professionally, he is focused on getting it done, and has a limited tolerance for emotional fragility in the people he needs to help him execute on that mission. In my study of business leaders, I've yet to come across one who was considered "great" who didn't also have a significant body count of ex-employees claiming that they were autocratic and mean. Examples include Jac(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a good human being?

Anonymous

Personally, I don't think he's that great. I always think of random ideas and wonder "hmm should I mock something up and try to implement it?", but I never do cause I'm complacent with my daily routines. Couple years back I got really sick and took a leave from work, which left me with some availability in my day (when not complaining about my aching body). I was trying to complete something on Facebook and was having some difficulties sorting out the privacy permission settings and thought for something that was designed to be user friendly, it really isn't that friendly. Well, I had time to mock something up to potentially make Facebook user friendly. With over 30 hours of brainstorming and trying to convince my dog that his walk would be in 10 minutes, I had a eureka moment. I drafted.

Does Mark Zuckerberg have mild Asperger's?

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Blandine Mifsud·

17 years in a relationship with a self-harming partner

Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic?

NOTE: The original question was:”Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic” My answer was to that exact question and not to the merge and different: Is Mark Zuckerberg psychopathic”

Kahn compares psychopathy to autism, not because the two disorders are similar in their manifestation, but because they're both neurological disorders. There is an overlap between the symptoms of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders. Those two disorders require differential diagnosis:

[Differential diagnosis of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders in adults. Empathic deficit as a core symptom].


Hi Gabriela, I do not know for sure as I have not investigated him.

NOTE: It would take me more than one week to asses him (or anyone). I don’t even do proper assessment. I simply investigate genetics with dysmorphology. Focusing only on some specific personalities: the ones that I consider to be of specific interest regarding my current investigation. At the present time, Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t fit my criteria / doesn’t interest me. I‘ll certainly not investigate him unless Mark himself will contact me for that purpose. Secondly, considering that I’m an amateur detective and not a professional geneticist, obviously he will never made such request.

What I can say from few seconds checking pictures from Google is that Mark Zuckerberg seems to have few dysmorphic facial features.

He seems to have an asymmetric face. Asymmetric face indicates a problem on the midline, a rather symptomatic occurrence in male autistic patients. Patient with this cranial anomaly tend to have some others anomalies. Mark has an extremely mild orbital hypotelorism (an abnormally decreased distance between the eyes).

Autistic people have more anomalies related to their ears : Size, rotation, location….

Mark’s ears doesn’t seem to be on the same level: it could be a sign of sensory disorder, a condition comorbid in autism. Sensory disorder exists without autism.

Clinical research: Facial features can help diagnose autism | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Autistic people collect routines: routines in speech, routine in behaviors, routine in postures… Mark Z have limited facial expression, limited postures. I could not help to notice the way he holds his hands seems very repetitive. It’s difficult not to notice that he is not a fashion addict neither: his wardrobe is basically a grey tee shirt + jean or a dark costume with a white shirt..and a tie (of changing colors in hue ranging from grey to blue).

Autism is a spectrum. A wide spectrum. Most of those on the spectrum have special interest in which they will become real experts. It’s hard to deny Mark Zuckerberg is above fluent in computer. You need a special brain to master that technologie the way he masters it…

At the present time dysmorphology is not used as a diagnostic tool for autism. Before Mark could qualify as autistic he will have to fill each an every of the six Gillberg’s criteria for confirmation of diagnosis.

GILLBERG'S CRITERIA FOR ASPERGER'S DISORDER (SYNDROME)

  1. Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction
    (at least two of the following)
    (a) inability to interact with peers
    (b) lack of desire to interact with peers
    (c) lack of appreciation of social cues
    (d) socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior

2. All-absorbing narrow interest
(at least one of the following)
(a) exclusion of other activities
(b) repetitive adherence
(c) more rote than meaning

3. Imposition of routines and interests
(at least one of the following)
(a) on self, in aspects of life
(b) on others

4. Speech and language problems
(at least three of the following)
(a) delayed development
(b) superficially perfect expressive language
(c) formal, pedantic language
(d) odd prosody, peculiar voice characteristics
(e) impairment of comprehension including misinterpretations of literal/implied meanings

5. Non-verbal communication problems
(at least one of the following)
(a) limited use of gestures
(b) clumsy/gauche body language
(c) limited facial expression
(d) inappropriate expression
(e) peculiar, stiff gaze

6.Motor clumsiness: poor performance on neurodevelopmental examination

Considering that Mark did take a parternity leave following the birth of his daughter, he doesn’t seems to have inability to interact with peers or lack of desire to interact with peers. In order to qualify as autistic Marck will have to fill the criteria of Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction with either the lack of appreciation of social cues and to behave socially and emotionally inappropriate.By Gabriela Ela ela.

How good is Mark Zuckerberg's Chinese?

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Glenn Luk·

Expert in the ABC dialectOn a scale from Chris Tucker to Dashan, his accent is somewhere between John Cena and Jon Huntsman. Here is Mark speaking at Tsinghua University in October 2014: A year later, he gave another speech in Mandarin (Facebook Video) and he had clearly improved. And then for Chinese New Year 2016, he and his wife Priscilla uploaded a video: You can tell that his Chinese is getting better over time.

Honestly, in the New Year’s video it’s probably on the same level as his (Chinese-American) wife. If he has been keeping it up, it should be even better by now! P.S. I really have a lot of respect for Mark for putting himself out there and speaking Chinese in public even though it is not his native language. 加油 Mark! P.P.S. Accent can be(more)

How academically smart is Mark Zuckerberg? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

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Robert Scoble

Former Chief Strategy Officer at Infinite Retina (2019–2020)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg, academic-wise? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

I've spent time with both several times. I find Bill Gates is just an amazing intellect, and I don't think it's fair to compare ANYONE to him. Zuckerberg is also an amazing intellect, but it's different and we haven't had as many opportunities to study him the way we have had with Gates.

Bill Gates has a photographic memory. One time he said something on stage word-for-word that I had told him six months prior. Many people I know have these experiences with Bill. Every time I meet him I mostly listen. My intellect isn't even close to his. Zuckerberg, though, for some reason, feels a bit more approachable, but I attribute that to his age and the fact that he's building something I understand a bit more than I understood the internals of Windows.

Zuckerberg, too, is damn smart and in recent conversations with him I've come away thinking "he just is doing better thinking on social software than anyone else." Plus, in addition to his other academic qualifications, he studied Chinese for his recent trip. I was only able to learn a few words. I'm sure he did a lot better! :-) I don't remember Gates learning other languages (update: Gary Stein says that he and his wife are learning Chinese), although I'm sure he'd count basic and C++ as other languages.

On the other hand, Zuckerberg seems more comfortable in social settings, walking me right up to Jet Li and introducing us at a Time party. I met Gates at one party in the mid-90s and just had a tough time getting him to talk until we started talking about just-in-time compilers and then he went on for half an hour. At last year's TED in the hallways Bill did the same thing, but instead of talking compilers was talking about nuclear power.

Zuckerberg has impressed me similarly, but is still focused on building Facebook so isn't spending much time thinking about other things. Clearly, as the questioner showed, Zuckerberg is a smart dude too and picks things up VERY fast. I witnessed this when Zuckerberg met other CEOs and discussed the technologies they were using to build their companies.

So, to answer the question: Gates wins, but mostly because we've seen how he learns new topics for a longer time.

What would be interesting is to put the 26-year-old Gates next to the 26-year-old Zuckerberg and compare them. If we did that then Zuckerberg probably would win.

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What has Adam D'Angelo learned from Mark Zuckerberg?

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Chirag Shah

Former Software Developer at Barclays Investment Bank (company) (2018–2019)

I am not the right person to answer this, but I would like to have my say.

Adam D'Angelo - the former CTO of Facebook was a pure geek guy with amazing coding abilities in his early days, we can see this from his topcoder profile. dangelo Profile | TopCoder He was at top level, “red”.

On the other hand Zuckerberg's profile on the site is at the "green" level which isn’t as good as the one Angelo has. mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder

Having said that, Zuckerberg knew how to build projects, he knew how systems were built, how to bring the ideas into reality and how to indulge people by using the notion of ‘connectivity’.

This can be concluded from that fact that he developed a ‘course selection program’ and ‘facemash’ in his sophomore year at Harvard.

During a CS50 course, Mark had delivered a guest lecture regarding how he expanded and scaled facebook to a global level.

Here is his talk:

Mark was very confident in whatever he did, he had a sense of control in what he built. He had a clear vision and he always wanted to build his product for the people, he wanted people to be connected to each other.

These were the qualities which could have been observed by Adam.

Apart from his coding prowess, Adam could have learned how to build a company, how to scale the products and monetize them.

Also given the fact that whole idea of Mark was to connect people, Adam could have been inspired by this very whole idea of ‘how to connect people’ and hence he built this amazing ‘Quora’ where people were more connected by their questions and ideas, where they could share their views and opinions.

This is just my take on this subject. What Adam has learned can be answered by no one other than him.

Thanks.

Why is Mark Zuckerberg so hated?

Quy Tan

Knows VietnameseI think because of the following reasons: 1. He is a Jew. If you visit White Supremacist forums (I visit these harmful websites sometimes, just because of curiosity), they hate Jew and Israel deeply, and especially they hate the most famous, richest, most successful and most powerful Jew like Mark Zuckerberg. Oh don't worry, they hate everything. They hate Black, Chinese, and White Liberal as well. 2. He is accused of anti-conservative bias. He also got hated by Trump supporters. For example, he often fact-checks or even delete wrong claim or disinformation regarding Coronavirus by Trump or some Trump supporters. 3. Rumors and fake news: It is so ridiculous that New Tang Dynasty Vietnam claim that Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg are a “slave” of China, and work for China favor.

What are some interesting facts about Mark Zuckerberg?

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Bhanu Prasad

UI Developer at Virtusa (company)Here are a few facts about the facebook legend... 1) All Blue Facebook CEO is red-green colour blind, which means that the best colour he can see is blue. Zuckerberg reportedly once said, "Blue is the richest colour for me. I can see all of blue." No prizes for guessing why blue is the most dominant colour on the world's top social networking site. 2) Declined job offers from Microsoft, AOL While in high school, Zuckerberg co-developed a music app called Synapse Media Player. Tech giants Microsoft and AOL reportedly offered Zuckerberg a million dollars to further develop the app as well as wanted to hire him. Zuckerberg instead chose to join Harvard University. 3) Doesn't own a TV, calls himself atheist Born to Jewish parents, Zuckerberg considers himself an atheist.

How did Mark Zuckerberg become a programming prodigy?

David Roth

Former Digital SE at Amazon (company) (2011–2013)

how did Mark Zuckerberg train himself to be a programming prodigy?

This is a very interesting question to me because, as several responders have pointed out already, it's based on a flawed premise. Mark Zuckerberg is not the person that most coders would think of when they hear the term "programming prodigy".

I think the questioner equates fame, wealth, or success with being a prodigy. This is almost never the case in coding. Coders who are good will generally make a good living but they do not, as a rule, become CEOs.

When I think of a programming prodigy, the first person who comes to mind is Paul Allen, because of the anecdote about writing the loader for Microsoft Basic for the Altair computer while flying to Albuquerque. Note that this was in 1975; there weren't laptops that you could take on a plane then. Allen was writing machine code on a piece of paper with a pencil, and he created a loader program that worked. That's pretty amazing. Altair BASIC

Another prodigy would be Margaret Hamilton. She wrote the code for the Apollo space program. The sheer scope of that project and the hardware limitations she was dealing with are staggering. She had finished this code by the time she was 31. Margaret Hamilton (scientist)

As for the "how did x train themselves to become a prodigy" part of the question, you don't really train to become a prodigy. A prodigy is someone who is exceptionally good at what they do; there is an implication in term that the person is naturally gifted. A prodigy has a natural interest in their chosen art and they're good at it, so they enjoy practicing it and studying it. "Training to become a prodigy" is kind of like "training to become lucky"; it's a nonsensical proposition.

How self-disciplined is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Arjun Singh

Content Creator at BackNo (2018–present)Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg is very sensitive Entrepreneur in the world. I have noticed many things when I read the blog, books and watched videos. so all I want to share on Quora platform. * Only Only Eats What I Kills: * * Zuckerberg's view on nutrition ethics is similar to some types of Buddhist vegetarianism and Locavorism. And as he himself admitted, it's "basically" a vegetarian diet. However, the fact that Zuckerberg did kill some animals himself — according to Fortune, this includes a lobster, chicken, pig and a goat — to eat them will surely stir some controversy. Zuckerberg even posted a message on his private Facebook page on May 4 saying, "I just killed a pig and a goat." * Set annual goals: * * Despite his claim of laser-focus, Zuckerberg has always had interests beyond social media.

How does Mark Zuckerberg manage his time?

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Pascal Lorig

Lives in GermanyThe key is outsourcing. No matter if Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, all of them have personal assistants and a crew around them. Their business basically is running itself. Their job is showing the course. That is why they do meetings all the time. Private time does not require much management, because there is very little. Steve Jobs for instance took his spare time for having dinner with the whole family. Once a year he made time for holidays. Mark Zuckerberg himself said that you get what you spend the most time on. So he eliminates all distractions. For instance his clothing is always the same. He is also known for sleeping less than usual people. So that gives him extra time. People like Mark Zuckerberg also have to prioritise. There are times when they have to choose.

How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email? How many hundreds or thousands of emails do they receive daily, and how do they manage them? Do they have an assistant that filters all the important stuff?

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Tim Williams

Originally Answered: How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email?

It's all about the content of the email that determines how it would be handled.

They are humans, they get notifications of new mail, and assuming they're near their device, they will see it firsthand like the rest of us.

Here are some possibilities for handling:

  • Direct communication with other leaders of the company, employees, relevant partner companies, important service providers, and of course financial/banking matters. I'd also assume even government and other national and international matters.
  • Basic filters for newsletters, list emails from companies/competitors they're interested in, and other subject matters they follow.
  • Pre-written personal responses for some frequent inquiries: Can you attend my conference, talk to me on the phone about my project, mentor me, or some other general ask that... if they weren't so highly desired, they would be likely to want to listen to you. These are replies they can copy/paste from drafts, Evernote, or whatever tool of choice.
  • Forward to the appropriate person. Often times, emails are sent to these figures misguidedly. There are plenty of people who work for them who are far more suited to reply, so for a basic example, a legitimate email for some real business development opportunity - would be forwarded without a personal response to the appropriate person.
  • Personal Assistant(s). For things like scheduling meetings, phone calls, events, and other things that said recipient wants to actually take part in, they are unlikely to coordinate the logistics personally. This is where they may confirm something by email and then pass off to a PA to handle the details. A PA may also convert verbal responses into email responses for convenience and speed.
  • Multiple email addresses. I am less sure of this one, but I'd guess that they have an email address that's easy enough to guess that they do monitor (first.last@whatever.com) that follows the above protocol that receives a bulk of it. Then, they probably have a secondary company email that is strictly private or even perhaps limited to company and authorized sender list only for what I'll call "daily biz". And of course lastly, one or more personal email addresses to communicate with family and others.

In summary, it's all about what the content of the email is and that will determine any number of filters as to how it's handled.

What are some of Mark Zuckerberg's mistakes at Facebook?

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Eric Benjamin Seufert

Author of Freemium Economics, Owner of Mobile Dev MemoFacebook waited too long to transition to mobile (Facebook only launched its native iOS app in August 2012! Facebook Launches Native App for iPhone and iPad, Rebuilt From Ground Up) and as a result wasn't able to capture the mobile advertising market in near entirety, which it almost certainly would have had it focused on mobile (and, subsequently, mobile advertising) sooner. Had Facebook acted faster, it probably could have preempted the creation of the affiliate / syndication networks that proliferated on mobile beginning in around 2012 and added tens of billions of dollars to its enterprise value at exactly the point when many public investors became skittish about its future prospects (Facebook Stock Sinks Below $30 -- How Much Farther Will it Drop?). That said, Facebook's transition

Should Mark Zuckerberg slowly phase advertising out of Facebook's ecosystem?

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Mark Rogowsky

Forbes technology, raconteur, @maxrogoBy all means. I mean, it's currently only about 90% of Facebook's revenue. And that revenue is only going to be about $5 billion this year. And it was zero just a few years ago. So, I mean clearly this whole advertising thing isn't working out for Facebook. Also, the company only has something like a billion users and only half of them log on daily. And when it rolled out its newest ad product, Sponsored Stories, it only found that was worth about $1 million per day. To make matters worse, only half that revenue was coming from mobile -- and lots of people use Facebook on mobile. Finally, it's crystal clear that for Facebook to exploit new monetization schemes it has to stop making money from advertising because clearly those are mutually exclusive. There is obviously no way to begin chargi(more)

Between Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, who is more selfish? Why?

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Sean Chou·Updated August 28, 2018Business Intelligence Consultant & small business owner;ENTJUndoubtedly Mark Zuckerberg is more selfish. Zuckerberg’s professional motto has always been “connecting the world” through Facebook, which any self-respecting person can see serves his own purposes. Facebook now touts half or nearly half the world's population as users, and it continues to grow. Not so long ago, Zuckerberg wished to be the face of modern colonialism by “gifting” large portions of India with free wifi internet access, albeit tethered permanently to his own Facebook platform. India refused it unsurprisingly, and Zuckerberg jested that India didn't want to “step into the future.” Nevertheless, he did not pursue giving India free internet without also shoving Facebook down their throats. Another case in point: Zuckerberg has pledged with so many other billionaires to give away(more)

How can I get in touch with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Joe Tannorella

Founder at UIDB.io (2016–present)When I wanted to contact an equally famous person - Sir Richard Branson - I made this: Dear Sir Richard Branson It took 2 weeks of pure hustle, including: * Calling all of his company receptions (Virgin Group reception were especially receptive) * Asking everyone in my network * Trying to reach his family members and their respective companies: son, daughter * Messaging all of his company CEOs via email and LinkedIn Premium * Commenting on his social media posts * Facebook advertising. Targeted him, his family, and more * Calling the BBC when I found out that SRB was live on their show that evening * Twitter advertising * …A hell of a lot more… You have to really want it. And you have to give him a reason to want to read what you’re telling him. Good luck!

Who is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Mayank Sharma

HR at Teleperformance Indore (2019–present)

Who is Mark Zukerburg?

Mark Zuckerberg ( Chief Executive Officer of Facebook )

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is an American technology entrepreneur and philanthropist. Zuckerberg is known for co-founding and leading Facebook as its chairman and chief executive officer. He also co-founded and is a board member of the solar sail spacecraft development project Breakthrough Starshot

Who Is Mark Zuckerberg?

Born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, Mark Zuckerberg co-founded the social-networking website Facebook out of his college dorm room.

He left Harvard after his sophomore year to concentrate on the site, the user base of which has grown to more than 2 billion people, making Zuckerberg a billionaire many times over. The birth of Facebook was portrayed in the 2010 film The Social Network.

Early Life

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg was born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, into a comfortable, well-educated family, and raised in the nearby village of Dobbs Ferry.

His father, Edward Zuckerberg, ran a dental practice attached to the family's home. His mother, Karen, worked as a psychiatrist before the birth of the couple's four children—Mark, Randi, Donna and Arielle.

Zuckerberg developed an interest in computers at an early age; when he was about 12, he used Atari BASIC to create a messaging program he named "Zucknet." His father used the program in his dental office, so that the receptionist could inform him of a new patient without yelling across the room. The family also used Zucknet to communicate within the house.

Together with his friends, he also created computer games just for fun. "I had a bunch of friends who were artists," he said. "They'd come over, draw stuff, and I'd build a game out of it."

Education

To keep up with Mark's burgeoning interest in computers, his parents hired private computer tutor David Newman to come to the house once a week and work with Mark. Newman later told reporters that it was hard to stay ahead of the prodigy, who began taking graduate courses at nearby Mercy College around this same time.

Zuckerberg later studied at Phillips Exeter Academy, an exclusive preparatory school in New Hampshire. There he showed talent in fencing, becoming the captain of the school's team. He also excelled in literature, earning a diploma in classics.

Yet Zuckerberg remained fascinated by computers, and continued to work on developing new programs. While still in high school, he created an early version of the music software Pandora, which he called Synapse.

Several companies—including AOL and Microsoft—expressed an interest in buying the software, and hiring the teenager before graduation. He declined the offers.

Zuckerberg at Harvard

After graduating from Exeter in 2002, Zuckerberg enrolled at Harvard University. By his sophomore year at the Ivy League institution, he had developed a reputation as the go-to software developer on campus. It was at that time that he built a program called CourseMatch, which helped students choose their classes based on the course selections of other users.

He also invented Facemash, which compared the pictures of two students on campus and allowed users to vote on which one was more attractive. The program became wildly popular, but was later shut down by the school administration after it was deemed inappropriate.

Based on the buzz of his previous projects, three of his fellow students—Divya Narendra, and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss—sought him out to work on an idea for a social networking site they called Harvard Connection. This site was designed to use information from Harvard's student networks in order to create a dating site for the Harvard elite.

Zuckerberg agreed to help with the project, but soon dropped out to work on his own social networking site with friends Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes and Eduardo Saverin.

Zuckerberg and his friends created a site that allowed users to create their own profiles, upload photos, and communicate with other users. The group ran the site—first called The Facebook—out of a dorm room at Harvard until June 2004.

After his sophomore year, Zuckerberg dropped out of college to devote himself to Facebook full time, moving the company to Palo Alto, California. By the end of 2004, Facebook had 1 million users.

Facebook Rises

In 2005, Zuckerberg's enterprise received a huge boost from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. Accel invested $12.7 million into the network, which at the time was open only to Ivy League students.

Zuckerberg's company then granted access to other colleges, high school and international schools, pushing the site's membership to more than 5.5 million users by December 2005. The site then began attracting the interest of other companies, who wanted to advertise with the popular social hub.

Not wanting to sell out, Zuckerberg turned down offers from companies such as Yahoo! and MTV Networks. Instead, he focused on expanding the site, opening up his project to outside developers and adding more features.

Legal Hurdles

Zuckerberg seemed to be going nowhere but up. However, in 2006, the business mogul faced his first big hurdle: the creators of Harvard Connection claimed that Zuckerberg stole their idea, and insisted the software developer needed to pay for their business losses.

Zuckerberg maintained that the ideas were based on two very different types of social networks but, after lawyers searched Zuckerberg's records, incriminating instant messages revealed that Zuckerberg may have intentionally stolen the intellectual property of Harvard Connection and offered Facebook users' private information to his friends.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the incriminating messages, saying he regretted them. "If you're going to go on to build a service that is influential and that a lot of people rely on, then you need to be mature, right?" he said in an interview with The New Yorker. "I think I've grown and learned a lot."

Although an initial settlement of $65 million was reached between the two parties, the legal dispute over the matter continued well into 2011, after Narendra and the Winklevosses claimed they were misled in regards to the value of their stock.

'The Social Network'

Zuckerberg faced yet another personal challenge when the 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, by writer Ben Mezrich, hit stores. Mezrich was heavily criticized for his re-telling of Zuckerberg's story, which used invented scenes, re-imagined dialogue and fictional characters.

Regardless of how true-to-life the story was, Mezrich managed to sell the rights of the tale to screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the critically acclaimed film The Social Network received eight Academy Award nominations.

Zuckerberg objected strongly to the film's narrative, and later told a reporter at The New Yorker that many of the details in the film were inaccurate. For example, Zuckerberg had been dating longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan, a Chinese-American medical student he met at Harvard, since 2003. He also said he never had interest in joining any of the final clubs.

"It's interesting what stuff they focused on getting right; like, every single shirt and fleece that I had in that movie is actually a shirt or fleece that I own," Zuckerberg told a reporter at a startup conference in 2010. "So there's all this stuff that they got wrong and a bunch of random details that they got right."

Yet Zuckerberg and Facebook continued to succeed, in spite of the criticism. Time magazine named him Person of the Year in 2010, and Vanity Fair placed him at the top of their New Establishment list.

Net Worth

Forbes ranked Zuckerberg at No. 35—beating out Apple CEO Steve Jobs—on its "400" list, estimating his net worth to be $6.9 billion at the time.

Philanthropic Causes

Since amassing his sizeable fortune, Zuckerberg has used his millions to fund a variety of philanthropic causes. The most notable examples came in 2010: In September of that year, he donated $100 million to save the failing Newark Public Schools system in New Jersey.

Then, in December 2010, Zuckerberg signed the "Giving Pledge", promising to donate at least 50 percent of his wealth to charity over the course of his lifetime. Other Giving Pledge members include Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and George Lucas. After his donation, Zuckerberg called on other young, wealthy entrepreneurs to follow suit.

"With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts," he said.

Facebook IPO

Zuckerberg made two major life changes in May 2012: Facebook had its initial public offering, which raised $16 billion, making it the biggest Internet IPO in history.

After the initial success of the IPO, the Facebook stock price dropped somewhat in the early days of trading, though Zuckerberg is expected to weather any ups and downs in his company's market performance.

Wife

Also in May 2012—one day after the IPO—Zuckerberg wed his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan. About 100 people gathered at the couple's Palo Alto, California home.

The guests thought they were there to celebrate Chan's graduation from medical school, but instead they witnessed Zuckerberg and Chan exchange vows.

One year later, Facebook made the Fortune 500 list for the first time—making Zuckerberg, at the age of 28, the youngest CEO on the list.

Daughter

In November 2015, Zuckerberg and Chan welcomed a daughter, Max, and Zuckerberg announced he would be taking two months of paternity leave to spend with his family. He and his wife also pledged in an open letter to their daughter that they would give 99 percent of their Facebook shares to charity.

"We are committed to doing our small part to help create this world for all children," the couple wrote in the open letter that was posted on Zuckerberg's Facebook page. "We will give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives to join many others in improving this world for the next generation."

In September 2016, Zuckerberg and Chan announced that the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), the company into which they put their Facebook shares, would invest at least $3 billion into scientific research over the next decade to help “cure, prevent and manage all diseases in our children's lifetime." Renowned neuroscientist Cori Bargmann of The Rockefeller University, was named the president of science at CZI.

They also announced the founding of Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a San Francisco-based independent research center that will bring together engineers, computer scientists, biologists, chemists and others in the scientific community. A partnership between Stanford University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley, Biohub will receive initial funding of $600 million over 10 years.

In March 2017, Zuckerberg and Chan announced on Facebook that they were expecting their second child. Daughter August was born on August 28.

The CEO has undertaken a personal challenge at the start of every year since 2009, with previous efforts including learning to speak Mandarin and only eating meat he had killed himself.

Fake News and Cambridge Analytica Scandal

After enduring criticism for the proliferation of fake news posts on his site leading up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg in early 2018 announced his personal challenge to develop improved methods for defending Facebook users from abuse and interference by nation-states.

"We won't prevent all mistakes or abuse, but we currently make too many errors enforcing our policies and preventing misuse of our tools," he wrote on his Facebook page. "If we're successful this year then we'll end 2018 on a much better trajectory."

However, Zuckerberg came under fire again a few months later when it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, had used private information from approximately 87 million Facebook profiles without the social network alerting its owners. The resulting outcry seemed to shake investors' confidence in Facebook, its shares dropping by 15 percent after the news became public.

Following a few days' silence, Zuckerberg surfaced on various outlets to explain how the company was taking steps to limit third-party developers' access to user information, and said he would be happy to testify before Congress. On Sunday, March 25, Facebook took out full-page ads in seven British and three American newspapers, penned in the form of a personal apology from Zuckerberg. He promised the company would investigate all of its apps, and remind users which ones they can shut off. "I’m sorry we didn’t do more at the time," he wrote. "I promise to do better for you."

Amid increasing calls for his resignation from investor groups, Zuckerberg traveled to Capitol Hill and met with lawmakers ahead of his two-day testimony, scheduled for April 10 and 11. The first day of hearings, with the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees, was considered a tame affair, with some senators seemingly struggling to understand the business model that powered the social media giant.

The follow-up hearing before House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee proved far testier, as its members grilled the Facebook CEO over privacy concerns. During the day's testimony, Zuckerberg revealed that his personal information was among the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica, and suggested that legal regulation of Facebook and other social media companies was "inevitable."

The negative PR seemingly did little to slow the company's progress, as Facebook rebounded to see its stock close at a record $203.23 on July 6. The surge bumped Zuckerberg past Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett to become the world's third-richest person, behind fellow tech titans Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates.

However, the gains were wiped out when Facebook shares dropped a staggering 19 percent on July 26, following an earnings report that revealed a failure to meet revenue expectations and slowing user growth, erasing nearly $16 billion of Zuckerberg's personal fortune in one day.

Info Source - Mark Zuckerberg

How did Mark Zuckerberg propose to Priscilla Chan?

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Dhaval Mehta

Studied Computer Science

heres the answer...

The Love Story of Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan

How is Mark Zuckerberg rich?

Divya Dave

Mark Zukerberg and Elon Musk!Well answer is because of us! Yes its true.There us no doubt that Facebook is one of the largest social network with billions of users! And still there is no doubt that Facebook founder MARK ZUKERBERG is considered as one of the billionaire in the world. But how? Advertising When users log in and share their information like interests or share their info on the site Mark there itself start earning the money your 1 Like on the advertisements on the Margins of the Facebook Mark charges the fees from the advertisers so basically we are the markers of him! Smart move isn't it? Facebook has tied up with more than 50 companies and startups! Most of them are most popularly used apps and startups. Like Instagram ,WhatsApp and many more. He believe to join all the great founders together!

How did Mark Zuckerberg manage to own 25% of Facebook?

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Patrick Mathieson

Venture investor @ Toba CapitalGenerally speaking, these are the levers you can pull to minimize dilution during fundraising: * Don't raise a ton of money. * Negotiate a high valuation. * Wait until you can negotiate a high valuation to raise a ton of money (this is just restating the first two points). Let's see how this played out for Facebook using data that was helpfully organized by Dealbook: * Angel round (2004): $500k raised at a ~$5M cap, so +/- 10% dilution in exchange for sufficient funds to really begin developing & growing the platform. The team saves money by living/working together in a house in Palo Alto, taking pretty low or nonexistent salaries, et cetera. Good move. * Series A (2005): $12.7M raised at a ~$80M valuation, which is ~15% dilution. At this point the userbase was growing so briskly that valuation jumpe.

How many hours a week does Mark Zuckerberg actually work at the Facebook office?

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Lee Byron·Updated May 19, 2014Worked at Facebook (company) (2008–2018)Originally Answered: Mark Zuckerberg, how many hours a week do you actually work at the Facebook office?

I sit near Mark at FBHQ so I'll speak from my experience.

He often arrives every morning before I do and is around after dinner working as well. I would say he is in the office roughly 9-10 hours a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes we have particularly exciting projects going on that have people volunteering their weekends and Mark might come by and see how things are going.

Mark occasionally travels and isn't in the office, but it seems like it's more likely that his appointments come to our headquarters than vice versa.

I should say that it's great to have him around with regularity and that he chooses to have the same desk set up as everyone else. He takes his job very seriously not just as a businessman but as a leader; he has helped keep our company culture what it is.

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What is it like to code with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Saket Pundlik

forever oldComing from a person with a non-coding background, it must be like: * Playing chess with Gary Kasparov * Acting with Marlon Brando * Singing with Frddie Mercury * Playing guitar with Jimi Hendrix * And most importantly, arguing with Sheldon Cooper First you will feel honoured, then you will be humbled.

What kind of car does Mark Zuckerberg drive?

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Jason McHenry·

Lives in Los Altos, CA

He is known to have a few but his daily driver is a black Volkswagen Golf MK6 GTI. He really ‘likes’ having dinner at Sumika in Los Altos and I see him ‘check in’ there kind of often.

And since he thinks it’s okay to play fast and loose with people’s private information I wonder how he’d feel if people were to, say, share a photo of his license plates or something? That’d probably not be very cool.

What are Mark Zuckerberg's strengths?

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Mohammed Raiyyan

looking for facebook internshipGreetings..!! Okay lets hop into the answer Zuck is likable & very friendly: Great posture in both the physical and philanthropic senses. Very intelligent yet seems down-to-earth and humble. Lacks at classic professionalism in day-to-day dressing but makes up for that with attitude and clean, neat clothing as well as good posture. Did I mention great posture? :) 1. He has a vision His vision was that of a more open and connected world. And throughout the growth of Facebook, he has stuck to his vision - that of a product that offers value while connecting people and building a world with more empathy. From the beginning, the frugal-living Zuckerberg was never in it for the money> He had a larger vision and not only thought ahead of where he wanted to take Facebook, but pushed himself and his te(more)

What is Mark Zuckerberg like in person?

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Marc Alessandro IV

Started an online business at 14 sold it 6 years later for an undisclosed amountJust like any other person. He doesn't talk about his wealth; money, cars, what have you. He's really down to Earth. He also doesn't really talk about business. We usually talk about mundane things, or about programming. It's also worth mentioning that I meet Zuckerberg in 08' 09'. It was a different world, but he was still very humble So in the end, he's just like you or me. He's just worth billions of dollars. I almost forgot he does talk alot about the books he is currently reading.

What advice did Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz give Adam D'Angelo when he was leaving Facebook to start Quora?

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Manish Kumar Srivastav

Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India (2012–present)

Spread knowledge.

The immense contribution and change that Quora has brought is lowering the communication gap between pizzled and achievers. Your questions can be directly answered by prominent people. I feel that's immensely helpful to society.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg have a 99% approval rating from his employees?

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Amir Memon

Muslim, Software Engineer

Because he is just that awesome.

There are several reasons why we "approve" of him:

  • The story: He built this billion user and billion dollar company from his dorm room, overcame one obstacle after another, and assembled a company with some of the most talented employees in the world.
  • The principles: He is dead-focused on "making the world more open and connected." The guy doesn't waver; all the investments in R&D and acquisitions have been along these lines.
  • The heart: He was the biggest donor of 2013, and is generally a minimalist. He is clearly committed to Internet.org, even though that's not necessarily where the short term revenue increases are. We really feel he wants to change the world for the better.
  • The guts: What other CEO has the... guts... to purchase a chat company for $19B??? It's a very smart purchase for various reasons, but still, $19B! Even other Silicon Valley CEOs acknowledge Zuck's fearlessness: http://read.bi/1n24ctW
  • The wisdom: When we hear him speak, he gives us brain wrinkles. He has this uncanny ability to make all the right strategic moves, and when he explains the reasons for making those moves, it simply makes sense. Sure, mistakes have been made, and hindsight is 20/20, but at decision time, it was for all the right reasons.
  • The trust: He doesn't make all the decisions, in fact far from it. We feel entrusted and empowered to drive our features the way we feel is best for the people that use Facebook. This is drastically different from many top-down corporations. We're happy with the balance between management-mandated and grass-roots-inspired decision making.
  • The character: He wears T-Shirts and jeans, talks with humility, and he just seems generally very approachable. We like that.
  • The business: Facebook is a rock solid business that is rapidly increasing in revenue as we speak. It makes more than 70% more in revenue than it was making just one year ago.
  • The free food and perks: Yes, this makes us like him and the company too. He has the ability to put an end to it at any time, but he keeps it coming :-). If somebody gives me free cookies, I like them, this part is not rocket science.


And, no, having a lower approval rating is not a good thing. People don't "approve" because they agree with everything, rather they know that they have a say, and that their opinion matters. It's a good thing to like your boss.

What are some of the evil aspects of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Vlad Usatii

Created readproduct.com to help users connect and share.

Mark Zuckerberg is an amazing entrepreneur.

But there is a point that all entrepreneurs get to where their attitude gets in the way of innovation. Mark is one of the few CEOs who doesn’t care about other brands. He wants his brand to succeed, but no one else's.

He isn’t moral — this is evident in how he views the world, crushing competition with simply upping ad pricing and upping gig posts on international job boards. If a brand is getting in the way with Facebook, he will straight up buy the business and never look back.

If someone will crush innovation and expansion, it may as well be the guy that doesn’t allow others to compete or innovate alongside him.

If we look at Zuck’s upbringing, he wanted to be a psychologist. This meant that, growing up, Mark had his own view on morality and even created websites to showcase the human psyche and its drawbacks. He stole a revolutionary idea from the one guy who dreamed it all up, made its premise into his own, and even told reporters something along the lines of: ‘I simply used the idea and made it better, as it was heading nowhere in the hands of the former.’

Zuck was a nerd, and with most nerds, there may be a root problem at hand. It could be that they don’t believe their knowledge tree is good enough, that their knowledge may be halted by the immediate realization that they aren’t the best, or it could simply be an inferiority complex, held down by the heightened social standing that stands as a proxy before their actions. Zuck created more and more and never looked at his haters or competition; he stomped competition with unethical, but ‘legal’ behavior, and created a storm of confusion among the crowd.

Some hate him for the fact that he looks like a psychopath (and nothing else to back the claim), but they may implicitly — instinctually — feel some sort of distrust in him because they deserve to think so.

After all, instinct has brought us this far.

Maybe Zuck will change, but his businesses will never stop behaving this way — the community has already been shaped.

What were the highlights of Mark Zuckerberg's testimony to Congress?

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Liam Ryan

Studied Master MarinerThe Highlights! – Well there were quite a few. I think seeing the equivalent of a linguistic gymnastics routine that finished with a big “Fuck You” “Shit Happens” and “Get over It” was probably the winner. Now I must confess this is not something I would usually take an interest in, nor would I usually watch but I wondered if Mr. Zuckerberg was going to try and explain what happened and the reasons why or just issue hollow meaningless words that looked to all appearances to have the veneer of an apology with no admissions of any wrong doing, which, is exactly what we got. Mr. Zuckerberg was able to emotionally frame his words in terms of a lack of action by saying “But it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough” What a nice linguistic trick to cover-up of the theft of our personal data by Camb(more)

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Mark Zuckerberg

How much is the per-day income of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Jeff Wilsbacher

Bay Area Native and lifelong residentAs a founder, he doesn’t trade time for money like most folks. Instead, he gets “a piece of the action” and gets to arbitrage other people's work and other people’s money. He makes money by buying low (people time/work) and selling high (advertizing/attention), and by organizing that work and sales. His net worth is around 70 billion. Today (2019, November 11) He was born 12,959 days ago. So, every day that he’s been alive he’s “made” around $5,401,651.36 every day (on average) since being born. But that’s pretty deceptive since he could have not started Facebook and gone on to do non-arbitrage work like most of us. He started Facebook 2004, February 4 (5,754 days ago). Using that start date he’s made around $12,165,450.12 a day. But that too might be deceptive since Facebook went public on 20(more)

How much of Facebook does Mark Zuckerberg own?

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Nat Burgess

Lives in Seattle, WA

In this matter, control is more interesting that dollars. Facebook structured its public offering so that Mark Zuckerberg retained over 50% of the voting shares in the company. The result is that Zuckerberg owns a minority of the fully diluted total shares outstanding, but a majority of the voting shares. Investors are skeptical of this type of arrangement because increases their risk. As shareholders they take financial risk on the value of the shares, but do not have an opportunity to participate in governance. For an individual investor this might not be a meaningful issue, but for large institutions that rely on active (and sometimes hostile) investors to force companies to take action, this is a high-risk scenario. Facebook was considered valuable enough that investors were willing to take the risk at the point of the IPO. Facebook has outperformed the market, and has not been targeted by activist investors.

Facebook listed Class A shares in their IPO. As of June 30, 2020, 2.879 billion Class A shares traded on NASDAQ. Class A shares have one vote per share. Class B shares, which are not traded on any public exchange, have 10 votes per share. Mark Zuckerberg owns approximately 57.9% of the Class B shares. Another approximately 12.5% are held by close friends and allies.

Zuckerberg owns just over 400 million shares total, valued on Friday 9/11/20 at approximately $105 billion.4.2K viewsView 4 upvotes ·

What programming languages does Mark Zuckerberg know?

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Douglas Green

Works at Gleim PublicationsAccording to what appears to be his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder), he is a third-level C++ programmer. I also found an interesting source FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002 where his areas of expertise were apparently listed on his RentACoder profile as "Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C++, Java, Javascript, and ASP". Presumable he also knows PHP/Hack from working at Facebook. I didn't find any mention of him knowing Python, though.

How does Mark Zuckerberg earn money through WhatsApp, as it is free and doesn’t even have ads?

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Moez Chandani·May 2, 2017Management Consultant. I enjoy studying businesses.

He doesn't. At least not right now.

Whatsapp currently has no revenue source. It originally began with a subscription based model where users were charged $0.99 a year to use the service. However, that's not a sustainable business model. Most of its 1.2 billion users (especially in developing nations) won't pay this amount, and Whatsapp would risk being overtaken by competitors who might offer similar services for free. This business model was therefore ditched.

Further, Whatsapp has traditionally been very very serious about maintaining customer privacy. One of its founders (and the current CEO of Whatsapp) Jan Koum grew up in USSR in the 80's where the government monitored nearly every action of its citizens, and this experience led him to take privacy seriously.[1] Whatsapp doesn't store chats on its servers, and all chats are end-to-end encrypted. They do not sell information about users to third party advertisers and in all probability will not do so in the near future.

However, Facebook will monetize Whatsapp in some form in the future (after all it's paid $19 billion for the app). Whatsapp can borrow a few ideas from Tencent which is hugely successful & highly profitable in China. Here are some possible avenues:

a) Incorporate mobile payments: This is probably going to happen in the near future. There was a flurry of news last month that Whatsapp may incorporate a UPI based payment system in India[2] . Basically, imagine PayTM and Whatsapp being integrated into a single app. You can settle bills with your friends, pay for your Uber rides, and pay at restaurants using your Whatsapp account. Whatsapp would earn money via transaction charges which would be levied on businesses WeChat has a similar service called WePay which is quite popular.

b) Use it for customer support: Whatsapp could also serve as a customer support tool. This is also something that should happen in the near future. Facebook has stated that they would

…test tools that allow you to use Whatsapp to communicate with businesses and organizations that you want to hear from.That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight.

Nearly every app today has a chat based support system integrated in it. Imagine replacing all of these with a Whatsapp based customer support system where you can contact companies directly from Whatsapp. It would simplify the process significantly. It would also be more efficient than tagging companies in tweets and posting on their Facebook pages to get attention.

c) Use it as a business tool: Another possible use here would be targeted messaging. Businesses could send targeted advertising messages to users who have specifically allowed these businesses to contact them. This could act as a replacement to sending emails or app notifications to users. So Zomato could offer special discounts to users who have enabled this service by sending them a Whatsapp message or by using the recently added Status tab on the app. Or MakeMyTrip could inform users about its latest offers via a Whatsapp Status.

d) Mobile gaming : WeChat in China earns most of its revenue from games incorporated in the app. While I am personally skeptical about how successful mobile games in apps would be in other countries, it can certainly be an option worth exploring.

In summary, while Whatsapp earns limited to no revenue currently, there is enough scope in the app to generate revenues via value added services.

Footnotes[1] Setting the record straight[2] WhatsApp will reportedly launch peer-to-peer payments in India within 6 months8.3K viewsView 25 upvotes25What was Mark Zuckerberg like in high school?

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Lee Zhen Fung

Came to write, stayed to work

Just your every day geek. But he was quite engrossed in coding and even at one point had a tutor to teach him.

However, before you go and start learning to code, note that coding today and yesterday were both very different. He programmed the first FB prototype in months. Every programmer has his own set of code directives or designs,just as every carpenter has his tools. Presently we have lots of languages like coffeescript, python and ruby which might produce a similar Facebook clone faster.

I think Facebook now has its own language, considering the many data logistical challenges it faces, which might not be easily overcome by conventional code languages.12.4K viewsView 14 upvotes ·

When Mark Zuckerberg first began building Facebook, what were his strengths and weaknesses as a developer?

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Andy Vraun

I have read extensively about Facebook although I haven't worked at FB .

Strengths

1.Product driven approach : When start-ups start getting noticed there is significant pressure from the investors to get a revenue model and for FB, it was surely advertising. But Zuckerberg was adamant that he needs to build a cool product above anything else and so revenue wasn't any of his focus.

2.Fantastic Web Programming skills: He had already built a few successful products on the web and had a good knowledge of both system programming (logs....etc) and web.

3. Belief in his Idea: He faced a huge backlash from the users who felt uncomfortable with the news feed. But Zuckerberg was adamant on not rolling it back, he felt it was basic to what FB really was and then now, it is in facebook's core.

Weaknesses

1. Poor communication Skills: If you are a developer or anything else poor communication is always bad. His handling of internal matters was poor.

2. Rigidity in his beliefs (Rude): FB had their employees wear cool jeans (Think for a 40 year old man) to make FB appear as a cool place. He insulted some investors which , to a guy of his exposure was unprofessional.

How did Mark Zuckerberg learn to run a 200 billion dollar company?

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Richard Garand

Studying reality to prepare for the testOriginally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg learn how to run a 200 billion dollar company?

There is no set of skills that guarantees you can run any large company (sorry, MBAs!).

The foundation is understanding what is important in that business. Mark Zuckerberg probably can't run Procter & Gamble or an airline because their priorities are very different and not what he is good at.

What makes him good at understanding Facebook's priorities? Probably a combination of:

  • His natural interests aligned with what ended up being important in Facebook
  • His experience testing other ideas prior to starting Facebook, and then running Facebook, showed him what users value and how they react
  • Facebook's dominance means the market is defined by its priorities to some degree, further making his ideas more valuable

Having that foundation, and spending a lot of time translating it into action, typically means that you will be among the most influential people in whatever position you choose to work (employee, speaker, author, entrepreneur, consultant, or anything else).

However that's not enough. It might work if you're on your own or running a 10-person company. To run a $200 billion company is far more challenging and requires some additional skills to support the points above (in theory, this is what an MBA is about).

At that size you will face pretty much every challenge imaginable except those not applicable to your company / industry -- for example Facebook's latest quarterly report shows that they aren't feeling the effects of an economic slowdown because of their constant growth, so they don't have to manage business cycles yet.

Although many people share some part of these challenges, the unique ones tend to involve leadership and influence. Internally the CEO has to make sure all the employees understand what they need to do without being able to talk to each of them. Externally the CEO has to represent the company with the image that supports it in different areas such as marketing, government policy, and recruitment.

On top of this the CEO has to avoid being isolated by their influence and power. It can actually be difficult to understand what's really going on with employees and customers when you get most of your information from people whose boss is a billionaire (and thus are more careful about what they say).

Every CEO of a large company had to learn these at some point. Mark Zuckerberg just put them into practice a little faster, and handled it very well.

There is only one way you can do that: with help from other people. This includes talking with CEOs in a similar position, having mentoring from investors or retired CEOs, and hiring people who are good at managing their area and making the most of it while contributing to the company's bigger goals.

It also takes a lot of personal skills since you will have to admit you are wrong often, manage your time effectively, and work well with many other people. Very good advisors and mentors can also help with these if you have a certain level of willingness to begin with.

Finally to put this all together it takes a very high level of drive. Although some of these things may seem to come naturally a lot of them will be difficult. Very few people are willing to put forth the level of effort over a long time that it takes to do this.6.2K viewsView 18 upvotes18

What time does Mark Zuckerberg go to bed?

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Sean Dean

Blogs about getting better sleep

Mark Zuckerberg famous sleeps very little and is a bit of a night owl. When he was programming about 10 years ago, he would keep 'programming hours' and stay up until 6 am or even 8am.

Mark Zuckerberg, photo taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zuckerberg

Now, he has to keep more orthodox business hours so has to get up earlier as you point out. It is reported he only sleeps for five hours a night, so that would mean if he now gets up at 5 am, he would go to bed at 12 am.

Source: Amazing – 10 Successful People Who Hardly Sleep

Check this out if you're interested in becoming an entrepreneur947.2K viewsView 713 upvotes71326

From where do Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg get their intelligence?

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Adam Pittenger

CEO of Moved (moved.com). Building, learning, writing.

It's difficult to say that their intelligence from X, Y, or Z. It's not so black and white.

First - It's important to note that intelligence comes in many forms. Some people might say "Book Smarts vs Street Smarts" but that barely scratches the surface.

For example, looking at the guys mentioned in the question, it is largely regarded that Mark Zuckerberg is a superior technical talent than Steve Jobs ever was. Jobs, however, was an incredible marketer and public speaker; something Zuck has had to work on over the years. So, while Jobs' level of social and emotional intelligence was probably much greater than Zuck's, Mark is more capable of working with his team to come up with the best technical solution for his product.

So... who is smarter? As you can see, the line is blurred.

All of this leads to saying that: the general term of "intelligence" here is probably better defined as the sum of their "strengths".

Each has their own strengths (and weaknesses, of course) that have made them successful entrepreneurs. This can be writing code, negotiating a deal, developing a strategy, etc.


Now that we've framed this, the real question is..
"How did their strengths become such strengths?"

  • CURIOSITY.
    These guys are hungry for knowledge. Hungry to better themselves and and learn as much as they can. Read, read, read... and read some more. You'll soak in so much and retain more than you realize. Doing so will lead to "lightbulb moments" later on, as your brain starts to make connections that others don't.
  • PRACTICE.
    Like any sport or craft, you get better with experience. So you have to just go out there and do it. The more you do it, the better you become. Were any of these guys great CEOs from Day 1? No. They may have qualities that made them okay, but I'm sure they were better CEOs after Year 1, Year 2, etc.
  • NETWORK.
    Lean on others. Generally, unless they suck, the people around you will want to help. You should continue to build your network with smart, experienced people that you can trust. (Make sure you're helping them as well!) This creates a healthy back-and-forth where, given your lack of knowledge or experience in a certain area, you can tap your network to get some help and guidance.


As mentioned above, my response here barely scratches the surface of the much larger topic of "intelligence". It's a topic I love to explore and am constantly fascinated with at a personal level.

Ultimately, if you want to be an entrepreneur - go be one. If you want to be like those guys - work your ass off and do it.

Never stop learning. Never stop improving.2.5K viewsView 10 upvotes · Answer requested by Jason Silvermann10

How intelligent is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Paul McDonnell

Director and Founder at AIGaming.com (2017–present)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg?

Mark Zuckerberg is ridiculously, pretty much off the charts smart.

  • Learnt programming at a very young age when this was much harder to do.
  • Even at this young age was applying programming to interesting problems for example when he created a network connecting his dad’s dental office to his home office.
  • Launched Facebook when so many smart people were trying to do something similar and made a success of it without previous comparable business experience.
  • Possibly the most outstanding: buying Instagram for a price which most at the time assumed to be ridiculously over priced but has turned out to be just the opposite:
  • Here’s why Facebook’s $1 billion Instagram acquisition was such a great deal
  • Continues to dominate the social media space after such a long time.

The breadth of skill this man has is what really gets me. He cannot be boxed into one category: there are many great software developers, but he is one whilst understanding user acquisition and retention like almost no one else.11.8K viewsView 17 upvotes171

Would you vote for Mark Zuckerberg if he ran for president?

What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg was born in India?

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Shubhi Agarwal

Voracious Reader and Super FoodieOriginally Answered: What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg were born in India?

Had Mark Zuckerburg been born in India, he would not have got into IITs, i guess. That's because just a very good interest and curiosity into computers or programming is definitely not a prerequisite to clear IITJEE. And what I have read about him, he would not have slogged for 2 years mugging up school and coaching curriculum for Phy, Cem and Math. So he would have been in a 2nd-3rd tier engineering college, or may have even taken a Humanities course.

Meanwhile he would have kept his curiosity getting the better of him, by learning from other sources on internet (having found his interest wavering to programming/hacking et al), and doing his self-study and experimentation. Probably, he would even have become an intern at a startup or an IT major. Given that, he would have developed on his computing skills on his own, he may even have got hired by the company.

Having partially learnt there by using their resources, and partially by his own mind, he would have created a similar (if not exactly same) prototype, and would have got support from his current employers to take it ahead. And in few years time (slower than the actual case), he would have slowly come into picture, with his own little startup.

India is full of such IT startups, where people started small, and slownly gained momentum. It would require longer than Harvard, but would not be an impossibility, given the guy's hunger to get something working for himself, by hook or by crook. :)

P.S. This is taking into picture the scenario, where Zuckerburg was born in an average middle class family and can afford a decent education.1.7K viewsView 4 upvotes42Is Mark Zuckerberg really a visionary?

Syed Usama Ahmed

Indian in CanadaOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg really that visionary?

Yes of course he is and any CEO would be to take his company to new heights and new platforms. He reveled his grand vision about For The Next 10 Years Of Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg said that next year Facebook would be making a series of aggressive talent and ad-tech investments that would set it up for a successful future.

But that could mean Facebook's expenses increase up to 70%.

Zuckerberg also outlined his three-, five-, and 10-year plan for the company.

In summary, he wants to have multiple Facebook products — WhatsApp, Messenger, Search, Video, NewsFeed, Oculus, and Instagram — each connect 1 billion users. Once those have reached mass scale, then he'll start to aggressively monetize them.

He also wants to improve the advertising experience for brands, particularly on mobile. Facebook will be investing in ways to better target and measure campaigns through data. It wants to help brands measure online to offline sales conversions. Currently, advertisers spend only about 11% of their budgets on mobile, according to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, because the right tools aren't in place.

Finally, Facebook wants to build the next major computing platform, which Zuckerberg believes could be augmented reality and Oculus. He also wants to bring the internet to more people through Internet.org.

"We're going to prepare for the future by investing aggressively," Zuckerberg said.

"The strength of the business today is putting us in a strong position to invest in the future," Wehner added.

Here's the transcript of Zuckerberg's plan, Seeking Alpha:

On previous calls, you’ve heard me talk about our big company goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms. These goals are important for us and part of our foundation of our strategy for the next decade, but achieving these will involve many different efforts and steps along the way, some that will be achieved rapidly and others that are going to take longer.

So with that in mind, I’d like to run through our progress this quarter on the different efforts that we expect to deliver a lot of impact over the next three, five and 10 years.

Let's begin with our three-year goals. Over the next three years, our main goals are around continuing to grow and serve our existing communities and businesses and help them reach their full potential.

When you look at the size and engagement of our community, our progress remains very strong. 864 million use Facebook every day and across our core products, we continue to see huge engagement. For example around 700 million people now use Facebook Groups every month. Achieving this scale shows that we're delivering experiences for the way that people want to share and connect.

Another example is our progress on public content. Last quarter I talked about how we're working to connect people around important public moments and personalities on Facebook. This quarter we've continued to build on our results and there are now more than 1 billion interactions every week between public figures and their fans on Facebook.

The investments we have made in video have also played a big part here. This quarter we announced a new milestone for video on Facebook achieving 1 billion video views, a day of made of videos. During the summers the ice bucket challenge drew more than 10 billion video views by 440 million people which is a good sign of how far our video product has come.

Instagram has also made a lot of progress this quarter. In August, the Instagram team launched Hyperlapse, a standalone app for time lapse of videos on iOS. The team has also invested heavily in improving the speed and performance of Instagram on Android. This has helped drive Instagram's strong international growth which in some countries has achieved more than 100% year-over-year growth. Globally, people using Instagram now spend around 21 minutes a day on average using the app. This is a strong figure compared to the industry and a good sign that Instagram's strategy is on the right path. Our other big focus over the next three years is to continue to serving businesses well and creating a lot of value for marketers.

As our results show, our approach here is working. To continue delivering value for businesses, we work to improve the quality of ads and news feed by reducing low quality content and improving our targeting to show more timely and relevant content. We’ve also made some big advances in our ad tech, most importantly the launch of our new Atlas platform. Atlas offers marketers a lot of new capabilities to help reach people across devices, platforms and publishers as well as improving measurement in online campaign. We're very excited for the future of Atlas and Cheryl is going to talk more about this in a moment.

Next, let's talk about our strategy over the next five years. Over the next five years, our goals are around taking our next generation of services, Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp and Search and helping them connect billions of people and become important businesses in their own right.

One big priority for us here is messaging. And continuing to build and grow Messenger and now WhatsApp as well as great services. This quarter we made an important change to our mobile messaging efforts by transitioning people to Messenger on iOS, Android and Windows Phone. We believe that this change allows us to offer a better and faster messaging experience on mobile, and our data shows that people who use Messenger, usually respond to messages about 20% faster.

This month we also completed our acquisition of WhatsApp. I'm excited to be working with this team and John to join our Board. WhatsApp continues to be on a path to connect more than 1 billion people around the world and we're going to be working into accelerate their efforts here. Another key part of our strategy is helping developers to build more great social experiences on our platform.

Over the next few years, our goal is to make Facebook a cross-platform platform that allows developers to build, grow and monetize their apps across every major mobile platform. We’ve continued to make good progress here. This quarter, we opened our audience networks to all developers and publishers, allowing over 1.5 million advertisers on Facebook to extend their campaigns across mobile and for developers to begin monetizing their apps.

We're also excited by the continued adoption of App Links, our deep-linking technology for mobile apps. App Links is now used by hundreds of apps across iOS, Android and Windows phone and in just the past six months, the developers have created links to more than 3 billion individual destinations in these apps.

Now let's talk about how we're approaching our goals over the next 10 years.For the next 10 years our focus is on driving the fundamental changes in the world that we need to achieve our mission, connecting the whole world, understanding a world with big leaps in AIs and developing the next generation of platforms, especially in computing.

This is a very big period, a very busy period for our efforts with Internet.org. In July we worked with Airtel to launch the Internet.org app in Zambia. This provides free data access to a set of basic internet services for health, education, employment and communication. The results from this are very encouraging. We've already heard a lot amazing stories about how people are using the internet to add value to their lives. We hope to bring Most Popular Websites & Email|Good Home Page|Top 500 Sites|The Internet.org app to many more countries soon.

Over the last few months, I've also travelled to several countries and met with policy makers, key distributors and people and communities that are coming online for the first time. Increasingly industry and governments are seeing expanding internet access as one of their core priorities. This is positive development for our work with Internet.org in our long-term goal of connecting everyone in the world.

Finally, let's talk for a minute about our progress of Oculus. As I've said before, with Oculus, we're making a long-term bet on the future of computing. Every 10 to 15 years, a new major computing platform arrives and we think that virtual and augmented reality are important parts of this upcoming next platform. This quarter, Oculus continued to make progress towards this vision.

In September, the first Oculus developer conference took place, where we announced a new prototype VR headset on the path of a consumer version of the Rift. We continue to see a lot of excitement in the developer community and we've now shipped more than 100,000 of Rift developer kit to over a 130 countries. It's still early for Oculus but we are encouraged to see the variety of apps and games being developed for this platform.

Internet.org and Oculus are just two of the huge opportunities ahead. Our efforts here will take longer to achieve their full impact, but we're going to continue preparing for the future by investing aggressively. So that’s how we’re approaching our strategy over the next three, five and 10 years, while focusing on our big goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms.

This has been a quarter with strong results. I want to thank the entire Facebook community, our employees, our partners and our stockholders for their continued support. Because of your contribution, Facebook continues to grow in strength and to create greater value in the world for people, partners and businesses. We have a long journey ahead, we’re on the right path and I'm excited about the progress that we’re making.

Originally Answered: Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

OK I got this.
WHy do you think that mark zuckerberg is on Quora? Do you think is he here because he has no other work to do,or just for passing time or for increasing his credits? No,my dear friend,Mark is not in the need of any credits,he alerady has a multi-billlion dollar company. I'll tell you why he is here:
Just take a view at the questions asked by him.
He is here to know about how people are responding to facebook,which he can never,ever know on facebook. He can get free,cheap feedback here on quora which would be impossible and much expensive to implement on facebook. So why not use quora,where anxious people are dying to answer for free?
Plus he is here to know about his rival companies, microsoft,foursquare etc. In short,he is here just for a free for all survey for which there does not exist a better platform than this. Please have a look at the link i provided to the questions asked by him.2.9K viewsView 9 upvotesView shares91

Is Keiana Cavé the next Elon Musk/Mark Zuckerberg?

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Brian Farley

Molecular biologist turned biotech data scientist

This is what we’ve come to, friends. Because I’m not terribly interested in being sued for libel, I declare that everything contained in this answer expresses my personal opinion.

I mean no disrespect to Keiana, but the feel-good story of the young, brilliant, entrepreneurial “scientist” is a perennial, egregious failure of science “journalism”. Every year, it seems as though there’s yet another plucky high school senior who has invented and intends to sell a product that will change the world. The cesspool of reportage surrounding the budding scientist breathlessly lionizes their youth and ambition while granting only a passing mention — a sentence or two at best — to what they actually did.

This is an incredible disservice to both the scientific community and the public at large. First, it commits (in my opinion) the cardinal sin of science reporting: focusing on the scientist at the expense of the science. I understand that the ultimate goal of most reporting these days is to attract eyeballs and clicks to drive the rate at which the attention of readers can be sold to the highest bidder, and that narratives like these are easy viral feel-good stories. Who isn’t moved by the potential of extremely gifted students? However, because these stories represent such cherished narratives, scientific due diligence doesn’t happen.

It is precisely when we have a vested interest in something being true that we are compelled to be as skeptical about it as possible. However, the needs and wants of mass media and the general public are at cross purposes to scientific skepticism, so it doesn’t happen.

Perhaps the most egregious example of the media failing to do their homework and valuing personal narratives over scientific soundness is Jack Andraka, the Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer. Essentially, at the age of 15, Jack Andraka claimed to have invented a cheap, reliable test for pancreatic cancer and was celebrated by a wide variety of outlets. However, the test was founded on flawed science, didn’t work as promised, and was never fully described in a way that allowed for expert vetting. However, by investing so much effort and praise in Jack Andraka the scientist instead of Jack Andraka’s flawed science, the media put itself in an untenable position that was difficult to back out of.

I don’t believe that this is happening in this specific case, but this is one of the major pitfalls associated with this style of reporting. Celebrating the scientist before the science itself is vetted is irresponsible at best, and disgusting free advertising for a product at worst.

Secondly, any celebratory narrative about individual scientists (regardless of their age) is wrong. Contemporary science is not performed by individuals in isolation, but instead by large collaborative teams. Singling out one or even a few individuals for recognition is not only unfair to other members of the team, but is also a misrepresentation of how science is performed (but, hey, a charismatic representative helps sell product, so I understand why it happens).

Third, and perhaps worst, is that stories like these completely and totally undercut the reality that scientific research is HARD. Meaningful contributions to science are not and can not be made by solo actors over a six month span. This isn’t because insights are particularly difficult to come by, but instead, because the grinding path to making sure that your favorite ideas and hypotheses are correct requires meticulous experimentation to rule out as many reasonable competing hypotheses as you can think of. Being brilliant isn’t enough; you also have to be hard-working, dedicated, and meticulous. Science is and should be slow, because there’s too much at stake to rush and be wrong — but the science “journalism” that describes these discoverers is a significant threat to that.

Whenever you see a story like this reported by the mainstream media, you shouldn’t feel good — you should be angry.22.8K viewsView 213 upvotesView shares213328

How can I send Mark Zuckerberg a message he will read?

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Alon Amit

Former Product Manager (Ads) at Facebook (company)The short but honest answer is that you can't. There isn't any scalable way Zuck could let anyone in the world message him privately and read all those messages. Even if you happen to guess his personal e-mail address or work e-mail address, the chances that he'll read a message from someone he doesn't know and is not referred by anyone he does know are very, very small. This isn't because he's mean or indifferent - it's just because he's a highly visible individual with a particularly large number of people who wish to communicate with him, for a wide variety of reasons. Whatever it is you wish to achieve by sending Mark Zuckerberg a private message, there are possibly other approaches which are a lot more likely to be successful. Not knowing anything about your goal, it's hard to sugges.

Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in "The Social Network"?

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Jimmy Wales

Wikipedia, Wikia, WikiTribuneOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in the movie "The Social Network"?

I know a few of the people who are depicted in the movie including Mark Zuckerberg and Sean Parker. I have heard some people comment on the movie in a way that I think is accurate: the worst thing about the movie is that as a movie it is actually pretty good, which means that it tells a compelling story.

Unfortunately, not much of that story is actually true.

Let's take one of the key elements of the movie - the suggestion that Mark created Facebook because a girl dumped him. There's that silly "Rosebud" (reference to Citizen Kane) moment at the end when he's shown sadly reloading her profile page. It's a great story, could come straight out of a dramatic Bollywood movie, but it actually has no resemblance to reality. Mark is still married to the woman he was dating when he started Facebook.

If you think Mark is obsessed with money, for example, you're missing the point there as well. I remember once sitting at a table with him, the Google guys, etc., and they were all talking about their jets. As one does, haha. I turned to Mark and said "Do you have a jet?" And he responded with genuine bewilderment: "How would I ever have a jet?" Facebook was already huge and valued in the billions. For all I know, he may have one by now (and why not?), but it wasn't of any interest to him and not a goal that he held.

Similarly, Sean Parker's character in the movie is not really accurate. It has some semblance of accuracy in a way. Sean does like to throw extravagant parties. But what is missing is his cleverness and basic sense of humanity. Do you know what he likes to talk about privately? Money, babes, power? No, actually, he's really got strong academic interests in medical research. He's a geek, and I mean that in the good way.

So, I would approach the movie as fiction - entertaining fiction - but try not to let it color your understanding of the people involved.

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What is it like to be interviewed by Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ashwin AJ

Being Engineer I only have experience of giving interview...Originally written by: Charlie Cheever At a birthday party in Belltown (a neighborhood of Seattle,) I ran into Dave Fetterman and Andrew 'Boz' Bosworth who I knew from school, and they had some news: "Guess what? We're quitting our jobs at Microsoft and going down to Silicon Valley to work at Facebook!" I liked Fetterman and Boz and thought they were smart and hearing this made me think that Facebook might actually be a legitimate company where I might find good people to work with. I ended up searching through my Blackberry for the e-mail Facebook had sent me and replying to it from the party. When I interviewed at Facebook, I remember being especially impressed by Dustin and Adam and the plans they outlined for what could be done next with Facebook, in particular news feed. Also, James.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg cover his headphone jack with tape?

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Hafiz Rahman

Worked at EntrepreneurshipI covered my laptop's cam for years since I first found out how easy it was to plant a malware on someone's computer. In my case, I planted one on my friend's PC from a video attachment she requested through YM back in my college days. It was just a joke but then I realized that I could turn on her webcam without her knowing (she had a webcam with no lights on it). I could browse her PC, listen to her while she types, copy some files and even make the system crash. I removed the malware straightaway before I think of anything worse. At that time, I thought "if I can do it with little effort, why couldn't those with better hacking skills do a lot worse?" But success at first try didn't stop me just yet. I tried several more times to different people I know, and succeed in some but failed.

What kind of cellphone does Mark Zuckerberg use?

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BIll Wanfeng·

Lived in ChinaOriginally Answered: Which phone does Mark Zuckerberg use the most?

must be iphone10K viewsView 13 upvotes132

Has money and power corrupted Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ron Maimon·

Lives in New York CityPeople are not corrupted by money and power, at least not in the naive way it is imagined. They are always just doing what they think is best, but when their company becomes enormous, their power becomes enormous, so they tend to engage in terribly desctructive behavior, but this is behavior that would not be predatory and harmful if their business were small, under those circumstances it would be beneficial. Acquiring a competitor and merging is not a problem for two small businesses. It sometimes makes sense. But gobbling up a small competitor when you are a giant means subjecting the management of the company to the dominance of an external bureaucracy which no one person is fully in control of. This squelches the creativity of the small company, in no small part because you have made a(more)

Does Mark Zuckerberg believe in privacy?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

Do not take this as an official statement from or about Facebook's stance towards privacy. It is also written in the form of an answer towards Anon User's comment in Blake Ross's answer below.

I don't really know what Zuck's approach to privacy is, but I do think he has a more nuanced and insightful view of it than most people do.

I do think that his product policies around privacy do more to reflect what he is reading from user desires (not advertisers and certainly not profit-seeking - the most naive interpretation of Facebook's privacy policies is that they are somehow driven by a desire for profit [1]) than anything else. Users ("average people") don't really think about privacy very deeply, and don't understand what it is or its interplay between their other values, and often make choices where they deprioritize privacy against other values, and this is reflected in their behavior and usage of the site, which Zuck is keenly aware of as a product and user-oriented CEO.

My observation of Facebook as a company (its people, including its executives) is that it cares a lot about privacy. It spends a lot of time thinking about it, it spends a lot of time thinking about how to protect its users' privacy, and then (ironically) it is continually surprised at how the vast majority of its users don't end up really caring at all to make use of various privacy-protection mechanisms built into the products. There are public flare-ups, but these are subject to a selection bias, in that there aren't flare-ups when people don't have a privacy issue (i.e. it is more a symptom of how often Facebook deals with privacy issues rather than how well/poorly it does). Instead, the company is often in a position of balancing user desires for a less-private product with its own feelings that user privacy needs to be protected more.

Consider: a product exists which can allow you, a user, to invade the privacy [to some degree, along a fairly muddy continuum] of other users. These users include your friends, family, and certain strangers. In return, it allows other people to invade your privacy in the same way, but you often don't know when they are doing it. I use the word "invade" here not to mean "cross some system-designed boundary," but in the muddier sense of "seeing some information I've technically made accessible but didn't think too much about and therefore would feel a little uncomfortable if certain people saw it." This is the root of most privacy "issues."

The problem is that the vast majority of users spend their time using Facebook to, essentially, invade the privacy of those around them (and of strangers they find interesting), and generally request feature modifications to enhance their ability to do so. They want profiles of strangers to be more public (so they can e.g. tell if someone is a former classmate), they want apps to be able to pull information about their friends (because the app is supposedly part of Facebook, so why can't it do so?), they want to see this and that which their friends want to hide from them. Almost no one says "I want my information to be more hidden by default and I would find the product more useful to me if it was so for everyone else."

The essential problem with privacy as a right is that it is not understood by most people in the way that other rights are. Most people understand that, e.g. the right to property is a reciprocal right: you want your property rights respected, and in turn you are willing to not steal things from others. This is not so with privacy. Plenty of people read with gushing delight the lurid details and gossip of celebrities or other semi-private individuals (like high-profile crime cases) - and demand a "right" to do so - when they would not be comfortable exposing such details about their own lives. How many of you, despite Tiger Woods specifically stating the the details of his affairs should be a private matter, nevertheless read the news reports about him and, in some cases, even looked up more information? Did you realize you were callously violating his privacy, providing the demand for tabloid articles? That's exactly the demand that users place on Facebook every day, wanting to invade the privacy of their friends, family, and acquaintance-strangers.

Mark Zuckerberg, having helmed the company from its earliest days, is pretty familiar and realistic about this being the zeitgeist of the userbase, as are many long-time employees, and he and many long-time employees are able to think about privacy in this way - i.e. both about privacy and about how people really think and act about privacy. Most of the company (owing to fast growth, the majority of the employee base at any one time has been there for less than 2 years) holds the realization of these user desires in a sort of mild horror and reluctance.

Therefore, my interpretation of the reality behind that quote (unsourced) is that Mark Zuckerberg probably cares about privacy, but he probably also understands it in a far deeper way than most people do, because he has to work with it in a real and practical sense, and so if he "doesn't believe in it," it's in the way that someone doesn't "believe in" a primitive and unexamined view of something when he has had to personally develop a fuller and deeper understanding of it.


Again:

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

----

[1] One of the most naive and oft-repeated interpretations of every action Facebook takes is that it is being done out of an desire to maximize profits. These are often incorrect. A close study of Facebook's actions over its history will indicate that the company - and in particular Mark Zuckerberg - have deliberately and repeatedly made decisions that defer or even reduce revenue potential in pursuit of other goals.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg always wear the same shirt?

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Sai

IT Analyst at Dell International (2016–present)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had his first-ever public Q&A session on Thursday.

He answered a lot of questions, but the one that got a lot of interest was, “Why do you wear the same T-shirt every day?”

For those who haven’t noticed, Zuckerberg wears the same gray T-shirt at most public events. While many expected a playful response, Zuckerberg gave a pretty serious answer for his penchant to wear the same gray shirt.

"I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community," Zuckerberg said, after clarifying that he had "multiple same shirts."

He said even small decisions like choosing what to wear or what to eat for breakfast could be tiring and consume energy, and he didn't want to waste any time on that.

"I'm in this really lucky position, where I get to wake up every day and help serve more than a billion people. And I feel like I'm not doing my job if I spend any of my energy on things that are silly or frivolous about my life," he said.

Zuckerberg pointed out that numerous other influential people, like Apple founder Steve Jobs or President Barack Obama, have the same theory with regards to choosing their outfits. Jobs, in fact, told biographer Walter Isaacson that he even wanted to have all Apple employees wear the same vest.3.6K viewsView 2 upvotes2

How do I contact Mark Zuckerberg via postal mail?

João Paulino

Lived in Angola (2017–2017)

Hi, Mark Zuckerberg. I am African and I live in Angola. I am experiencing great economic difficulties in relation to the financing of my studies (higher education) after the death of my brother I no longer have where to turn. I ask the world that I have the opportunity to study, but it is difficult to find someone so charitable about it. Please help me

My email: joaopaulino07@hotmail.com1.2K viewsView 3 upvotes3

What are the things Adam D'Angelo taught Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ravi Mishra

Just another engineerMark Zuckerberg said that he learned a lot from Adam D'Angelo. This is the original blog post by Aaron Greenspan. Writing :: The Lost Chapter and this is the article on business insider. In Alleged New IMs, Mark Zuckerberg Says There Are Only '6 People In The World With Good Ideas'(more)

Why doesn't Mark Zuckerberg date supermodels?

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Will Chou

Lived in Washington, DC

Mark is a nerd. And people have different interests and tastes.

He gets more enjoyment from programming and building a business than he does from traveling the world, living on yachts, playing with dolls, creating music, or dating models.

It’s shocking to believe and I get you because I used to find it hard that other people didn’t share my interests and passions too. How come someone not see the beauty in star wars or how awesome a girl’s butt is?

But the truth is that people can have widely different views and values, though most people share similarities (think the standard bell curve).

Mark was obsessed with building and growing Facebook and that’s what he did.

He had a girl that was smart, going to be a doctor, loyal, honest, and hard working. Likely, he valued these traits, as you should, because they indicate a strong partner and (also coincidentally a strong employee to hire).

There are more and different things to value than just the superficial. Believe me, it’s hard for me to fathom too even though I understand it on a logical level because my genetics spur me to dramatically overemphasize the physical.

A lot of people imagine the supermodel to have a glamorous life and nothing but fantastic qualities: jet-setting around the world, rich, famous, beautiful, successful, ambitious, hard working … right?

But I’ve followed some of these girls on youtube via their vlogs and other social media and there lives aren’t ideal for a relationship. Because of work, they’re always traveling and never in the same city for long, which makes maintaining a relationship hard because it’s long distance.

Also, they’re constantly bombarded with different people they’re meeting, photoshoots, temptations, and parties.

While there is definitely hard work involved, luck plays more of a role in this field. The industry is built on reaching your peak earning potential while still very young (20 when most people live until their 80’s) so it is a breeding ground for people to get arrogant and large egos about their ability when a lot of it was due to their genetic luck around their beauty and dimensions.

It’s super easy and tempting to overemphasize the beauty of a woman over everything else, I fall for it too and it’s the natural thing for most men to do. Other CEO’s, like the CEO of Snapchat and Elon Musk, and band leaders, like Adam Levine, are dating or married to Victoria’s Secret models likely for this reason.

These models are typically seen by society as what society chooses as the “most beautiful women on earth” (whether or not that is true is debatable but you get the point). And many men fall for this as a measuring stick for their ego by showing off that they can get these highly desirable women at the top of the ego, often forsaking other qualities or overlooking other traits (empathy, emotional intelligence, hustle, ambition, caring, etc.) for this title.

And maybe that’s why Elon’s two times divorced. But maybe not.6.2K viewsView 21 upvotes21

How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg?

Anonymous

: How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg? Its an emergency situation

Oh my goodness, that is so cute on multiple levels.

  1. You think 'inspiring' a group of college students is an emergency
  2. You think it is such an emergency that you could compel a billionaire to fly to New York or otherwise participate in some fashion

I'm shocked. Are people in this world really so naive? What could possibly make you think you could get any help to inspire a group of apathetic millennials?

How good of a programmer is Mark Zuckerberg and does he still sometimes code for Facebook?

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Dakini Alexandra Isenegger·

CEO @Linkilaw | Forbes 30 Under 30 | Top Writer 2017 & 2018In 2006, Zuckerberg gave up coding to focus on running the business of Facebook. When visiting Nigeria in August 2016, he admitted publicly that giving up coding to manage his company was "a little sad"."There is an elegance to writing code that I miss," Zuckerberg said during a Q&A session with tech entrepreneurs and developers in Lagos, Nigeria. "The code always does what you want - and people don't." Even though he has expressed love for programming, Zuckerberg majored in psychology, not computer science. His peers don’t place him in the uppermost tier of skilled coders. On TopCoder, a site where coders improve and rank their skills, he's only in the third level. Adam D'Angelo — the former CTO of Facebook and founder of Quora — is in the top level, "red."

What was it like to go to Harvard with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Aamer Tahseen·

Back on this site...for nowMy dad used to go with him for a temporary study computer science so he told me the story of the Facebook experience from his point of view. At the time Zuckerberg was a prodigy, and he always won the attention of the teachers, every time my dad used to raise his hand during lectures, the professor would still ignore him, even though Zuckerberg wasn't even listening in class he would be picked. As the year passed by, and Zuckerberg was slowly coming into the development of "Facebook", my father always noticed his wide interests in social communications, at the time, for undergraduates there would be something called a "face book", a collage for names and pictures of students, my dad didn't even care because, but he did notice that Zuckerberg was always fascinated by that and he always sp(more)

Why is Mark Zuckerberg's Twitter user name finkd?

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Samuel E. Koranteng

There's a silver lining to all this global chaos, and Mark believes that. After Mark stopped visiting New York when his cousin was robbed by amateur droids, he ventured down a new path of telekinetic travel. It was on one of these trips that he met Finkelton! -an unusually tiny species of alien who advised him to acquire a billion dollars in 3 month. Thus Facebook was born. That Twitter name is a memorial to one of Mark's best advisers from outer space, who was incinerated three months ago. Disclaimer: Mark mentioned here is Mark Jupalopa of Senegal, and the writer reserves the right to humorous answers!(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

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Adam Rifkin·Updated May 19, 2012Better to be a Founder than a Loser.Originally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing?

The valuation jumps from round to round were orders of magnitude until Facebook hit a $15 billion valuation, resulting in tiny dilutions accompanying each financing.

Note also that with every financing, the Silicon Valley echo chamber thought the investors were nuts to offer such rich valuations. It's now clear the echo chamber was wrong every time; the investors were quite savvy, as a matter of fact.

I don't know exact numbers, but I believe Facebook's equity sales to investors were roughly:

Sep 04 -- 10% sold for $500k. ($5mm valuation -- Peter Thiel, Angels)

May 05 -- 12.7% sold for $12.7mm. ($100mm valuation -- Accel)

Apr 06 -- 5% sold for $27.5mm. ($550mm valuation -- Greylock, Meritech, Founders Fund)

Oct 07 -- 1.6% sold for $240mm. ($15b valuation -- Microsoft)

Nov 07 thru Apr 08 -- 0.9% sold for $135mm ($15b valuation -- Li Ka-shing and European Founders Fund)

May 08 -- no dilution; took $100mm in venture debt from Triple Point Capital

May 09 -- 1.3% sold for $200mm. ($15b valuation -- Digital Sky Technologies)

Jun 10 -- 0.8% sold for $120mm (a blended $14b valuation -- Elevation)

Jan 11 -- 3% sold for $1.5b ($50b valuation -- thank you Goldman Sachs!)

Feb 11 -- 0.1% sold for $38mm ($52b valuation -- really, KPCB?!)


Alexia Tsotsis did an incredible job representing these financing rounds as a fantastic infographic: TechCrunch.com/2011/01/10/facebook-5/

The Next Web and Scobleizer have an excellent graphic of who owns Facebook as of 1/11/11, accounting for dilutions: TheNextWeb.com/facebook/2011/01/12/so-who-really-owns-facebook-chart/

The reasons for drastic up rounds of valuation each time were:

1) The unprecedented momentum of product's core metrics (users and usage).

2) The excellent advice and guidance from the beginning, first from Stephen Venuto and Sean Parker, then Peter Thiel and Reid Garrett Hoffman, then Matt Cohler and Jim Breyer, and at some point Marc Andreessen.

3) Enough revenues (mostly ads) to never have to raise a round with unfriendly terms. See Carlos Tobin's answer to How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

The unusual combination of tremendous product momentum and the right people involved created the ideal conditions for such tiny dilution.


One other factor: Zuck never had an equal co-founder like Larry and Sergey. Were that the case, both Zuck and co-Zuck would each own 13%, rendering them roughly the same as pre-IPO Google.

See also: What were the 4 or 5 key decisions that Mark Zuckerberg made in the early days of Facebook?

Is Mark Zuckerberg difficult to work with?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)No. There are plenty of people who are happy to work with him, though there are also plenty who find it difficult. He is not some sort of ideally charismatic person whose primary quality is that he's easy to get along with. Rather, he's a demanding CEO with a monomaniacal focus on making Facebook succeed in its mission. This is not to say that he's mean - he's a perfectly nice guy on a personal level; it's just that professionally, he is focused on getting it done, and has a limited tolerance for emotional fragility in the people he needs to help him execute on that mission. In my study of business leaders, I've yet to come across one who was considered "great" who didn't also have a significant body count of ex-employees claiming that they were autocratic and mean. Examples include Jac(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a good human being?

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Personally, I don't think he's that great. I always think of random ideas and wonder "hmm should I mock something up and try to implement it?", but I never do cause I'm complacent with my daily routines. Couple years back I got really sick and took a leave from work, which left me with some availability in my day (when not complaining about my aching body). I was trying to complete something on Facebook and was having some difficulties sorting out the privacy permission settings and thought for something that was designed to be user friendly, it really isn't that friendly. Well, I had time to mock something up to potentially make Facebook user friendly. With over 30 hours of brainstorming and trying to convince my dog that his walk would be in 10 minutes, I had a eureka moment.

Does Mark Zuckerberg have mild Asperger's?

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Blandine Mifsud·

17 years in a relationship with a self-harming partnerOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic?

NOTE: The original question was:”Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic” My answer was to that exact question and not to the merge and different: Is Mark Zuckerberg psychopathic”

Kahn compares psychopathy to autism, not because the two disorders are similar in their manifestation, but because they're both neurological disorders. There is an overlap between the symptoms of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders. Those two disorders require differential diagnosis:

[Differential diagnosis of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders in adults. Empathic deficit as a core symptom].


Hi Gabriela, I do not know for sure as I have not investigated him.

NOTE: It would take me more than one week to asses him (or anyone). I don’t even do proper assessment. I simply investigate genetics with dysmorphology. Focusing only on some specific personalities: the ones that I consider to be of specific interest regarding my current investigation. At the present time, Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t fit my criteria / doesn’t interest me. I‘ll certainly not investigate him unless Mark himself will contact me for that purpose. Secondly, considering that I’m an amateur detective and not a professional geneticist, obviously he will never made such request.

What I can say from few seconds checking pictures from Google is that Mark Zuckerberg seems to have few dysmorphic facial features.

He seems to have an asymmetric face. Asymmetric face indicates a problem on the midline, a rather symptomatic occurrence in male autistic patients. Patient with this cranial anomaly tend to have some others anomalies. Mark has an extremely mild orbital hypotelorism (an abnormally decreased distance between the eyes).

Autistic people have more anomalies related to their ears : Size, rotation, location….

Mark’s ears doesn’t seem to be on the same level: it could be a sign of sensory disorder, a condition comorbid in autism. Sensory disorder exists without autism.

Clinical research: Facial features can help diagnose autism | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Autistic people collect routines: routines in speech, routine in behaviors, routine in postures… Mark Z have limited facial expression, limited postures. I could not help to notice the way he holds his hands seems very repetitive. It’s difficult not to notice that he is not a fashion addict neither: his wardrobe is basically a grey tee shirt + jean or a dark costume with a white shirt..and a tie (of changing colors in hue ranging from grey to blue).

Autism is a spectrum. A wide spectrum. Most of those on the spectrum have special interest in which they will become real experts. It’s hard to deny Mark Zuckerberg is above fluent in computer. You need a special brain to master that technologie the way he masters it…

At the present time dysmorphology is not used as a diagnostic tool for autism. Before Mark could qualify as autistic he will have to fill each an every of the six Gillberg’s criteria for confirmation of diagnosis.

GILLBERG'S CRITERIA FOR ASPERGER'S DISORDER (SYNDROME)

  1. Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction
    (at least two of the following)
    (a) inability to interact with peers
    (b) lack of desire to interact with peers
    (c) lack of appreciation of social cues
    (d) socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior

2. All-absorbing narrow interest
(at least one of the following)
(a) exclusion of other activities
(b) repetitive adherence
(c) more rote than meaning

3. Imposition of routines and interests
(at least one of the following)
(a) on self, in aspects of life
(b) on others

4. Speech and language problems
(at least three of the following)
(a) delayed development
(b) superficially perfect expressive language
(c) formal, pedantic language
(d) odd prosody, peculiar voice characteristics
(e) impairment of comprehension including misinterpretations of literal/implied meanings

5. Non-verbal communication problems
(at least one of the following)
(a) limited use of gestures
(b) clumsy/gauche body language
(c) limited facial expression
(d) inappropriate expression
(e) peculiar, stiff gaze

6.Motor clumsiness: poor performance on neurodevelopmental examination

Considering that Mark did take a parternity leave following the birth of his daughter, he doesn’t seems to have inability to interact with peers or lack of desire to interact with peers. In order to qualify as autistic Marck will have to fill the criteria of Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction with either the lack of appreciation of social cues and to behave socially and emotionally inappropriate.

How good is Mark Zuckerberg's Chinese?

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Glenn Luk

Expert in the ABC dialectOn a scale from Chris Tucker to Dashan, his accent is somewhere between John Cena and Jon Huntsman. Here is Mark speaking at Tsinghua University in October 2014: A year later, he gave another speech in Mandarin (Facebook Video) and he had clearly improved. And then for Chinese New Year 2016, he and his wife Priscilla uploaded a video: You can tell that his Chinese is getting better over time. Honestly, in the New Year’s video it’s probably on the same level as his (Chinese-American) wife. If he has been keeping it up, it should be even better by now! P.S. I really have a lot of respect for Mark for putting himself out there and speaking Chinese in public even though it is not his native language. 加油 Mark! P.P.S. Accent can be

How academically smart is Mark Zuckerberg? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

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Robert Scoble

Former Chief Strategy Officer at Infinite Retina (2019–2020)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg, academic-wise? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

I've spent time with both several times. I find Bill Gates is just an amazing intellect, and I don't think it's fair to compare ANYONE to him. Zuckerberg is also an amazing intellect, but it's different and we haven't had as many opportunities to study him the way we have had with Gates.

Bill Gates has a photographic memory. One time he said something on stage word-for-word that I had told him six months prior. Many people I know have these experiences with Bill. Every time I meet him I mostly listen. My intellect isn't even close to his. Zuckerberg, though, for some reason, feels a bit more approachable, but I attribute that to his age and the fact that he's building something I understand a bit more than I understood the internals of Windows.

Zuckerberg, too, is damn smart and in recent conversations with him I've come away thinking "he just is doing better thinking on social software than anyone else." Plus, in addition to his other academic qualifications, he studied Chinese for his recent trip. I was only able to learn a few words. I'm sure he did a lot better! :-) I don't remember Gates learning other languages (update: Gary Stein says that he and his wife are learning Chinese), although I'm sure he'd count basic and C++ as other languages.

On the other hand, Zuckerberg seems more comfortable in social settings, walking me right up to Jet Li and introducing us at a Time party. I met Gates at one party in the mid-90s and just had a tough time getting him to talk until we started talking about just-in-time compilers and then he went on for half an hour. At last year's TED in the hallways Bill did the same thing, but instead of talking compilers was talking about nuclear power.

Zuckerberg has impressed me similarly, but is still focused on building Facebook so isn't spending much time thinking about other things. Clearly, as the questioner showed, Zuckerberg is a smart dude too and picks things up VERY fast. I witnessed this when Zuckerberg met other CEOs and discussed the technologies they were using to build their companies.

So, to answer the question: Gates wins, but mostly because we've seen how he learns new topics for a longer time.

What would be interesting is to put the 26-year-old Gates next to the 26-year-old Zuckerberg and compare them. If we did that then Zuckerberg probably would win.1.3M viewsView 15,523 upvotesView shares15.5K29196

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What has Adam D'Angelo learned from Mark Zuckerberg?

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Chirag Shah

Former Software Developer at Barclays Investment Bank (company) (2018–2019)

I am not the right person to answer this, but I would like to have my say.

Adam D'Angelo - the former CTO of Facebook was a pure geek guy with amazing coding abilities in his early days, we can see this from his topcoder profile. dangelo Profile | TopCoder He was at top level, “red”.

On the other hand Zuckerberg's profile on the site is at the "green" level which isn’t as good as the one Angelo has. mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder

Having said that, Zuckerberg knew how to build projects, he knew how systems were built, how to bring the ideas into reality and how to indulge people by using the notion of ‘connectivity’.

This can be concluded from that fact that he developed a ‘course selection program’ and ‘facemash’ in his sophomore year at Harvard.

During a CS50 course, Mark had delivered a guest lecture regarding how he expanded and scaled facebook to a global level.

Here is his talk:

Mark was very confident in whatever he did, he had a sense of control in what he built. He had a clear vision and he always wanted to build his product for the people, he wanted people to be connected to each other.

These were the qualities which could have been observed by Adam.

Apart from his coding prowess, Adam could have learned how to build a company, how to scale the products and monetize them.

Also given the fact that whole idea of Mark was to connect people, Adam could have been inspired by this very whole idea of ‘how to connect people’ and hence he built this amazing ‘Quora’ where people were more connected by their questions and ideas, where they could share their views and opinions.

This is just my take on this subject. What Adam has learned can be answered by no one other than him.

Why is Mark Zuckerberg so hated?

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Quy Tan

Knows VietnameseI think because of the following reasons: 1. He is a Jew. If you visit White Supremacist forums (I visit these harmful websites sometimes, just because of curiosity), they hate Jew and Israel deeply, and especially they hate the most famous, richest, most successful and most powerful Jew like Mark Zuckerberg. Oh don't worry, they hate everything. They hate Black, Chinese, and White Liberal as well. 2. He is accused of anti-conservative bias. He also got hated by Trump supporters. For example, he often fact-checks or even delete wrong claim or disinformation regarding Coronavirus by Trump or some Trump supporters. 3. Rumors and fake news: It is so ridiculous that New Tang Dynasty Vietnam claim that Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg are a “slave” of China, and work for China favor. While in China, people cl(more)

What are some interesting facts about Mark Zuckerberg?

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Bhanu Prasad

UI Developer at Virtusa (company)Here are a few facts about the facebook legend... 1) All Blue Facebook CEO is red-green colour blind, which means that the best colour he can see is blue. Zuckerberg reportedly once said, "Blue is the richest colour for me. I can see all of blue." No prizes for guessing why blue is the most dominant colour on the world's top social networking site. 2) Declined job offers from Microsoft, AOL While in high school, Zuckerberg co-developed a music app called Synapse Media Player. Tech giants Microsoft and AOL reportedly offered Zuckerberg a million dollars to further develop the app as well as wanted to hire him. Zuckerberg instead chose to join Harvard University. 3) Doesn't own a TV, calls himself atheist Born to Jewish parents, Zuckerberg considers himself an atheist. According to a report in Busi(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg become a programming prodigy?

David Roth

Former Digital SE at Amazon (company) (2011–2013)Originally Answered: how did Mark Zuckerberg train himself to be a programming prodigy?

This is a very interesting question to me because, as several responders have pointed out already, it's based on a flawed premise. Mark Zuckerberg is not the person that most coders would think of when they hear the term "programming prodigy".

I think the questioner equates fame, wealth, or success with being a prodigy. This is almost never the case in coding. Coders who are good will generally make a good living but they do not, as a rule, become CEOs.

When I think of a programming prodigy, the first person who comes to mind is Paul Allen, because of the anecdote about writing the loader for Microsoft Basic for the Altair computer while flying to Albuquerque. Note that this was in 1975; there weren't laptops that you could take on a plane then. Allen was writing machine code on a piece of paper with a pencil, and he created a loader program that worked. That's pretty amazing. Altair BASIC

Another prodigy would be Margaret Hamilton. She wrote the code for the Apollo space program. The sheer scope of that project and the hardware limitations she was dealing with are staggering. She had finished this code by the time she was 31. Margaret Hamilton (scientist)

As for the "how did x train themselves to become a prodigy" part of the question, you don't really train to become a prodigy. A prodigy is someone who is exceptionally good at what they do; there is an implication in term that the person is naturally gifted. A prodigy has a natural interest in their chosen art and they're good at it, so they enjoy practicing it and studying it. "Training to become a prodigy" is kind of like "training to become lucky"; it's a nonsensical proposition.60K viewsView 337 upvotesView shares33726

How self-disciplined is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Arjun Singh

Content Creator at BackNo (2018–present)Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg is very sensitive Entrepreneur in the world. I have noticed many things when I read the blog, books and watched videos. so all I want to share on Quora platform. * Only Only Eats What I Kills: * * Zuckerberg's view on nutrition ethics is similar to some types of Buddhist vegetarianism and Locavorism. And as he himself admitted, it's "basically" a vegetarian diet. However, the fact that Zuckerberg did kill some animals himself — according to Fortune, this includes a lobster, chicken, pig and a goat — to eat them will surely stir some controversy. Zuckerberg even posted a message on his private Facebook page on May 4 saying, "I just killed a pig and a goat." * Set annual goals: * * Despite his claim of laser-focus, Zuckerberg has always had interests beyond social media. B(more)

How does Mark Zuckerberg manage his time?

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Pascal Lorig

Lives in GermanyThe key is outsourcing. No matter if Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, all of them have personal assistants and a crew around them. Their business basically is running itself. Their job is showing the course. That is why they do meetings all the time. Private time does not require much management, because there is very little. Steve Jobs for instance took his spare time for having dinner with the whole family. Once a year he made time for holidays. Mark Zuckerberg himself said that you get what you spend the most time on. So he eliminates all distractions. For instance his clothing is always the same. He is also known for sleeping less than usual people. So that gives him extra time. People like Mark Zuckerberg also have to prioritise.

How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email? How many hundreds or thousands of emails do they receive daily, and how do they manage them? Do they have an assistant that filters all the important stuff?

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Tim Williams

Originally Answered: How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email?

It's all about the content of the email that determines how it would be handled.

They are humans, they get notifications of new mail, and assuming they're near their device, they will see it firsthand like the rest of us.

Here are some possibilities for handling:

  • Direct communication with other leaders of the company, employees, relevant partner companies, important service providers, and of course financial/banking matters. I'd also assume even government and other national and international matters.
  • Basic filters for newsletters, list emails from companies/competitors they're interested in, and other subject matters they follow.
  • Pre-written personal responses for some frequent inquiries: Can you attend my conference, talk to me on the phone about my project, mentor me, or some other general ask that... if they weren't so highly desired, they would be likely to want to listen to you. These are replies they can copy/paste from drafts, Evernote, or whatever tool of choice.
  • Forward to the appropriate person. Often times, emails are sent to these figures misguidedly. There are plenty of people who work for them who are far more suited to reply, so for a basic example, a legitimate email for some real business development opportunity - would be forwarded without a personal response to the appropriate person.
  • Personal Assistant(s). For things like scheduling meetings, phone calls, events, and other things that said recipient wants to actually take part in, they are unlikely to coordinate the logistics personally. This is where they may confirm something by email and then pass off to a PA to handle the details. A PA may also convert verbal responses into email responses for convenience and speed.
  • Multiple email addresses. I am less sure of this one, but I'd guess that they have an email address that's easy enough to guess that they do monitor (first.last@whatever.com) that follows the above protocol that receives a bulk of it. Then, they probably have a secondary company email that is strictly private or even perhaps limited to company and authorized sender list only for what I'll call "daily biz". And of course lastly, one or more personal email addresses to communicate with family and others.

In summary, it's all about what the content of the email is and that will determine any number of filters as to how it's handled.

What are some of Mark Zuckerberg's mistakes at Facebook?

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Eric Benjamin Seufert

Author of Freemium Economics, Owner of Mobile Dev MemoFacebook waited too long to transition to mobile (Facebook only launched its native iOS app in August 2012! Facebook Launches Native App for iPhone and iPad, Rebuilt From Ground Up) and as a result wasn't able to capture the mobile advertising market in near entirety, which it almost certainly would have had it focused on mobile (and, subsequently, mobile advertising) sooner. Had Facebook acted faster, it probably could have preempted the creation of the affiliate / syndication networks that proliferated on mobile beginning in around 2012 and added tens of billions of dollars to its enterprise value at exactly the point when many public investors became skittish about its future prospects (Facebook Stock Sinks Below $30 -- How Much Farther Will it Drop?). That said, Facebook's transition t(more)

Should Mark Zuckerberg slowly phase advertising out of Facebook's ecosystem?

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Mark Rogowsky

Forbes technology, raconteur, @maxrogoBy all means. I mean, it's currently only about 90% of Facebook's revenue. And that revenue is only going to be about $5 billion this year. And it was zero just a few years ago. So, I mean clearly this whole advertising thing isn't working out for Facebook. Also, the company only has something like a billion users and only half of them log on daily. And when it rolled out its newest ad product, Sponsored Stories, it only found that was worth about $1 million per day. To make matters worse, only half that revenue was coming from mobile -- and lots of people use Facebook on mobile. Finally, it's crystal clear that for Facebook to exploit new monetization schemes it has to stop making money from advertising because clearly those are mutually exclusive. There is obviously no way to begin chargi(more)

Between Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, who is more selfish? Why?

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Sean Chou

Business Intelligence Consultant & small business owner;ENTJUndoubtedly Mark Zuckerberg is more selfish. Zuckerberg’s professional motto has always been “connecting the world” through Facebook, which any self-respecting person can see serves his own purposes. Facebook now touts half or nearly half the world's population as users, and it continues to grow. Not so long ago, Zuckerberg wished to be the face of modern colonialism by “gifting” large portions of India with free wifi internet access, albeit tethered permanently to his own Facebook platform. India refused it unsurprisingly, and Zuckerberg jested that India didn't want to “step into the future.” Nevertheless, he did not pursue giving India free internet without also shoving Facebook down their throats. Another case in point: Zuckerberg has pledged with so many other billionaires to give away(more)

How can I get in touch with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Joe Tannorella

Founder at UIDB.io (2016–present)When I wanted to contact an equally famous person - Sir Richard Branson - I made this: Dear Sir Richard Branson It took 2 weeks of pure hustle, including: * Calling all of his company receptions (Virgin Group reception were especially receptive) * Asking everyone in my network * Trying to reach his family members and their respective companies: son, daughter * Messaging all of his company CEOs via email and LinkedIn Premium * Commenting on his social media posts * Facebook advertising. Targeted him, his family, and more * Calling the BBC when I found out that SRB was live on their show that evening * Twitter advertising * …A hell of a lot more… You have to really want it. And you have to give him a reason to want to read what you’re telling him. Good luck!(more)

Who is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Mayank Sharma

HR at Teleperformance Indore (2019–present)Originally Answered:

Who is Mark Zukerburg?

Mark Zuckerberg ( Chief Executive Officer of Facebook )

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is an American technology entrepreneur and philanthropist. Zuckerberg is known for co-founding and leading Facebook as its chairman and chief executive officer. He also co-founded and is a board member of the solar sail spacecraft development project Breakthrough Starshot

Who Is Mark Zuckerberg?

Born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, Mark Zuckerberg co-founded the social-networking website Facebook out of his college dorm room.

He left Harvard after his sophomore year to concentrate on the site, the user base of which has grown to more than 2 billion people, making Zuckerberg a billionaire many times over. The birth of Facebook was portrayed in the 2010 film The Social Network.

Early Life

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg was born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, into a comfortable, well-educated family, and raised in the nearby village of Dobbs Ferry.

His father, Edward Zuckerberg, ran a dental practice attached to the family's home. His mother, Karen, worked as a psychiatrist before the birth of the couple's four children—Mark, Randi, Donna and Arielle.

Zuckerberg developed an interest in computers at an early age; when he was about 12, he used Atari BASIC to create a messaging program he named "Zucknet." His father used the program in his dental office, so that the receptionist could inform him of a new patient without yelling across the room. The family also used Zucknet to communicate within the house.

Together with his friends, he also created computer games just for fun. "I had a bunch of friends who were artists," he said. "They'd come over, draw stuff, and I'd build a game out of it."

Education

To keep up with Mark's burgeoning interest in computers, his parents hired private computer tutor David Newman to come to the house once a week and work with Mark. Newman later told reporters that it was hard to stay ahead of the prodigy, who began taking graduate courses at nearby Mercy College around this same time.

Zuckerberg later studied at Phillips Exeter Academy, an exclusive preparatory school in New Hampshire. There he showed talent in fencing, becoming the captain of the school's team. He also excelled in literature, earning a diploma in classics.

Yet Zuckerberg remained fascinated by computers, and continued to work on developing new programs. While still in high school, he created an early version of the music software Pandora, which he called Synapse.

Several companies—including AOL and Microsoft—expressed an interest in buying the software, and hiring the teenager before graduation. He declined the offers.

Zuckerberg at Harvard

After graduating from Exeter in 2002, Zuckerberg enrolled at Harvard University. By his sophomore year at the Ivy League institution, he had developed a reputation as the go-to software developer on campus. It was at that time that he built a program called CourseMatch, which helped students choose their classes based on the course selections of other users.

He also invented Facemash, which compared the pictures of two students on campus and allowed users to vote on which one was more attractive. The program became wildly popular, but was later shut down by the school administration after it was deemed inappropriate.

Based on the buzz of his previous projects, three of his fellow students—Divya Narendra, and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss—sought him out to work on an idea for a social networking site they called Harvard Connection. This site was designed to use information from Harvard's student networks in order to create a dating site for the Harvard elite.

Zuckerberg agreed to help with the project, but soon dropped out to work on his own social networking site with friends Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes and Eduardo Saverin.

Zuckerberg and his friends created a site that allowed users to create their own profiles, upload photos, and communicate with other users. The group ran the site—first called The Facebook—out of a dorm room at Harvard until June 2004.

After his sophomore year, Zuckerberg dropped out of college to devote himself to Facebook full time, moving the company to Palo Alto, California. By the end of 2004, Facebook had 1 million users.

Facebook Rises

In 2005, Zuckerberg's enterprise received a huge boost from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. Accel invested $12.7 million into the network, which at the time was open only to Ivy League students.

Zuckerberg's company then granted access to other colleges, high school and international schools, pushing the site's membership to more than 5.5 million users by December 2005. The site then began attracting the interest of other companies, who wanted to advertise with the popular social hub.

Not wanting to sell out, Zuckerberg turned down offers from companies such as Yahoo! and MTV Networks. Instead, he focused on expanding the site, opening up his project to outside developers and adding more features.

Legal Hurdles

Zuckerberg seemed to be going nowhere but up. However, in 2006, the business mogul faced his first big hurdle: the creators of Harvard Connection claimed that Zuckerberg stole their idea, and insisted the software developer needed to pay for their business losses.

Zuckerberg maintained that the ideas were based on two very different types of social networks but, after lawyers searched Zuckerberg's records, incriminating instant messages revealed that Zuckerberg may have intentionally stolen the intellectual property of Harvard Connection and offered Facebook users' private information to his friends.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the incriminating messages, saying he regretted them. "If you're going to go on to build a service that is influential and that a lot of people rely on, then you need to be mature, right?" he said in an interview with The New Yorker. "I think I've grown and learned a lot."

Although an initial settlement of $65 million was reached between the two parties, the legal dispute over the matter continued well into 2011, after Narendra and the Winklevosses claimed they were misled in regards to the value of their stock.

'The Social Network'

Zuckerberg faced yet another personal challenge when the 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, by writer Ben Mezrich, hit stores. Mezrich was heavily criticized for his re-telling of Zuckerberg's story, which used invented scenes, re-imagined dialogue and fictional characters.

Regardless of how true-to-life the story was, Mezrich managed to sell the rights of the tale to screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the critically acclaimed film The Social Network received eight Academy Award nominations.

Zuckerberg objected strongly to the film's narrative, and later told a reporter at The New Yorker that many of the details in the film were inaccurate. For example, Zuckerberg had been dating longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan, a Chinese-American medical student he met at Harvard, since 2003. He also said he never had interest in joining any of the final clubs.

"It's interesting what stuff they focused on getting right; like, every single shirt and fleece that I had in that movie is actually a shirt or fleece that I own," Zuckerberg told a reporter at a startup conference in 2010. "So there's all this stuff that they got wrong and a bunch of random details that they got right."

Yet Zuckerberg and Facebook continued to succeed, in spite of the criticism. Time magazine named him Person of the Year in 2010, and Vanity Fair placed him at the top of their New Establishment list.

Net Worth

Forbes ranked Zuckerberg at No. 35—beating out Apple CEO Steve Jobs—on its "400" list, estimating his net worth to be $6.9 billion at the time.

Philanthropic Causes

Since amassing his sizeable fortune, Zuckerberg has used his millions to fund a variety of philanthropic causes. The most notable examples came in 2010: In September of that year, he donated $100 million to save the failing Newark Public Schools system in New Jersey.

Then, in December 2010, Zuckerberg signed the "Giving Pledge", promising to donate at least 50 percent of his wealth to charity over the course of his lifetime. Other Giving Pledge members include Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and George Lucas. After his donation, Zuckerberg called on other young, wealthy entrepreneurs to follow suit.

"With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts," he said.

Facebook IPO

Zuckerberg made two major life changes in May 2012: Facebook had its initial public offering, which raised $16 billion, making it the biggest Internet IPO in history.

After the initial success of the IPO, the Facebook stock price dropped somewhat in the early days of trading, though Zuckerberg is expected to weather any ups and downs in his company's market performance.

Wife

Also in May 2012—one day after the IPO—Zuckerberg wed his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan. About 100 people gathered at the couple's Palo Alto, California home.

The guests thought they were there to celebrate Chan's graduation from medical school, but instead they witnessed Zuckerberg and Chan exchange vows.

One year later, Facebook made the Fortune 500 list for the first time—making Zuckerberg, at the age of 28, the youngest CEO on the list.

Daughter

In November 2015, Zuckerberg and Chan welcomed a daughter, Max, and Zuckerberg announced he would be taking two months of paternity leave to spend with his family. He and his wife also pledged in an open letter to their daughter that they would give 99 percent of their Facebook shares to charity.

"We are committed to doing our small part to help create this world for all children," the couple wrote in the open letter that was posted on Zuckerberg's Facebook page. "We will give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives to join many others in improving this world for the next generation."

In September 2016, Zuckerberg and Chan announced that the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), the company into which they put their Facebook shares, would invest at least $3 billion into scientific research over the next decade to help “cure, prevent and manage all diseases in our children's lifetime." Renowned neuroscientist Cori Bargmann of The Rockefeller University, was named the president of science at CZI.

They also announced the founding of Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a San Francisco-based independent research center that will bring together engineers, computer scientists, biologists, chemists and others in the scientific community. A partnership between Stanford University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley, Biohub will receive initial funding of $600 million over 10 years.

In March 2017, Zuckerberg and Chan announced on Facebook that they were expecting their second child. Daughter August was born on August 28.

The CEO has undertaken a personal challenge at the start of every year since 2009, with previous efforts including learning to speak Mandarin and only eating meat he had killed himself.

Fake News and Cambridge Analytica Scandal

After enduring criticism for the proliferation of fake news posts on his site leading up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg in early 2018 announced his personal challenge to develop improved methods for defending Facebook users from abuse and interference by nation-states.

"We won't prevent all mistakes or abuse, but we currently make too many errors enforcing our policies and preventing misuse of our tools," he wrote on his Facebook page. "If we're successful this year then we'll end 2018 on a much better trajectory."

However, Zuckerberg came under fire again a few months later when it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, had used private information from approximately 87 million Facebook profiles without the social network alerting its owners. The resulting outcry seemed to shake investors' confidence in Facebook, its shares dropping by 15 percent after the news became public.

Following a few days' silence, Zuckerberg surfaced on various outlets to explain how the company was taking steps to limit third-party developers' access to user information, and said he would be happy to testify before Congress. On Sunday, March 25, Facebook took out full-page ads in seven British and three American newspapers, penned in the form of a personal apology from Zuckerberg. He promised the company would investigate all of its apps, and remind users which ones they can shut off. "I’m sorry we didn’t do more at the time," he wrote. "I promise to do better for you."

Amid increasing calls for his resignation from investor groups, Zuckerberg traveled to Capitol Hill and met with lawmakers ahead of his two-day testimony, scheduled for April 10 and 11. The first day of hearings, with the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees, was considered a tame affair, with some senators seemingly struggling to understand the business model that powered the social media giant.

The follow-up hearing before House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee proved far testier, as its members grilled the Facebook CEO over privacy concerns. During the day's testimony, Zuckerberg revealed that his personal information was among the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica, and suggested that legal regulation of Facebook and other social media companies was "inevitable."

The negative PR seemingly did little to slow the company's progress, as Facebook rebounded to see its stock close at a record $203.23 on July 6. The surge bumped Zuckerberg past Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett to become the world's third-richest person, behind fellow tech titans Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates.

However, the gains were wiped out when Facebook shares dropped a staggering 19 percent on July 26, following an earnings report that revealed a failure to meet revenue expectations and slowing user growth, erasing nearly $16 billion of Zuckerberg's personal fortune in one day.

Info Source - Mark Zuckerberg

How did Mark Zuckerberg propose to Priscilla Chan?

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Dhaval Mehta·

Studied Computer Science

heres the answer... The Love Story of Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan

How is Mark Zuckerberg rich?

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Divya Dave

Mark Zukerberg and Elon Musk!Well answer is because of us! Yes its true.There us no doubt that Facebook is one of the largest social network with billions of users! And still there is no doubt that Facebook founder MARK ZUKERBERG is considered as one of the billionaire in the world. But how? Advertising When users log in and share their information like interests or share their info on the site Mark there itself start earning the money your 1 Like on the advertisements on the Margins of the Facebook Mark charges the fees from the advertisers so basically we are the markers of him! Smart move isn't it? Facebook has tied up with more than 50 companies and startups! Most of them are most popularly used apps and startups. Like Instagram ,WhatsApp and many more. He believe to join all the great founders together! Now guess what ma(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg manage to own 25% of Facebook?

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Patrick Mathieson

venture investor @ Toba CapitalGenerally speaking, these are the levers you can pull to minimize dilution during fundraising: * Don't raise a ton of money. * Negotiate a high valuation. * Wait until you can negotiate a high valuation to raise a ton of money (this is just restating the first two points). Let's see how this played out for Facebook using data that was helpfully organized by Dealbook: * Angel round (2004): $500k raised at a ~$5M cap, so +/- 10% dilution in exchange for sufficient funds to really begin developing & growing the platform. The team saves money by living/working together in a house in Palo Alto, taking pretty low or nonexistent salaries, et cetera. Good move. * Series A (2005): $12.7M raised at a ~$80M valuation, which is ~15% dilution.

How many hours a week does Mark Zuckerberg actually work at the Facebook office?

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Lee Byron

Worked at Facebook (company) (2008–2018)Originally Answered: Mark Zuckerberg, how many hours a week do you actually work at the Facebook office?

I sit near Mark at FBHQ so I'll speak from my experience.

He often arrives every morning before I do and is around after dinner working as well. I would say he is in the office roughly 9-10 hours a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes we have particularly exciting projects going on that have people volunteering their weekends and Mark might come by and see how things are going.

Mark occasionally travels and isn't in the office, but it seems like it's more likely that his appointments come to our headquarters than vice versa.

I should say that it's great to have him around with regularity and that he chooses to have the same desk set up as everyone else. He takes his job very seriously not just as a businessman but as a leader; he has helped keep our company culture what it is.

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What is it like to code with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Saket Pundlik

forever oldComing from a person with a non-coding background, it must be like: * Playing chess with Gary Kasparov * Acting with Marlon Brando * Singing with Frddie Mercury * Playing guitar with Jimi Hendrix * And most importantly, arguing with Sheldon Cooper First you will feel honoured, then you will be humbled.(more)

What kind of car does Mark Zuckerberg drive?

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Jason McHenry

Lives in Los Altos, CA

He is known to have a few but his daily driver is a black Volkswagen Golf MK6 GTI. He really ‘likes’ having dinner at Sumika in Los Altos and I see him ‘check in’ there kind of often.

And since he thinks it’s okay to play fast and loose with people’s private information I wonder how he’d feel if people were to, say, share a photo of his license plates or something? That’d probably not be very cool.

What are Mark Zuckerberg's strengths?

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Mohammed Raiyyan

looking for facebook internshipGreetings..!! Okay lets hop into the answer Zuck is likable & very friendly: Great posture in both the physical and philanthropic senses. Very intelligent yet seems down-to-earth and humble. Lacks at classic professionalism in day-to-day dressing but makes up for that with attitude and clean, neat clothing as well as good posture. Did I mention great posture? :) 1. He has a vision His vision was that of a more open and connected world. And throughout the growth of Facebook, he has stuck to his vision - that of a product that offers value while connecting people and building a world with more empathy. From the beginning, the frugal-living Zuckerberg was never in it for the money> He had a larger vision and not only thought ahead of where he wanted to take Facebook, but pushed himself and his te(more)

What is Mark Zuckerberg like in person?

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Marc Alessandro IV

Started an online business at 14 sold it 6 years later for an undisclosed amountJust like any other person. He doesn't talk about his wealth; money, cars, what have you. He's really down to Earth. He also doesn't really talk about business. We usually talk about mundane things, or about programming. It's also worth mentioning that I meet Zuckerberg in 08' 09'. It was a different world, but he was still very humble So in the end, he's just like you or me. He's just worth billions of dollars. I almost forgot he does talk alot about the books he is currently reading.  

What advice did Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz give Adam D'Angelo when he was leaving Facebook to start Quora?

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Manish Kumar Srivastav

Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India (2012–present)

Spread knowledge.

The immense contribution and change that Quora has brought is lowering the communication gap between pizzled and achievers. Your questions can be directly answered by prominent people. I feel that's immensely helpful to society.4.1K viewsView 31 upvotes311

Why does Mark Zuckerberg have a 99% approval rating from his employees?

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Amir Memon·

Muslim, Software Engineer

Because he is just that awesome.

There are several reasons why we "approve" of him:

  • The story: He built this billion user and billion dollar company from his dorm room, overcame one obstacle after another, and assembled a company with some of the most talented employees in the world.
  • The principles: He is dead-focused on "making the world more open and connected." The guy doesn't waver; all the investments in R&D and acquisitions have been along these lines.
  • The heart: He was the biggest donor of 2013, and is generally a minimalist. He is clearly committed to Internet.org, even though that's not necessarily where the short term revenue increases are. We really feel he wants to change the world for the better.
  • The guts: What other CEO has the... guts... to purchase a chat company for $19B??? It's a very smart purchase for various reasons, but still, $19B! Even other Silicon Valley CEOs acknowledge Zuck's fearlessness: http://read.bi/1n24ctW
  • The wisdom: When we hear him speak, he gives us brain wrinkles. He has this uncanny ability to make all the right strategic moves, and when he explains the reasons for making those moves, it simply makes sense. Sure, mistakes have been made, and hindsight is 20/20, but at decision time, it was for all the right reasons.
  • The trust: He doesn't make all the decisions, in fact far from it. We feel entrusted and empowered to drive our features the way we feel is best for the people that use Facebook. This is drastically different from many top-down corporations. We're happy with the balance between management-mandated and grass-roots-inspired decision making.
  • The character: He wears T-Shirts and jeans, talks with humility, and he just seems generally very approachable. We like that.
  • The business: Facebook is a rock solid business that is rapidly increasing in revenue as we speak. It makes more than 70% more in revenue than it was making just one year ago.
  • The free food and perks: Yes, this makes us like him and the company too. He has the ability to put an end to it at any time, but he keeps it coming :-). If somebody gives me free cookies, I like them, this part is not rocket science.


And, no, having a lower approval rating is not a good thing. People don't "approve" because they agree with everything, rather they know that they have a say, and that their opinion matters. It's a good thing to like your boss.

What are some of the evil aspects of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Vlad Usatii

Created readproduct.com to help users connect and share.

Mark Zuckerberg is an amazing entrepreneur.

But there is a point that all entrepreneurs get to where their attitude gets in the way of innovation. Mark is one of the few CEOs who doesn’t care about other brands. He wants his brand to succeed, but no one else's.

He isn’t moral — this is evident in how he views the world, crushing competition with simply upping ad pricing and upping gig posts on international job boards. If a brand is getting in the way with Facebook, he will straight up buy the business and never look back.

If someone will crush innovation and expansion, it may as well be the guy that doesn’t allow others to compete or innovate alongside him.

If we look at Zuck’s upbringing, he wanted to be a psychologist. This meant that, growing up, Mark had his own view on morality and even created websites to showcase the human psyche and its drawbacks. He stole a revolutionary idea from the one guy who dreamed it all up, made its premise into his own, and even told reporters something along the lines of: ‘I simply used the idea and made it better, as it was heading nowhere in the hands of the former.’

Zuck was a nerd, and with most nerds, there may be a root problem at hand. It could be that they don’t believe their knowledge tree is good enough, that their knowledge may be halted by the immediate realization that they aren’t the best, or it could simply be an inferiority complex, held down by the heightened social standing that stands as a proxy before their actions. Zuck created more and more and never looked at his haters or competition; he stomped competition with unethical, but ‘legal’ behavior, and created a storm of confusion among the crowd.

Some hate him for the fact that he looks like a psychopath (and nothing else to back the claim), but they may implicitly — instinctually — feel some sort of distrust in him because they deserve to think so.

After all, instinct has brought us this far.

Maybe Zuck will change, but his businesses will never stop behaving this way — the community has already been shaped.

What were the highlights of Mark Zuckerberg's testimony to Congress?

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Liam Ryan

Studied Master MarinerThe Highlights! – Well there were quite a few. I think seeing the equivalent of a linguistic gymnastics routine that finished with a big “Fuck You” “Shit Happens” and “Get over It” was probably the winner. Now I must confess this is not something I would usually take an interest in, nor would I usually watch but I wondered if Mr. Zuckerberg was going to try and explain what happened and the reasons why or just issue hollow meaningless words that looked to all appearances to have the veneer of an apology with no admissions of any wrong doing, which, is exactly what we got. Mr. Zuckerberg was able to emotionally frame his words in terms of a lack of action by saying “But it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough” What a nice linguistic trick to cover-up of the theft of our personal data by Camb(more)

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Mark Zuckerberg

How much is the per-day income of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Jeff Wilsbacher

Bay Area Native and lifelong residentAs a founder, he doesn’t trade time for money like most folks. Instead, he gets “a piece of the action” and gets to arbitrage other people's work and other people’s money. He makes money by buying low (people time/work) and selling high (advertizing/attention), and by organizing that work and sales. His net worth is around 70 billion. Today (2019, November 11) He was born 12,959 days ago. So, every day that he’s been alive he’s “made” around $5,401,651.36 every day (on average) since being born. But that’s pretty deceptive since he could have not started Facebook and gone on to do non-arbitrage work like most of us. He started Facebook 2004, February 4 (5,754 days ago). Using that start date he’s made around $12,165,450.12 a day. But that too might be deceptive since Facebook went public on 20(more)

How much of Facebook does Mark Zuckerberg own?

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Nat Burgess

Lives in Seattle, WA

In this matter, control is more interesting that dollars. Facebook structured its public offering so that Mark Zuckerberg retained over 50% of the voting shares in the company. The result is that Zuckerberg owns a minority of the fully diluted total shares outstanding, but a majority of the voting shares. Investors are skeptical of this type of arrangement because increases their risk. As shareholders they take financial risk on the value of the shares, but do not have an opportunity to participate in governance. For an individual investor this might not be a meaningful issue, but for large institutions that rely on active (and sometimes hostile) investors to force companies to take action, this is a high-risk scenario. Facebook was considered valuable enough that investors were willing to take the risk at the point of the IPO. Facebook has outperformed the market, and has not been targeted by activist investors.

Facebook listed Class A shares in their IPO. As of June 30, 2020, 2.879 billion Class A shares traded on NASDAQ. Class A shares have one vote per share. Class B shares, which are not traded on any public exchange, have 10 votes per share. Mark Zuckerberg owns approximately 57.9% of the Class B shares. Another approximately 12.5% are held by close friends and allies.

Zuckerberg owns just over 400 million shares total, valued on Friday 9/11/20 at approximately $105 billion.

Ann Dolcher

What programming languages does Mark Zuckerberg know?

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Douglas Green·March 29, 2016Works at Gleim PublicationsAccording to what appears to be his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder), he is a third-level C++ programmer. I also found an interesting source FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002 where his areas of expertise were apparently listed on his RentACoder profile as "Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C++, Java, Javascript, and ASP". Presumable he also knows PHP/Hack from working at Facebook. I didn't find any mention of him knowing Python, though.(more)

How does Mark Zuckerberg earn money through WhatsApp, as it is free and doesn’t even have ads?

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Moez Chandani·May 2, 2017Management Consultant. I enjoy studying businesses.

He doesn't. At least not right now.

Whatsapp currently has no revenue source. It originally began with a subscription based model where users were charged $0.99 a year to use the service. However, that's not a sustainable business model. Most of its 1.2 billion users (especially in developing nations) won't pay this amount, and Whatsapp would risk being overtaken by competitors who might offer similar services for free. This business model was therefore ditched.

Further, Whatsapp has traditionally been very very serious about maintaining customer privacy. One of its founders (and the current CEO of Whatsapp) Jan Koum grew up in USSR in the 80's where the government monitored nearly every action of its citizens, and this experience led him to take privacy seriously.[1] Whatsapp doesn't store chats on its servers, and all chats are end-to-end encrypted. They do not sell information about users to third party advertisers and in all probability will not do so in the near future.

However, Facebook will monetize Whatsapp in some form in the future (after all it's paid $19 billion for the app). Whatsapp can borrow a few ideas from Tencent which is hugely successful & highly profitable in China. Here are some possible avenues:

a) Incorporate mobile payments: This is probably going to happen in the near future. There was a flurry of news last month that Whatsapp may incorporate a UPI based payment system in India[2] . Basically, imagine PayTM and Whatsapp being integrated into a single app. You can settle bills with your friends, pay for your Uber rides, and pay at restaurants using your Whatsapp account. Whatsapp would earn money via transaction charges which would be levied on businesses WeChat has a similar service called WePay which is quite popular.

b) Use it for customer support: Whatsapp could also serve as a customer support tool. This is also something that should happen in the near future. Facebook has stated that they would

…test tools that allow you to use Whatsapp to communicate with businesses and organizations that you want to hear from.That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight.

Nearly every app today has a chat based support system integrated in it. Imagine replacing all of these with a Whatsapp based customer support system where you can contact companies directly from Whatsapp. It would simplify the process significantly. It would also be more efficient than tagging companies in tweets and posting on their Facebook pages to get attention.

c) Use it as a business tool: Another possible use here would be targeted messaging. Businesses could send targeted advertising messages to users who have specifically allowed these businesses to contact them. This could act as a replacement to sending emails or app notifications to users. So Zomato could offer special discounts to users who have enabled this service by sending them a Whatsapp message or by using the recently added Status tab on the app. Or MakeMyTrip could inform users about its latest offers via a Whatsapp Status.

d) Mobile gaming : WeChat in China earns most of its revenue from games incorporated in the app. While I am personally skeptical about how successful mobile games in apps would be in other countries, it can certainly be an option worth exploring.

In summary, while Whatsapp earns limited to no revenue currently, there is enough scope in the app to generate revenues via value added services.

Footnotes

Setting the record straight

WhatsApp will reportedly launch peer-to-peer payments in India within 6 months

What was Mark Zuckerberg like in high school?

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Lee Zhen Fung

Came to write, stayed to work

Just your every day geek. But he was quite engrossed in coding and even at one point had a tutor to teach him.

However, before you go and start learning to code, note that coding today and yesterday were both very different. He programmed the first FB prototype in months. Every programmer has his own set of code directives or designs,just as every carpenter has his tools. Presently we have lots of languages like coffeescript, python and ruby which might produce a similar Facebook clone faster.

I think Facebook now has its own language, considering the many data logistical challenges it faces, which might not be easily overcome by conventional code languages.

When Mark Zuckerberg first began building Facebook, what were his strengths and weaknesses as a developer?

Andy Vraun

I have read extensively about Facebook although I haven't worked at FB .

Strengths

1.Product driven approach : When start-ups start getting noticed there is significant pressure from the investors to get a revenue model and for FB, it was surely advertising. But Zuckerberg was adamant that he needs to build a cool product above anything else and so revenue wasn't any of his focus.

2.Fantastic Web Programming skills: He had already built a few successful products on the web and had a good knowledge of both system programming (logs....etc) and web.

3. Belief in his Idea: He faced a huge backlash from the users who felt uncomfortable with the news feed. But Zuckerberg was adamant on not rolling it back, he felt it was basic to what FB really was and then now, it is in facebook's core.

Weaknesses

1. Poor communication Skills: If you are a developer or anything else poor communication is always bad. His handling of internal matters was poor.

2. Rigidity in his beliefs (Rude): FB had their employees wear cool jeans (Think for a 40 year old man) to make FB appear as a cool place. He insulted some investors which , to a guy of his exposure was unprofessional.

How did Mark Zuckerberg learn to run a 200 billion dollar company?

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Richard Garand

Studying reality to prepare for the testOriginally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg learn how to run a 200 billion dollar company?

There is no set of skills that guarantees you can run any large company (sorry, MBAs!).

The foundation is understanding what is important in that business. Mark Zuckerberg probably can't run Procter & Gamble or an airline because their priorities are very different and not what he is good at.

What makes him good at understanding Facebook's priorities? Probably a combination of:

  • His natural interests aligned with what ended up being important in Facebook
  • His experience testing other ideas prior to starting Facebook, and then running Facebook, showed him what users value and how they react
  • Facebook's dominance means the market is defined by its priorities to some degree, further making his ideas more valuable

Having that foundation, and spending a lot of time translating it into action, typically means that you will be among the most influential people in whatever position you choose to work (employee, speaker, author, entrepreneur, consultant, or anything else).

However that's not enough. It might work if you're on your own or running a 10-person company. To run a $200 billion company is far more challenging and requires some additional skills to support the points above (in theory, this is what an MBA is about).

At that size you will face pretty much every challenge imaginable except those not applicable to your company / industry -- for example Facebook's latest quarterly report shows that they aren't feeling the effects of an economic slowdown because of their constant growth, so they don't have to manage business cycles yet.

Although many people share some part of these challenges, the unique ones tend to involve leadership and influence. Internally the CEO has to make sure all the employees understand what they need to do without being able to talk to each of them. Externally the CEO has to represent the company with the image that supports it in different areas such as marketing, government policy, and recruitment.

On top of this the CEO has to avoid being isolated by their influence and power. It can actually be difficult to understand what's really going on with employees and customers when you get most of your information from people whose boss is a billionaire (and thus are more careful about what they say).

Every CEO of a large company had to learn these at some point. Mark Zuckerberg just put them into practice a little faster, and handled it very well.

There is only one way you can do that: with help from other people. This includes talking with CEOs in a similar position, having mentoring from investors or retired CEOs, and hiring people who are good at managing their area and making the most of it while contributing to the company's bigger goals.

It also takes a lot of personal skills since you will have to admit you are wrong often, manage your time effectively, and work well with many other people. Very good advisors and mentors can also help with these if you have a certain level of willingness to begin with.

Finally to put this all together it takes a very high level of drive. Although some of these things may seem to come naturally a lot of them will be difficult. Very few people are willing to put forth the level of effort over a long time that it takes to do this.6.2K viewsView 18 upvotes18

What time does Mark Zuckerberg go to bed?

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Sean Dean

Blogs about getting better sleep

Mark Zuckerberg famous sleeps very little and is a bit of a night owl. When he was programming about 10 years ago, he would keep 'programming hours' and stay up until 6 am or even 8am.

Mark Zuckerberg, photo taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zuckerberg

Now, he has to keep more orthodox business hours so has to get up earlier as you point out. It is reported he only sleeps for five hours a night, so that would mean if he now gets up at 5 am, he would go to bed at 12 am.

Source: Amazing – 10 Successful People Who Hardly Sleep

Check this out if you're interested in becoming an entrepreneur

From where do Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg get their intelligence?

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Adam Pittenger·

CEO of Moved (moved.com). Building, learning, writing.

It's difficult to say that their intelligence from X, Y, or Z. It's not so black and white.

First - It's important to note that intelligence comes in many forms. Some people might say "Book Smarts vs Street Smarts" but that barely scratches the surface.

For example, looking at the guys mentioned in the question, it is largely regarded that Mark Zuckerberg is a superior technical talent than Steve Jobs ever was. Jobs, however, was an incredible marketer and public speaker; something Zuck has had to work on over the years. So, while Jobs' level of social and emotional intelligence was probably much greater than Zuck's, Mark is more capable of working with his team to come up with the best technical solution for his product.

So... who is smarter? As you can see, the line is blurred.

All of this leads to saying that: the general term of "intelligence" here is probably better defined as the sum of their "strengths".

Each has their own strengths (and weaknesses, of course) that have made them successful entrepreneurs. This can be writing code, negotiating a deal, developing a strategy, etc.


Now that we've framed this, the real question is..
"How did their strengths become such strengths?"

  • CURIOSITY.
    These guys are hungry for knowledge. Hungry to better themselves and and learn as much as they can. Read, read, read... and read some more. You'll soak in so much and retain more than you realize. Doing so will lead to "lightbulb moments" later on, as your brain starts to make connections that others don't.
  • PRACTICE.
    Like any sport or craft, you get better with experience. So you have to just go out there and do it. The more you do it, the better you become. Were any of these guys great CEOs from Day 1? No. They may have qualities that made them okay, but I'm sure they were better CEOs after Year 1, Year 2, etc.
  • NETWORK.
    Lean on others. Generally, unless they suck, the people around you will want to help. You should continue to build your network with smart, experienced people that you can trust. (Make sure you're helping them as well!) This creates a healthy back-and-forth where, given your lack of knowledge or experience in a certain area, you can tap your network to get some help and guidance.


As mentioned above, my response here barely scratches the surface of the much larger topic of "intelligence". It's a topic I love to explore and am constantly fascinated with at a personal level.

Ultimately, if you want to be an entrepreneur - go be one. If you want to be like those guys - work your ass off and do it.

Never stop learning. Never stop improving.

How intelligent is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Paul McDonnell

Director and Founder at AIGaming.com (2017–present)

How smart is Mark Zuckerberg?

Mark Zuckerberg is ridiculously, pretty much off the charts smart.

  • Learnt programming at a very young age when this was much harder to do.
  • Even at this young age was applying programming to interesting problems for example when he created a network connecting his dad’s dental office to his home office.
  • Launched Facebook when so many smart people were trying to do something similar and made a success of it without previous comparable business experience.
  • Possibly the most outstanding: buying Instagram for a price which most at the time assumed to be ridiculously over priced but has turned out to be just the opposite: Here’s why Facebook’s $1 billion Instagram acquisition was such a great deal
  • Continues to dominate the social media space after such a long time.

The breadth of skill this man has is what really gets me. He cannot be boxed into one category: there are many great software developers, but he is one whilst understanding user acquisition and retention like almost no one else.11.8K viewsView 17 upvotes171

Would you vote for Mark Zuckerberg if he ran for president?

What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg was born in India?

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Shubhi Agarwal

Voracious Reader and Super FoodieOriginally Answered: What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg were born in India?

Had Mark Zuckerburg been born in India, he would not have got into IITs, i guess. That's because just a very good interest and curiosity into computers or programming is definitely not a prerequisite to clear IITJEE. And what I have read about him, he would not have slogged for 2 years mugging up school and coaching curriculum for Phy, Cem and Math. So he would have been in a 2nd-3rd tier engineering college, or may have even taken a Humanities course.

Meanwhile he would have kept his curiosity getting the better of him, by learning from other sources on internet (having found his interest wavering to programming/hacking et al), and doing his self-study and experimentation. Probably, he would even have become an intern at a startup or an IT major. Given that, he would have developed on his computing skills on his own, he may even have got hired by the company.

Having partially learnt there by using their resources, and partially by his own mind, he would have created a similar (if not exactly same) prototype, and would have got support from his current employers to take it ahead. And in few years time (slower than the actual case), he would have slowly come into picture, with his own little startup.

India is full of such IT startups, where people started small, and slownly gained momentum. It would require longer than Harvard, but would not be an impossibility, given the guy's hunger to get something working for himself, by hook or by crook. :)

P.S. This is taking into picture the scenario, where Zuckerburg was born in an average middle class family and can afford a decent education.1.7K viewsView 4 upvotes42

Is Mark Zuckerberg really a visionary?

Syed Usama Ahmed

Indian in CanadaOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg really that visionary?

Yes of course he is and any CEO would be to take his company to new heights and new platforms. He reveled his grand vision about For The Next 10 Years Of Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg said that next year Facebook would be making a series of aggressive talent and ad-tech investments that would set it up for a successful future.

But that could mean Facebook's expenses increase up to 70%.

Zuckerberg also outlined his three-, five-, and 10-year plan for the company.

In summary, he wants to have multiple Facebook products — WhatsApp, Messenger, Search, Video, NewsFeed, Oculus, and Instagram — each connect 1 billion users. Once those have reached mass scale, then he'll start to aggressively monetize them.

He also wants to improve the advertising experience for brands, particularly on mobile. Facebook will be investing in ways to better target and measure campaigns through data. It wants to help brands measure online to offline sales conversions. Currently, advertisers spend only about 11% of their budgets on mobile, according to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, because the right tools aren't in place.

Finally, Facebook wants to build the next major computing platform, which Zuckerberg believes could be augmented reality and Oculus. He also wants to bring the internet to more people through Internet.org.

"We're going to prepare for the future by investing aggressively," Zuckerberg said.

"The strength of the business today is putting us in a strong position to invest in the future," Wehner added.

Here's the transcript of Zuckerberg's plan, Seeking Alpha:

On previous calls, you’ve heard me talk about our big company goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms. These goals are important for us and part of our foundation of our strategy for the next decade, but achieving these will involve many different efforts and steps along the way, some that will be achieved rapidly and others that are going to take longer.

So with that in mind, I’d like to run through our progress this quarter on the different efforts that we expect to deliver a lot of impact over the next three, five and 10 years.

Let's begin with our three-year goals. Over the next three years, our main goals are around continuing to grow and serve our existing communities and businesses and help them reach their full potential.

When you look at the size and engagement of our community, our progress remains very strong. 864 million use Facebook every day and across our core products, we continue to see huge engagement. For example around 700 million people now use Facebook Groups every month. Achieving this scale shows that we're delivering experiences for the way that people want to share and connect.

Another example is our progress on public content. Last quarter I talked about how we're working to connect people around important public moments and personalities on Facebook. This quarter we've continued to build on our results and there are now more than 1 billion interactions every week between public figures and their fans on Facebook.

The investments we have made in video have also played a big part here. This quarter we announced a new milestone for video on Facebook achieving 1 billion video views, a day of made of videos. During the summers the ice bucket challenge drew more than 10 billion video views by 440 million people which is a good sign of how far our video product has come.

Instagram has also made a lot of progress this quarter. In August, the Instagram team launched Hyperlapse, a standalone app for time lapse of videos on iOS. The team has also invested heavily in improving the speed and performance of Instagram on Android. This has helped drive Instagram's strong international growth which in some countries has achieved more than 100% year-over-year growth. Globally, people using Instagram now spend around 21 minutes a day on average using the app. This is a strong figure compared to the industry and a good sign that Instagram's strategy is on the right path. Our other big focus over the next three years is to continue to serving businesses well and creating a lot of value for marketers.

As our results show, our approach here is working. To continue delivering value for businesses, we work to improve the quality of ads and news feed by reducing low quality content and improving our targeting to show more timely and relevant content. We’ve also made some big advances in our ad tech, most importantly the launch of our new Atlas platform. Atlas offers marketers a lot of new capabilities to help reach people across devices, platforms and publishers as well as improving measurement in online campaign. We're very excited for the future of Atlas and Cheryl is going to talk more about this in a moment.

Next, let's talk about our strategy over the next five years. Over the next five years, our goals are around taking our next generation of services, Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp and Search and helping them connect billions of people and become important businesses in their own right.

One big priority for us here is messaging. And continuing to build and grow Messenger and now WhatsApp as well as great services. This quarter we made an important change to our mobile messaging efforts by transitioning people to Messenger on iOS, Android and Windows Phone. We believe that this change allows us to offer a better and faster messaging experience on mobile, and our data shows that people who use Messenger, usually respond to messages about 20% faster.

This month we also completed our acquisition of WhatsApp. I'm excited to be working with this team and John to join our Board. WhatsApp continues to be on a path to connect more than 1 billion people around the world and we're going to be working into accelerate their efforts here. Another key part of our strategy is helping developers to build more great social experiences on our platform.

Over the next few years, our goal is to make Facebook a cross-platform platform that allows developers to build, grow and monetize their apps across every major mobile platform. We’ve continued to make good progress here. This quarter, we opened our audience networks to all developers and publishers, allowing over 1.5 million advertisers on Facebook to extend their campaigns across mobile and for developers to begin monetizing their apps.

We're also excited by the continued adoption of App Links, our deep-linking technology for mobile apps. App Links is now used by hundreds of apps across iOS, Android and Windows phone and in just the past six months, the developers have created links to more than 3 billion individual destinations in these apps.

Now let's talk about how we're approaching our goals over the next 10 years.For the next 10 years our focus is on driving the fundamental changes in the world that we need to achieve our mission, connecting the whole world, understanding a world with big leaps in AIs and developing the next generation of platforms, especially in computing.

This is a very big period, a very busy period for our efforts with Internet.org. In July we worked with Airtel to launch the Internet.org app in Zambia. This provides free data access to a set of basic internet services for health, education, employment and communication. The results from this are very encouraging. We've already heard a lot amazing stories about how people are using the internet to add value to their lives. We hope to bring Most Popular Websites & Email|Good Home Page|Top 500 Sites|The Internet.org app to many more countries soon.

Over the last few months, I've also travelled to several countries and met with policy makers, key distributors and people and communities that are coming online for the first time. Increasingly industry and governments are seeing expanding internet access as one of their core priorities. This is positive development for our work with Internet.org in our long-term goal of connecting everyone in the world.

Finally, let's talk for a minute about our progress of Oculus. As I've said before, with Oculus, we're making a long-term bet on the future of computing. Every 10 to 15 years, a new major computing platform arrives and we think that virtual and augmented reality are important parts of this upcoming next platform. This quarter, Oculus continued to make progress towards this vision.

In September, the first Oculus developer conference took place, where we announced a new prototype VR headset on the path of a consumer version of the Rift. We continue to see a lot of excitement in the developer community and we've now shipped more than 100,000 of Rift developer kit to over a 130 countries. It's still early for Oculus but we are encouraged to see the variety of apps and games being developed for this platform.

Internet.org and Oculus are just two of the huge opportunities ahead. Our efforts here will take longer to achieve their full impact, but we're going to continue preparing for the future by investing aggressively. So that’s how we’re approaching our strategy over the next three, five and 10 years, while focusing on our big goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms.

This has been a quarter with strong results. I want to thank the entire Facebook community, our employees, our partners and our stockholders for their continued support. Because of your contribution, Facebook continues to grow in strength and to create greater value in the world for people, partners and businesses. We have a long journey ahead, we’re on the right path and I'm excited about the progress that we’re making.While the Home is Massive, Its Interiors Aren't Ostentatious

Unlike the homes of most billionaires, the Palo Alto-based home of Mark Zuckerberg, is understated. He purchased this 5,617-square-foot home in May 2011, a year before he married Priscilla Chan. The Crescent Park house comes with a saltwater pool, glassed-in sun room, five bedrooms, and five bathrooms.

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Mark Zuckerberg's home is worth 7 million dollars

It's Close to Work

The home is situated near Facebook's offices in Menlo Park—just a 10-minute drive. Built in 1903, the Silicon Valley home is a ‘no frills' abode. Mark Zuckerberg's home has a large outdoor space—great for parties. There is an entertainment pavilion, fireplace, barbeque area and a spa. The bathroom comes with heated floors and a deep soaking tub made out of marble. The interiors comprise wood flooring and traditional furniture.

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This home is only among one of the many homes owned by Zuckerberg

The Exteriors Are Barbecue and Picnic-Ready Spots

The outdoor spaces are marvels in themselves, uplifting the widely known sunny Californian lifestyle of the west coast. Equipped with a soothing garden saltwater pool, the backyard also projects a tasteful, natural rusticity with its waterfall crested pond. This home is the perfect spot for hosting mega Silicon Valley parties and its outdoor pavilion has been privy to some of California's coolest barbecue socials. Both the front and back porches of the house showcase comfortable wicker patio furniture sets, further highlighting the inherently homely feel of the house.

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Photo caption: The Facebook CEO's home is the perfect spot for hosting mega Silicon Valley parties

Amenities Like No Other

One of the most luxurious spots in the house is the master bathroom that comes equipped with heated floors and an opulent marble, deep soaking tub. Rendered with a subtle palette of beige and cream, the mellow lighting together with the glossy materials of the bathroom set the scene for an indulgent spa day.

The house consists of also a world-class feature: The Facebook Canon. Located right next to the master bedroom closet, this machine-of-sorts deploys Zuckerberg's uniform grey, office t-shirt upon his command. This fascinating and playful feature render's the mansion with a spectacular individualism.

And Yes, the Home Does Have a Friendly Bot

Being a tech and software genius, the Zuckerberg mansion is inevitably equipped with a personal AI assistant called ‘Jarvis.' Set up with the voice of Morgan Freeman, Jarvis recognises guests at the front door with its powerful imaging and voice sensing abilities. Extremely tactile and responsive, this digital spectacle also wakes up the CEO's daughter Maxima every morning, with a Mandarin lesson.

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Zuckerberg's home has its own home assistant Jarvis who's voice is given by Morgan Freeman

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More on  mark zuckerberg

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Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook

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Can India produce a Mark Zuckerberg?

Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here onYEET?  Anonymous  

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Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

Anonymous

Originally Answered: Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

OK I got this.
WHy do you think that mark zuckerberg is on Quora? Do you think is he here because he has no other work to do,or just for passing time or for increasing his credits? No,my dear friend,Mark is not in the need of any credits,he alerady has a multi-billlion dollar company. I'll tell you why he is here:
Just take a view at the questions asked by him.
He is here to know about how people are responding to facebook,which he can never,ever know on facebook. He can get free,cheap feedback here on quora which would be impossible and much expensive to implement on facebook. So why not use quora,where anxious people are dying to answer for free?
Plus he is here to know about his rival companies, microsoft,foursquare etc. In short,he is here just for a free for all survey for which there does not exist a better platform than this. Please have a look at the link i provided to the questions asked by him.2.9K viewsView 9 upvotesView shares91

Is Keiana Cavé the next Elon Musk/Mark Zuckerberg?

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Brian Farley  Molecular biologist turned biotech data scientist

This is what we’ve come to, friends. Because I’m not terribly interested in being sued for libel, I declare that everything contained in this answer expresses my personal opinion.

I mean no disrespect to Keiana, but the feel-good story of the young, brilliant, entrepreneurial “scientist” is a perennial, egregious failure of science “journalism”. Every year, it seems as though there’s yet another plucky high school senior who has invented and intends to sell a product that will change the world. The cesspool of reportage surrounding the budding scientist breathlessly lionizes their youth and ambition while granting only a passing mention — a sentence or two at best — to what they actually did.

This is an incredible disservice to both the scientific community and the public at large. First, it commits (in my opinion) the cardinal sin of science reporting: focusing on the scientist at the expense of the science. I understand that the ultimate goal of most reporting these days is to attract eyeballs and clicks to drive the rate at which the attention of readers can be sold to the highest bidder, and that narratives like these are easy viral feel-good stories. Who isn’t moved by the potential of extremely gifted students? However, because these stories represent such cherished narratives, scientific due diligence doesn’t happen.

It is precisely when we have a vested interest in something being true that we are compelled to be as skeptical about it as possible. However, the needs and wants of mass media and the general public are at cross purposes to scientific skepticism, so it doesn’t happen.

Perhaps the most egregious example of the media failing to do their homework and valuing personal narratives over scientific soundness is Jack Andraka, the Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer. Essentially, at the age of 15, Jack Andraka claimed to have invented a cheap, reliable test for pancreatic cancer and was celebrated by a wide variety of outlets. However, the test was founded on flawed science, didn’t work as promised, and was never fully described in a way that allowed for expert vetting. However, by investing so much effort and praise in Jack Andraka the scientist instead of Jack Andraka’s flawed science, the media put itself in an untenable position that was difficult to back out of.

I don’t believe that this is happening in this specific case, but this is one of the major pitfalls associated with this style of reporting. Celebrating the scientist before the science itself is vetted is irresponsible at best, and disgusting free advertising for a product at worst.

Secondly, any celebratory narrative about individual scientists (regardless of their age) is wrong. Contemporary science is not performed by individuals in isolation, but instead by large collaborative teams. Singling out one or even a few individuals for recognition is not only unfair to other members of the team, but is also a misrepresentation of how science is performed (but, hey, a charismatic representative helps sell product, so I understand why it happens).

Third, and perhaps worst, is that stories like these completely and totally undercut the reality that scientific research is HARD. Meaningful contributions to science are not and can not be made by solo actors over a six month span. This isn’t because insights are particularly difficult to come by, but instead, because the grinding path to making sure that your favorite ideas and hypotheses are correct requires meticulous experimentation to rule out as many reasonable competing hypotheses as you can think of. Being brilliant isn’t enough; you also have to be hard-working, dedicated, and meticulous. Science is and should be slow, because there’s too much at stake to rush and be wrong — but the science “journalism” that describes these discoverers is a significant threat to that.

Whenever you see a story like this reported by the mainstream media, you shouldn’t feel good — you should be angry.

How can I send Mark Zuckerberg a message he will read?

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Alon Amit

Former Product Manager (Ads) at Facebook (company)The short but honest answer is that you can't. There isn't any scalable way Zuck could let anyone in the world message him privately and read all those messages. Even if you happen to guess his personal e-mail address or work e-mail address, the chances that he'll read a message from someone he doesn't know and is not referred by anyone he does know are very, very small. This isn't because he's mean or indifferent - it's just because he's a highly visible individual with a particularly large number of people who wish to communicate with him, for a wide variety of reasons. Whatever it is you wish to achieve by sending Mark Zuckerberg a private message, there are possibly other approaches which are a lot more likely to be successful. Not knowing anything about your goal, it's hard to sugges(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in "The Social Network"?

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Jimmy Wales·

Wikipedia, Wikia, WikiTribuneOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in the movie "The Social Network"?

I know a few of the people who are depicted in the movie including Mark Zuckerberg and Sean Parker. I have heard some people comment on the movie in a way that I think is accurate: the worst thing about the movie is that as a movie it is actually pretty good, which means that it tells a compelling story.

Unfortunately, not much of that story is actually true.

Let's take one of the key elements of the movie - the suggestion that Mark created Facebook because a girl dumped him. There's that silly "Rosebud" (reference to Citizen Kane) moment at the end when he's shown sadly reloading her profile page. It's a great story, could come straight out of a dramatic Bollywood movie, but it actually has no resemblance to reality. Mark is still married to the woman he was dating when he started Facebook.

If you think Mark is obsessed with money, for example, you're missing the point there as well. I remember once sitting at a table with him, the Google guys, etc., and they were all talking about their jets. As one does, haha. I turned to Mark and said "Do you have a jet?" And he responded with genuine bewilderment: "How would I ever have a jet?" Facebook was already huge and valued in the billions. For all I know, he may have one by now (and why not?), but it wasn't of any interest to him and not a goal that he held.

Similarly, Sean Parker's character in the movie is not really accurate. It has some semblance of accuracy in a way. Sean does like to throw extravagant parties. But what is missing is his cleverness and basic sense of humanity. Do you know what he likes to talk about privately? Money, babes, power? No, actually, he's really got strong academic interests in medical research. He's a geek, and I mean that in the good way.

So, I would approach the movie as fiction - entertaining fiction - but try not to let it color your understanding of the people involved.1.6M viewsView 40,307 upvotesView shares · Answer requested by Midhun Darvin40.3K21191

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What is it like to be interviewed by Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ashwin AJ

Being Engineer I only have experience of giving interview...Originally written by: Charlie Cheever At a birthday party in Belltown (a neighborhood of Seattle,) I ran into Dave Fetterman and Andrew 'Boz' Bosworth who I knew from school, and they had some news: "Guess what? We're quitting our jobs at Microsoft and going down to Silicon Valley to work at Facebook!" I liked Fetterman and Boz and thought they were smart and hearing this made me think that Facebook might actually be a legitimate company where I might find good people to work with. I ended up searching through my Blackberry for the e-mail Facebook had sent me and replying to it from the party. When I interviewed at Facebook, I remember being especially impressed by Dustin and Adam and the plans they outlined for what could be done next with Facebook, in particular news feed. Also, James(more)

Why does Mark Zuckerberg cover his headphone jack with tape?

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Hafiz Rahman

Worked at EntrepreneurshipI covered my laptop's cam for years since I first found out how easy it was to plant a malware on someone's computer. In my case, I planted one on my friend's PC from a video attachment she requested through YM back in my college days. It was just a joke but then I realized that I could turn on her webcam without her knowing (she had a webcam with no lights on it). I could browse her PC, listen to her while she types, copy some files and even make the system crash. I removed the malware straightaway before I think of anything worse. At that time, I thought "if I can do it with little effort, why couldn't those with better hacking skills do a lot worse?" But success at first try didn't stop me just yet. I tried several more times to different people I know, and succeed in some but failed t(more)

What kind of cellphone does Mark Zuckerberg use?

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BIll Wanfeng

Lived in ChinaOriginally Answered: Which phone does Mark Zuckerberg use the most?

must be iphone10K viewsView 13 upvotes132

Has money and power corrupted Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ron Maimon

Lives in New York CityPeople are not corrupted by money and power, at least not in the naive way it is imagined. They are always just doing what they think is best, but when their company becomes enormous, their power becomes enormous, so they tend to engage in terribly desctructive behavior, but this is behavior that would not be predatory and harmful if their business were small, under those circumstances it would be beneficial. Acquiring a competitor and merging is not a problem for two small businesses. It sometimes makes sense. But gobbling up a small competitor when you are a giant means subjecting the management of the company to the dominance of an external bureaucracy which no one person is fully in control of. This squelches the creativity of the small company, in no small part because you have made a(more)

Does Mark Zuckerberg believe in privacy?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

Do not take this as an official statement from or about Facebook's stance towards privacy. It is also written in the form of an answer towards Anon User's comment in Blake Ross's answer below.

I don't really know what Zuck's approach to privacy is, but I do think he has a more nuanced and insightful view of it than most people do.

I do think that his product policies around privacy do more to reflect what he is reading from user desires (not advertisers and certainly not profit-seeking - the most naive interpretation of Facebook's privacy policies is that they are somehow driven by a desire for profit [1]) than anything else. Users ("average people") don't really think about privacy very deeply, and don't understand what it is or its interplay between their other values, and often make choices where they deprioritize privacy against other values, and this is reflected in their behavior and usage of the site, which Zuck is keenly aware of as a product and user-oriented CEO.

My observation of Facebook as a company (its people, including its executives) is that it cares a lot about privacy. It spends a lot of time thinking about it, it spends a lot of time thinking about how to protect its users' privacy, and then (ironically) it is continually surprised at how the vast majority of its users don't end up really caring at all to make use of various privacy-protection mechanisms built into the products. There are public flare-ups, but these are subject to a selection bias, in that there aren't flare-ups when people don't have a privacy issue (i.e. it is more a symptom of how often Facebook deals with privacy issues rather than how well/poorly it does). Instead, the company is often in a position of balancing user desires for a less-private product with its own feelings that user privacy needs to be protected more.

Consider: a product exists which can allow you, a user, to invade the privacy [to some degree, along a fairly muddy continuum] of other users. These users include your friends, family, and certain strangers. In return, it allows other people to invade your privacy in the same way, but you often don't know when they are doing it. I use the word "invade" here not to mean "cross some system-designed boundary," but in the muddier sense of "seeing some information I've technically made accessible but didn't think too much about and therefore would feel a little uncomfortable if certain people saw it." This is the root of most privacy "issues."

The problem is that the vast majority of users spend their time using Facebook to, essentially, invade the privacy of those around them (and of strangers they find interesting), and generally request feature modifications to enhance their ability to do so. They want profiles of strangers to be more public (so they can e.g. tell if someone is a former classmate), they want apps to be able to pull information about their friends (because the app is supposedly part of Facebook, so why can't it do so?), they want to see this and that which their friends want to hide from them. Almost no one says "I want my information to be more hidden by default and I would find the product more useful to me if it was so for everyone else."

The essential problem with privacy as a right is that it is not understood by most people in the way that other rights are. Most people understand that, e.g. the right to property is a reciprocal right: you want your property rights respected, and in turn you are willing to not steal things from others. This is not so with privacy. Plenty of people read with gushing delight the lurid details and gossip of celebrities or other semi-private individuals (like high-profile crime cases) - and demand a "right" to do so - when they would not be comfortable exposing such details about their own lives. How many of you, despite Tiger Woods specifically stating the the details of his affairs should be a private matter, nevertheless read the news reports about him and, in some cases, even looked up more information? Did you realize you were callously violating his privacy, providing the demand for tabloid articles? That's exactly the demand that users place on Facebook every day, wanting to invade the privacy of their friends, family, and acquaintance-strangers.

Mark Zuckerberg, having helmed the company from its earliest days, is pretty familiar and realistic about this being the zeitgeist of the userbase, as are many long-time employees, and he and many long-time employees are able to think about privacy in this way - i.e. both about privacy and about how people really think and act about privacy. Most of the company (owing to fast growth, the majority of the employee base at any one time has been there for less than 2 years) holds the realization of these user desires in a sort of mild horror and reluctance.

Therefore, my interpretation of the reality behind that quote (unsourced) is that Mark Zuckerberg probably cares about privacy, but he probably also understands it in a far deeper way than most people do, because he has to work with it in a real and practical sense, and so if he "doesn't believe in it," it's in the way that someone doesn't "believe in" a primitive and unexamined view of something when he has had to personally develop a fuller and deeper understanding of it.


Again:

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

----

[1] One of the most naive and oft-repeated interpretations of every action Facebook takes is that it is being done out of an desire to maximize profits. These are often incorrect. A close study of Facebook's actions over its history will indicate that the company - and in particular Mark Zuckerberg - have deliberately and repeatedly made decisions that defer or even reduce revenue potential in pursuit of other goals.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg always wear the same shirt?

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Sai

IT Analyst at Dell International (2016–present)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had his first-ever public Q&A session on Thursday.

He answered a lot of questions, but the one that got a lot of interest was, “Why do you wear the same T-shirt every day?”

For those who haven’t noticed, Zuckerberg wears the same gray T-shirt at most public events. While many expected a playful response, Zuckerberg gave a pretty serious answer for his penchant to wear the same gray shirt.

"I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community," Zuckerberg said, after clarifying that he had "multiple same shirts."

He said even small decisions like choosing what to wear or what to eat for breakfast could be tiring and consume energy, and he didn't want to waste any time on that.

"I'm in this really lucky position, where I get to wake up every day and help serve more than a billion people. And I feel like I'm not doing my job if I spend any of my energy on things that are silly or frivolous about my life," he said.

Zuckerberg pointed out that numerous other influential people, like Apple founder Steve Jobs or President Barack Obama, have the same theory with regards to choosing their outfits. Jobs, in fact, told biographer Walter Isaacson that he even wanted to have all Apple employees wear the same vest.

João Paulino·

Lived in Angola (2017–2017)

Hi, Mark Zuckerberg. I am African and I live in Angola. I am experiencing great economic difficulties in relation to the financing of my studies (higher education) after the death of my brother I no longer have where to turn. I ask the world that I have the opportunity to study, but it is difficult to find someone so charitable about it. Please help me

My email: joaopaulino07@hotmail.com1.

What are the things Adam D'Angelo taught Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ravi Mishra

Just another engineerMark Zuckerberg said that he learned a lot from Adam D'Angelo. This is the original blog post by Aaron Greenspan. Writing :: The Lost Chapter and this is the article on business insider. In Alleged New IMs, Mark Zuckerberg Says There Are Only '6 People In The World With Good Ideas'(more)

Why doesn't Mark Zuckerberg date supermodels?

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Will Chou

Lived in Washington, DC

Mark is a nerd. And people have different interests and tastes.

He gets more enjoyment from programming and building a business than he does from traveling the world, living on yachts, playing with dolls, creating music, or dating models.

It’s shocking to believe and I get you because I used to find it hard that other people didn’t share my interests and passions too. How come someone not see the beauty in star wars or how awesome a girl’s butt is?

But the truth is that people can have widely different views and values, though most people share similarities (think the standard bell curve).

Mark was obsessed with building and growing Facebook and that’s what he did.

He had a girl that was smart, going to be a doctor, loyal, honest, and hard working. Likely, he valued these traits, as you should, because they indicate a strong partner and (also coincidentally a strong employee to hire).

There are more and different things to value than just the superficial. Believe me, it’s hard for me to fathom too even though I understand it on a logical level because my genetics spur me to dramatically overemphasize the physical.

A lot of people imagine the supermodel to have a glamorous life and nothing but fantastic qualities: jet-setting around the world, rich, famous, beautiful, successful, ambitious, hard working … right?

But I’ve followed some of these girls on youtube via their vlogs and other social media and there lives aren’t ideal for a relationship. Because of work, they’re always traveling and never in the same city for long, which makes maintaining a relationship hard because it’s long distance.

Also, they’re constantly bombarded with different people they’re meeting, photoshoots, tempations, and parties.

While there is definitely hard work involved, luck plays more of a role in this field. The industry is built on reaching your peak earning potential while still very young (20 when most people live until their 80’s) so it is a breeding ground for people to get arrogant and large egos about their ability when a lot of it was due to their genetic luck around their beauty and dimensions.

It’s super easy and tempting to overemphasize the beauty of a woman over everything else, I fall for it too and it’s the natural thing for most men to do. Other CEO’s, like the CEO of Snapchat and Elon Musk, and band leaders, like Adam Levine, are dating or married to Victoria’s Secret models likely for this reason.

These models are typically seen by society as what society chooses as the “most beautiful women on earth” (whether or not that is true is debatable but you get the point). And many men fall for this as a measuring stick for their ego by showing off that they can get these highly desirable women at the top of the ego, often forsaking other qualities or overlooking other traits (empathy, emotional intelligence, hustle, ambition, caring, etc.) for this title.

And maybe that’s why Elon’s two times divorced. But maybe not.

How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg?

Anonymous

Originally Answered: How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg? Its an emergency situation

Oh my goodness, that is so cute on multiple levels.

  1. You think 'inspiring' a group of college students is an emergency
  2. You think it is such an emergency that you could compel a billionaire to fly to New York or otherwise participate in some fashion

I'm shocked. Are people in this world really so naive? What could possibly make you think you could get any help to inspire a group of apathetic millennials?4.2K viewsView 15 upvotes15

How good of a programmer is Mark Zuckerberg and does he still sometimes code for Facebook?

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Dakini Alexandra Isenegger·

CEO @Linkilaw | Forbes 30 Under 30 | Top Writer 2017 & 2018In 2006, Zuckerberg gave up coding to focus on running the business of Facebook. When visiting Nigeria in August 2016, he admitted publicly that giving up coding to manage his company was "a little sad"."There is an elegance to writing code that I miss," Zuckerberg said during a Q&A session with tech entrepreneurs and developers in Lagos, Nigeria. "The code always does what you want - and people don't." Even though he has expressed love for programming, Zuckerberg majored in psychology, not computer science. His peers don’t place him in the uppermost tier of skilled coders. On TopCoder, a site where coders improve and rank their skills, he's only in the third level. Adam D'Angelo — the former CTO of Facebook and founder of Quora — is in the top level, "red." (The ranking goes grey, green, b(more)

What was it like to go to Harvard with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Aamer Tahseen

Back on this site...for nowMy dad used to go with him for a temporary study computer science so he told me the story of the Facebook experience from his point of view. At the time Zuckerberg was a prodigy, and he always won the attention of the teachers, every time my dad used to raise his hand during lectures, the professor would still ignore him, even though Zuckerberg wasn't even listening in class he would be picked. As the year passed by, and Zuckerberg was slowly coming into the development of "Facebook", my father always noticed his wide interests in social communications, at the time, for undergraduates there would be something called a "face book", a collage for names and pictures of students, my dad didn't even care because, but he did notice that Zuckerberg was always fascinated by that and he always sp(more)

Why is Mark Zuckerberg's Twitter user name finkd?

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Samuel E. Koranteng

There's a silver lining to all this global chaos, and Mark believes that. After Mark stopped visiting New York when his cousin was robbed by amateur droids, he ventured down a new path of telekinetic travel. It was on one of these trips that he met Finkelton! -an unusually tiny species of alien who advised him to acquire a billion dollars in 3 month. Thus Facebook was born. That Twitter name is a memorial to one of Mark's best advisers from outer space, who was incinerated three months ago. Disclaimer: Mark mentioned here is Mark Jupalopa of Senegal, and the writer reserves the right to humorous answers.

How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

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Adam Rifkin

Better to be a Founder than a Loser.Originally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing?

The valuation jumps from round to round were orders of magnitude until Facebook hit a $15 billion valuation, resulting in tiny dilutions accompanying each financing.

Note also that with every financing, the Silicon Valley echo chamber thought the investors were nuts to offer such rich valuations. It's now clear the echo chamber was wrong every time; the investors were quite savvy, as a matter of fact.

I don't know exact numbers, but I believe Facebook's equity sales to investors were roughly:

Sep 04 -- 10% sold for $500k. ($5mm valuation -- Peter Thiel, Angels)

May 05 -- 12.7% sold for $12.7mm. ($100mm valuation -- Accel)

Apr 06 -- 5% sold for $27.5mm. ($550mm valuation -- Greylock, Meritech, Founders Fund)

Oct 07 -- 1.6% sold for $240mm. ($15b valuation -- Microsoft)

Nov 07 thru Apr 08 -- 0.9% sold for $135mm ($15b valuation -- Li Ka-shing and European Founders Fund)

May 08 -- no dilution; took $100mm in venture debt from Triple Point Capital

May 09 -- 1.3% sold for $200mm. ($15b valuation -- Digital Sky Technologies)

Jun 10 -- 0.8% sold for $120mm (a blended $14b valuation -- Elevation)

Jan 11 -- 3% sold for $1.5b ($50b valuation -- thank you Goldman Sachs!)

Feb 11 -- 0.1% sold for $38mm ($52b valuation -- really, KPCB?!)


Alexia Tsotsis did an incredible job representing these financing rounds as a fantastic infographic: TechCrunch.com/2011/01/10/facebook-5/

The Next Web and Scobleizer have an excellent graphic of who owns Facebook as of 1/11/11, accounting for dilutions: TheNextWeb.com/facebook/2011/01/12/so-who-really-owns-facebook-chart/

The reasons for drastic up rounds of valuation each time were:

1) The unprecedented momentum of product's core metrics (users and usage).

2) The excellent advice and guidance from the beginning, first from Stephen Venuto and Sean Parker, then Peter Thiel and Reid Garrett Hoffman, then Matt Cohler and Jim Breyer, and at some point Marc Andreessen.

3) Enough revenues (mostly ads) to never have to raise a round with unfriendly terms. See Carlos Tobin's answer to How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

The unusual combination of tremendous product momentum and the right people involved created the ideal conditions for such tiny dilution.


One other factor: Zuck never had an equal co-founder like Larry and Sergey. Were that the case, both Zuck and co-Zuck would each own 13%, rendering them roughly the same as pre-IPO Google.

See also: What were the 4 or 5 key decisions that Mark Zuckerberg made in the early days of Facebook?

Is Mark Zuckerberg difficult to work with?

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Yishan Wong·

Worked at Facebook (company)No. There are plenty of people who are happy to work with him, though there are also plenty who find it difficult. He is not some sort of ideally charismatic person whose primary quality is that he's easy to get along with. Rather, he's a demanding CEO with a monomaniacal focus on making Facebook succeed in its mission. This is not to say that he's mean - he's a perfectly nice guy on a personal level; it's just that professionally, he is focused on getting it done, and has a limited tolerance for emotional fragility in the people he needs to help him execute on that mission. In my study of business leaders, I've yet to come across one who was considered "great" who didn't also have a significant body count of ex-employees claiming that they were autocratic and mean. Examples include Jac(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a good human being?

Anonymous

Personally, I don't think he's that great. I always think of random ideas and wonder "hmm should I mock something up and try to implement it?", but I never do cause I'm complacent with my daily routines. Couple years back I got really sick and took a leave from work, which left me with some availability in my day (when not complaining about my aching body). I was trying to complete something on Facebook and was having some difficulties sorting out the privacy permission settings and thought for something that was designed to be user friendly, it really isn't that friendly. Well, I had time to mock something up to potentially make Facebook user friendly. With over 30 hours of brainstorming and trying to convince my dog that his walk would be in 10 minutes, I had a eureka moment. I drafted.

Does Mark Zuckerberg have mild Asperger's?

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Blandine Mifsud·

17 years in a relationship with a self-harming partner

Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic?

NOTE: The original question was:”Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic” My answer was to that exact question and not to the merge and different: Is Mark Zuckerberg psychopathic”

Kahn compares psychopathy to autism, not because the two disorders are similar in their manifestation, but because they're both neurological disorders. There is an overlap between the symptoms of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders. Those two disorders require differential diagnosis:

[Differential diagnosis of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders in adults. Empathic deficit as a core symptom].


Hi Gabriela, I do not know for sure as I have not investigated him.

NOTE: It would take me more than one week to asses him (or anyone). I don’t even do proper assessment. I simply investigate genetics with dysmorphology. Focusing only on some specific personalities: the ones that I consider to be of specific interest regarding my current investigation. At the present time, Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t fit my criteria / doesn’t interest me. I‘ll certainly not investigate him unless Mark himself will contact me for that purpose. Secondly, considering that I’m an amateur detective and not a professional geneticist, obviously he will never made such request.

What I can say from few seconds checking pictures from Google is that Mark Zuckerberg seems to have few dysmorphic facial features.

He seems to have an asymmetric face. Asymmetric face indicates a problem on the midline, a rather symptomatic occurrence in male autistic patients. Patient with this cranial anomaly tend to have some others anomalies. Mark has an extremely mild orbital hypotelorism (an abnormally decreased distance between the eyes).

Autistic people have more anomalies related to their ears : Size, rotation, location….

Mark’s ears doesn’t seem to be on the same level: it could be a sign of sensory disorder, a condition comorbid in autism. Sensory disorder exists without autism.

Clinical research: Facial features can help diagnose autism | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Autistic people collect routines: routines in speech, routine in behaviors, routine in postures… Mark Z have limited facial expression, limited postures. I could not help to notice the way he holds his hands seems very repetitive. It’s difficult not to notice that he is not a fashion addict neither: his wardrobe is basically a grey tee shirt + jean or a dark costume with a white shirt..and a tie (of changing colors in hue ranging from grey to blue).

Autism is a spectrum. A wide spectrum. Most of those on the spectrum have special interest in which they will become real experts. It’s hard to deny Mark Zuckerberg is above fluent in computer. You need a special brain to master that technologie the way he masters it…

At the present time dysmorphology is not used as a diagnostic tool for autism. Before Mark could qualify as autistic he will have to fill each an every of the six Gillberg’s criteria for confirmation of diagnosis.

GILLBERG'S CRITERIA FOR ASPERGER'S DISORDER (SYNDROME)

  1. Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction
    (at least two of the following)
    (a) inability to interact with peers
    (b) lack of desire to interact with peers
    (c) lack of appreciation of social cues
    (d) socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior

2. All-absorbing narrow interest
(at least one of the following)
(a) exclusion of other activities
(b) repetitive adherence
(c) more rote than meaning

3. Imposition of routines and interests
(at least one of the following)
(a) on self, in aspects of life
(b) on others

4. Speech and language problems
(at least three of the following)
(a) delayed development
(b) superficially perfect expressive language
(c) formal, pedantic language
(d) odd prosody, peculiar voice characteristics
(e) impairment of comprehension including misinterpretations of literal/implied meanings

5. Non-verbal communication problems
(at least one of the following)
(a) limited use of gestures
(b) clumsy/gauche body language
(c) limited facial expression
(d) inappropriate expression
(e) peculiar, stiff gaze

6.Motor clumsiness: poor performance on neurodevelopmental examination

Considering that Mark did take a parternity leave following the birth of his daughter, he doesn’t seems to have inability to interact with peers or lack of desire to interact with peers. In order to qualify as autistic Marck will have to fill the criteria of Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction with either the lack of appreciation of social cues and to behave socially and emotionally inappropriate.By Gabriela Ela ela.

How good is Mark Zuckerberg's Chinese?

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Glenn Luk·

Expert in the ABC dialectOn a scale from Chris Tucker to Dashan, his accent is somewhere between John Cena and Jon Huntsman. Here is Mark speaking at Tsinghua University in October 2014: A year later, he gave another speech in Mandarin (Facebook Video) and he had clearly improved. And then for Chinese New Year 2016, he and his wife Priscilla uploaded a video: You can tell that his Chinese is getting better over time.

Honestly, in the New Year’s video it’s probably on the same level as his (Chinese-American) wife. If he has been keeping it up, it should be even better by now! P.S. I really have a lot of respect for Mark for putting himself out there and speaking Chinese in public even though it is not his native language. 加油 Mark! P.P.S. Accent can be(more)

How academically smart is Mark Zuckerberg? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

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Robert Scoble

Former Chief Strategy Officer at Infinite Retina (2019–2020)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg, academic-wise? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

I've spent time with both several times. I find Bill Gates is just an amazing intellect, and I don't think it's fair to compare ANYONE to him. Zuckerberg is also an amazing intellect, but it's different and we haven't had as many opportunities to study him the way we have had with Gates.

Bill Gates has a photographic memory. One time he said something on stage word-for-word that I had told him six months prior. Many people I know have these experiences with Bill. Every time I meet him I mostly listen. My intellect isn't even close to his. Zuckerberg, though, for some reason, feels a bit more approachable, but I attribute that to his age and the fact that he's building something I understand a bit more than I understood the internals of Windows.

Zuckerberg, too, is damn smart and in recent conversations with him I've come away thinking "he just is doing better thinking on social software than anyone else." Plus, in addition to his other academic qualifications, he studied Chinese for his recent trip. I was only able to learn a few words. I'm sure he did a lot better! :-) I don't remember Gates learning other languages (update: Gary Stein says that he and his wife are learning Chinese), although I'm sure he'd count basic and C++ as other languages.

On the other hand, Zuckerberg seems more comfortable in social settings, walking me right up to Jet Li and introducing us at a Time party. I met Gates at one party in the mid-90s and just had a tough time getting him to talk until we started talking about just-in-time compilers and then he went on for half an hour. At last year's TED in the hallways Bill did the same thing, but instead of talking compilers was talking about nuclear power.

Zuckerberg has impressed me similarly, but is still focused on building Facebook so isn't spending much time thinking about other things. Clearly, as the questioner showed, Zuckerberg is a smart dude too and picks things up VERY fast. I witnessed this when Zuckerberg met other CEOs and discussed the technologies they were using to build their companies.

So, to answer the question: Gates wins, but mostly because we've seen how he learns new topics for a longer time.

What would be interesting is to put the 26-year-old Gates next to the 26-year-old Zuckerberg and compare them. If we did that then Zuckerberg probably would win.

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What has Adam D'Angelo learned from Mark Zuckerberg?

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Chirag Shah

Former Software Developer at Barclays Investment Bank (company) (2018–2019)

I am not the right person to answer this, but I would like to have my say.

Adam D'Angelo - the former CTO of Facebook was a pure geek guy with amazing coding abilities in his early days, we can see this from his topcoder profile. dangelo Profile | TopCoder He was at top level, “red”.

On the other hand Zuckerberg's profile on the site is at the "green" level which isn’t as good as the one Angelo has. mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder

Having said that, Zuckerberg knew how to build projects, he knew how systems were built, how to bring the ideas into reality and how to indulge people by using the notion of ‘connectivity’.

This can be concluded from that fact that he developed a ‘course selection program’ and ‘facemash’ in his sophomore year at Harvard.

During a CS50 course, Mark had delivered a guest lecture regarding how he expanded and scaled facebook to a global level.

Here is his talk:

Mark was very confident in whatever he did, he had a sense of control in what he built. He had a clear vision and he always wanted to build his product for the people, he wanted people to be connected to each other.

These were the qualities which could have been observed by Adam.

Apart from his coding prowess, Adam could have learned how to build a company, how to scale the products and monetize them.

Also given the fact that whole idea of Mark was to connect people, Adam could have been inspired by this very whole idea of ‘how to connect people’ and hence he built this amazing ‘Quora’ where people were more connected by their questions and ideas, where they could share their views and opinions.

This is just my take on this subject. What Adam has learned can be answered by no one other than him.

Thanks.

Why is Mark Zuckerberg so hated?

Quy Tan

Knows VietnameseI think because of the following reasons: 1. He is a Jew. If you visit White Supremacist forums (I visit these harmful websites sometimes, just because of curiosity), they hate Jew and Israel deeply, and especially they hate the most famous, richest, most successful and most powerful Jew like Mark Zuckerberg. Oh don't worry, they hate everything. They hate Black, Chinese, and White Liberal as well. 2. He is accused of anti-conservative bias. He also got hated by Trump supporters. For example, he often fact-checks or even delete wrong claim or disinformation regarding Coronavirus by Trump or some Trump supporters. 3. Rumors and fake news: It is so ridiculous that New Tang Dynasty Vietnam claim that Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg are a “slave” of China, and work for China favor.

What are some interesting facts about Mark Zuckerberg?

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Bhanu Prasad

UI Developer at Virtusa (company)Here are a few facts about the facebook legend... 1) All Blue Facebook CEO is red-green colour blind, which means that the best colour he can see is blue. Zuckerberg reportedly once said, "Blue is the richest colour for me. I can see all of blue." No prizes for guessing why blue is the most dominant colour on the world's top social networking site. 2) Declined job offers from Microsoft, AOL While in high school, Zuckerberg co-developed a music app called Synapse Media Player. Tech giants Microsoft and AOL reportedly offered Zuckerberg a million dollars to further develop the app as well as wanted to hire him. Zuckerberg instead chose to join Harvard University. 3) Doesn't own a TV, calls himself atheist Born to Jewish parents, Zuckerberg considers himself an atheist.

How did Mark Zuckerberg become a programming prodigy?

David Roth

Former Digital SE at Amazon (company) (2011–2013)

how did Mark Zuckerberg train himself to be a programming prodigy?

This is a very interesting question to me because, as several responders have pointed out already, it's based on a flawed premise. Mark Zuckerberg is not the person that most coders would think of when they hear the term "programming prodigy".

I think the questioner equates fame, wealth, or success with being a prodigy. This is almost never the case in coding. Coders who are good will generally make a good living but they do not, as a rule, become CEOs.

When I think of a programming prodigy, the first person who comes to mind is Paul Allen, because of the anecdote about writing the loader for Microsoft Basic for the Altair computer while flying to Albuquerque. Note that this was in 1975; there weren't laptops that you could take on a plane then. Allen was writing machine code on a piece of paper with a pencil, and he created a loader program that worked. That's pretty amazing. Altair BASIC

Another prodigy would be Margaret Hamilton. She wrote the code for the Apollo space program. The sheer scope of that project and the hardware limitations she was dealing with are staggering. She had finished this code by the time she was 31. Margaret Hamilton (scientist)

As for the "how did x train themselves to become a prodigy" part of the question, you don't really train to become a prodigy. A prodigy is someone who is exceptionally good at what they do; there is an implication in term that the person is naturally gifted. A prodigy has a natural interest in their chosen art and they're good at it, so they enjoy practicing it and studying it. "Training to become a prodigy" is kind of like "training to become lucky"; it's a nonsensical proposition.

How self-disciplined is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Arjun Singh

Content Creator at BackNo (2018–present)Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg is very sensitive Entrepreneur in the world. I have noticed many things when I read the blog, books and watched videos. so all I want to share on Quora platform. * Only Only Eats What I Kills: * * Zuckerberg's view on nutrition ethics is similar to some types of Buddhist vegetarianism and Locavorism. And as he himself admitted, it's "basically" a vegetarian diet. However, the fact that Zuckerberg did kill some animals himself — according to Fortune, this includes a lobster, chicken, pig and a goat — to eat them will surely stir some controversy. Zuckerberg even posted a message on his private Facebook page on May 4 saying, "I just killed a pig and a goat." * Set annual goals: * * Despite his claim of laser-focus, Zuckerberg has always had interests beyond social media.

How does Mark Zuckerberg manage his time?

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Pascal Lorig

Lives in GermanyThe key is outsourcing. No matter if Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, all of them have personal assistants and a crew around them. Their business basically is running itself. Their job is showing the course. That is why they do meetings all the time. Private time does not require much management, because there is very little. Steve Jobs for instance took his spare time for having dinner with the whole family. Once a year he made time for holidays. Mark Zuckerberg himself said that you get what you spend the most time on. So he eliminates all distractions. For instance his clothing is always the same. He is also known for sleeping less than usual people. So that gives him extra time. People like Mark Zuckerberg also have to prioritise. There are times when they have to choose.

How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email? How many hundreds or thousands of emails do they receive daily, and how do they manage them? Do they have an assistant that filters all the important stuff?

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Tim Williams

Originally Answered: How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email?

It's all about the content of the email that determines how it would be handled.

They are humans, they get notifications of new mail, and assuming they're near their device, they will see it firsthand like the rest of us.

Here are some possibilities for handling:

  • Direct communication with other leaders of the company, employees, relevant partner companies, important service providers, and of course financial/banking matters. I'd also assume even government and other national and international matters.
  • Basic filters for newsletters, list emails from companies/competitors they're interested in, and other subject matters they follow.
  • Pre-written personal responses for some frequent inquiries: Can you attend my conference, talk to me on the phone about my project, mentor me, or some other general ask that... if they weren't so highly desired, they would be likely to want to listen to you. These are replies they can copy/paste from drafts, Evernote, or whatever tool of choice.
  • Forward to the appropriate person. Often times, emails are sent to these figures misguidedly. There are plenty of people who work for them who are far more suited to reply, so for a basic example, a legitimate email for some real business development opportunity - would be forwarded without a personal response to the appropriate person.
  • Personal Assistant(s). For things like scheduling meetings, phone calls, events, and other things that said recipient wants to actually take part in, they are unlikely to coordinate the logistics personally. This is where they may confirm something by email and then pass off to a PA to handle the details. A PA may also convert verbal responses into email responses for convenience and speed.
  • Multiple email addresses. I am less sure of this one, but I'd guess that they have an email address that's easy enough to guess that they do monitor (first.last@whatever.com) that follows the above protocol that receives a bulk of it. Then, they probably have a secondary company email that is strictly private or even perhaps limited to company and authorized sender list only for what I'll call "daily biz". And of course lastly, one or more personal email addresses to communicate with family and others.

In summary, it's all about what the content of the email is and that will determine any number of filters as to how it's handled.

What are some of Mark Zuckerberg's mistakes at Facebook?

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Eric Benjamin Seufert

Author of Freemium Economics, Owner of Mobile Dev MemoFacebook waited too long to transition to mobile (Facebook only launched its native iOS app in August 2012! Facebook Launches Native App for iPhone and iPad, Rebuilt From Ground Up) and as a result wasn't able to capture the mobile advertising market in near entirety, which it almost certainly would have had it focused on mobile (and, subsequently, mobile advertising) sooner. Had Facebook acted faster, it probably could have preempted the creation of the affiliate / syndication networks that proliferated on mobile beginning in around 2012 and added tens of billions of dollars to its enterprise value at exactly the point when many public investors became skittish about its future prospects (Facebook Stock Sinks Below $30 -- How Much Farther Will it Drop?). That said, Facebook's transition

Should Mark Zuckerberg slowly phase advertising out of Facebook's ecosystem?

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Mark Rogowsky

Forbes technology, raconteur, @maxrogoBy all means. I mean, it's currently only about 90% of Facebook's revenue. And that revenue is only going to be about $5 billion this year. And it was zero just a few years ago. So, I mean clearly this whole advertising thing isn't working out for Facebook. Also, the company only has something like a billion users and only half of them log on daily. And when it rolled out its newest ad product, Sponsored Stories, it only found that was worth about $1 million per day. To make matters worse, only half that revenue was coming from mobile -- and lots of people use Facebook on mobile. Finally, it's crystal clear that for Facebook to exploit new monetization schemes it has to stop making money from advertising because clearly those are mutually exclusive. There is obviously no way to begin chargi(more)

Between Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, who is more selfish? Why?

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Sean Chou·Updated August 28, 2018Business Intelligence Consultant & small business owner;ENTJUndoubtedly Mark Zuckerberg is more selfish. Zuckerberg’s professional motto has always been “connecting the world” through Facebook, which any self-respecting person can see serves his own purposes. Facebook now touts half or nearly half the world's population as users, and it continues to grow. Not so long ago, Zuckerberg wished to be the face of modern colonialism by “gifting” large portions of India with free wifi internet access, albeit tethered permanently to his own Facebook platform. India refused it unsurprisingly, and Zuckerberg jested that India didn't want to “step into the future.” Nevertheless, he did not pursue giving India free internet without also shoving Facebook down their throats. Another case in point: Zuckerberg has pledged with so many other billionaires to give away(more)

How can I get in touch with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Joe Tannorella

Founder at UIDB.io (2016–present)When I wanted to contact an equally famous person - Sir Richard Branson - I made this: Dear Sir Richard Branson It took 2 weeks of pure hustle, including: * Calling all of his company receptions (Virgin Group reception were especially receptive) * Asking everyone in my network * Trying to reach his family members and their respective companies: son, daughter * Messaging all of his company CEOs via email and LinkedIn Premium * Commenting on his social media posts * Facebook advertising. Targeted him, his family, and more * Calling the BBC when I found out that SRB was live on their show that evening * Twitter advertising * …A hell of a lot more… You have to really want it. And you have to give him a reason to want to read what you’re telling him. Good luck!

Who is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Mayank Sharma

HR at Teleperformance Indore (2019–present)

Who is Mark Zukerburg?

Mark Zuckerberg ( Chief Executive Officer of Facebook )

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is an American technology entrepreneur and philanthropist. Zuckerberg is known for co-founding and leading Facebook as its chairman and chief executive officer. He also co-founded and is a board member of the solar sail spacecraft development project Breakthrough Starshot

Who Is Mark Zuckerberg?

Born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, Mark Zuckerberg co-founded the social-networking website Facebook out of his college dorm room.

He left Harvard after his sophomore year to concentrate on the site, the user base of which has grown to more than 2 billion people, making Zuckerberg a billionaire many times over. The birth of Facebook was portrayed in the 2010 film The Social Network.

Early Life

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg was born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, into a comfortable, well-educated family, and raised in the nearby village of Dobbs Ferry.

His father, Edward Zuckerberg, ran a dental practice attached to the family's home. His mother, Karen, worked as a psychiatrist before the birth of the couple's four children—Mark, Randi, Donna and Arielle.

Zuckerberg developed an interest in computers at an early age; when he was about 12, he used Atari BASIC to create a messaging program he named "Zucknet." His father used the program in his dental office, so that the receptionist could inform him of a new patient without yelling across the room. The family also used Zucknet to communicate within the house.

Together with his friends, he also created computer games just for fun. "I had a bunch of friends who were artists," he said. "They'd come over, draw stuff, and I'd build a game out of it."

Education

To keep up with Mark's burgeoning interest in computers, his parents hired private computer tutor David Newman to come to the house once a week and work with Mark. Newman later told reporters that it was hard to stay ahead of the prodigy, who began taking graduate courses at nearby Mercy College around this same time.

Zuckerberg later studied at Phillips Exeter Academy, an exclusive preparatory school in New Hampshire. There he showed talent in fencing, becoming the captain of the school's team. He also excelled in literature, earning a diploma in classics.

Yet Zuckerberg remained fascinated by computers, and continued to work on developing new programs. While still in high school, he created an early version of the music software Pandora, which he called Synapse.

Several companies—including AOL and Microsoft—expressed an interest in buying the software, and hiring the teenager before graduation. He declined the offers.

Zuckerberg at Harvard

After graduating from Exeter in 2002, Zuckerberg enrolled at Harvard University. By his sophomore year at the Ivy League institution, he had developed a reputation as the go-to software developer on campus. It was at that time that he built a program called CourseMatch, which helped students choose their classes based on the course selections of other users.

He also invented Facemash, which compared the pictures of two students on campus and allowed users to vote on which one was more attractive. The program became wildly popular, but was later shut down by the school administration after it was deemed inappropriate.

Based on the buzz of his previous projects, three of his fellow students—Divya Narendra, and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss—sought him out to work on an idea for a social networking site they called Harvard Connection. This site was designed to use information from Harvard's student networks in order to create a dating site for the Harvard elite.

Zuckerberg agreed to help with the project, but soon dropped out to work on his own social networking site with friends Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes and Eduardo Saverin.

Zuckerberg and his friends created a site that allowed users to create their own profiles, upload photos, and communicate with other users. The group ran the site—first called The Facebook—out of a dorm room at Harvard until June 2004.

After his sophomore year, Zuckerberg dropped out of college to devote himself to Facebook full time, moving the company to Palo Alto, California. By the end of 2004, Facebook had 1 million users.

Facebook Rises

In 2005, Zuckerberg's enterprise received a huge boost from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. Accel invested $12.7 million into the network, which at the time was open only to Ivy League students.

Zuckerberg's company then granted access to other colleges, high school and international schools, pushing the site's membership to more than 5.5 million users by December 2005. The site then began attracting the interest of other companies, who wanted to advertise with the popular social hub.

Not wanting to sell out, Zuckerberg turned down offers from companies such as Yahoo! and MTV Networks. Instead, he focused on expanding the site, opening up his project to outside developers and adding more features.

Legal Hurdles

Zuckerberg seemed to be going nowhere but up. However, in 2006, the business mogul faced his first big hurdle: the creators of Harvard Connection claimed that Zuckerberg stole their idea, and insisted the software developer needed to pay for their business losses.

Zuckerberg maintained that the ideas were based on two very different types of social networks but, after lawyers searched Zuckerberg's records, incriminating instant messages revealed that Zuckerberg may have intentionally stolen the intellectual property of Harvard Connection and offered Facebook users' private information to his friends.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the incriminating messages, saying he regretted them. "If you're going to go on to build a service that is influential and that a lot of people rely on, then you need to be mature, right?" he said in an interview with The New Yorker. "I think I've grown and learned a lot."

Although an initial settlement of $65 million was reached between the two parties, the legal dispute over the matter continued well into 2011, after Narendra and the Winklevosses claimed they were misled in regards to the value of their stock.

'The Social Network'

Zuckerberg faced yet another personal challenge when the 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, by writer Ben Mezrich, hit stores. Mezrich was heavily criticized for his re-telling of Zuckerberg's story, which used invented scenes, re-imagined dialogue and fictional characters.

Regardless of how true-to-life the story was, Mezrich managed to sell the rights of the tale to screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the critically acclaimed film The Social Network received eight Academy Award nominations.

Zuckerberg objected strongly to the film's narrative, and later told a reporter at The New Yorker that many of the details in the film were inaccurate. For example, Zuckerberg had been dating longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan, a Chinese-American medical student he met at Harvard, since 2003. He also said he never had interest in joining any of the final clubs.

"It's interesting what stuff they focused on getting right; like, every single shirt and fleece that I had in that movie is actually a shirt or fleece that I own," Zuckerberg told a reporter at a startup conference in 2010. "So there's all this stuff that they got wrong and a bunch of random details that they got right."

Yet Zuckerberg and Facebook continued to succeed, in spite of the criticism. Time magazine named him Person of the Year in 2010, and Vanity Fair placed him at the top of their New Establishment list.

Net Worth

Forbes ranked Zuckerberg at No. 35—beating out Apple CEO Steve Jobs—on its "400" list, estimating his net worth to be $6.9 billion at the time.

Philanthropic Causes

Since amassing his sizeable fortune, Zuckerberg has used his millions to fund a variety of philanthropic causes. The most notable examples came in 2010: In September of that year, he donated $100 million to save the failing Newark Public Schools system in New Jersey.

Then, in December 2010, Zuckerberg signed the "Giving Pledge", promising to donate at least 50 percent of his wealth to charity over the course of his lifetime. Other Giving Pledge members include Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and George Lucas. After his donation, Zuckerberg called on other young, wealthy entrepreneurs to follow suit.

"With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts," he said.

Facebook IPO

Zuckerberg made two major life changes in May 2012: Facebook had its initial public offering, which raised $16 billion, making it the biggest Internet IPO in history.

After the initial success of the IPO, the Facebook stock price dropped somewhat in the early days of trading, though Zuckerberg is expected to weather any ups and downs in his company's market performance.

Wife

Also in May 2012—one day after the IPO—Zuckerberg wed his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan. About 100 people gathered at the couple's Palo Alto, California home.

The guests thought they were there to celebrate Chan's graduation from medical school, but instead they witnessed Zuckerberg and Chan exchange vows.

One year later, Facebook made the Fortune 500 list for the first time—making Zuckerberg, at the age of 28, the youngest CEO on the list.

Daughter

In November 2015, Zuckerberg and Chan welcomed a daughter, Max, and Zuckerberg announced he would be taking two months of paternity leave to spend with his family. He and his wife also pledged in an open letter to their daughter that they would give 99 percent of their Facebook shares to charity.

"We are committed to doing our small part to help create this world for all children," the couple wrote in the open letter that was posted on Zuckerberg's Facebook page. "We will give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives to join many others in improving this world for the next generation."

In September 2016, Zuckerberg and Chan announced that the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), the company into which they put their Facebook shares, would invest at least $3 billion into scientific research over the next decade to help “cure, prevent and manage all diseases in our children's lifetime." Renowned neuroscientist Cori Bargmann of The Rockefeller University, was named the president of science at CZI.

They also announced the founding of Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a San Francisco-based independent research center that will bring together engineers, computer scientists, biologists, chemists and others in the scientific community. A partnership between Stanford University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley, Biohub will receive initial funding of $600 million over 10 years.

In March 2017, Zuckerberg and Chan announced on Facebook that they were expecting their second child. Daughter August was born on August 28.

The CEO has undertaken a personal challenge at the start of every year since 2009, with previous efforts including learning to speak Mandarin and only eating meat he had killed himself.

Fake News and Cambridge Analytica Scandal

After enduring criticism for the proliferation of fake news posts on his site leading up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg in early 2018 announced his personal challenge to develop improved methods for defending Facebook users from abuse and interference by nation-states.

"We won't prevent all mistakes or abuse, but we currently make too many errors enforcing our policies and preventing misuse of our tools," he wrote on his Facebook page. "If we're successful this year then we'll end 2018 on a much better trajectory."

However, Zuckerberg came under fire again a few months later when it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, had used private information from approximately 87 million Facebook profiles without the social network alerting its owners. The resulting outcry seemed to shake investors' confidence in Facebook, its shares dropping by 15 percent after the news became public.

Following a few days' silence, Zuckerberg surfaced on various outlets to explain how the company was taking steps to limit third-party developers' access to user information, and said he would be happy to testify before Congress. On Sunday, March 25, Facebook took out full-page ads in seven British and three American newspapers, penned in the form of a personal apology from Zuckerberg. He promised the company would investigate all of its apps, and remind users which ones they can shut off. "I’m sorry we didn’t do more at the time," he wrote. "I promise to do better for you."

Amid increasing calls for his resignation from investor groups, Zuckerberg traveled to Capitol Hill and met with lawmakers ahead of his two-day testimony, scheduled for April 10 and 11. The first day of hearings, with the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees, was considered a tame affair, with some senators seemingly struggling to understand the business model that powered the social media giant.

The follow-up hearing before House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee proved far testier, as its members grilled the Facebook CEO over privacy concerns. During the day's testimony, Zuckerberg revealed that his personal information was among the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica, and suggested that legal regulation of Facebook and other social media companies was "inevitable."

The negative PR seemingly did little to slow the company's progress, as Facebook rebounded to see its stock close at a record $203.23 on July 6. The surge bumped Zuckerberg past Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett to become the world's third-richest person, behind fellow tech titans Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates.

However, the gains were wiped out when Facebook shares dropped a staggering 19 percent on July 26, following an earnings report that revealed a failure to meet revenue expectations and slowing user growth, erasing nearly $16 billion of Zuckerberg's personal fortune in one day.

Info Source - Mark Zuckerberg

How did Mark Zuckerberg propose to Priscilla Chan?

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Dhaval Mehta

Studied Computer Science

heres the answer...

The Love Story of Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan

How is Mark Zuckerberg rich?

Divya Dave

Mark Zukerberg and Elon Musk!Well answer is because of us! Yes its true.There us no doubt that Facebook is one of the largest social network with billions of users! And still there is no doubt that Facebook founder MARK ZUKERBERG is considered as one of the billionaire in the world. But how? Advertising When users log in and share their information like interests or share their info on the site Mark there itself start earning the money your 1 Like on the advertisements on the Margins of the Facebook Mark charges the fees from the advertisers so basically we are the markers of him! Smart move isn't it? Facebook has tied up with more than 50 companies and startups! Most of them are most popularly used apps and startups. Like Instagram ,WhatsApp and many more. He believe to join all the great founders together!

How did Mark Zuckerberg manage to own 25% of Facebook?

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Patrick Mathieson

Venture investor @ Toba CapitalGenerally speaking, these are the levers you can pull to minimize dilution during fundraising: * Don't raise a ton of money. * Negotiate a high valuation. * Wait until you can negotiate a high valuation to raise a ton of money (this is just restating the first two points). Let's see how this played out for Facebook using data that was helpfully organized by Dealbook: * Angel round (2004): $500k raised at a ~$5M cap, so +/- 10% dilution in exchange for sufficient funds to really begin developing & growing the platform. The team saves money by living/working together in a house in Palo Alto, taking pretty low or nonexistent salaries, et cetera. Good move. * Series A (2005): $12.7M raised at a ~$80M valuation, which is ~15% dilution. At this point the userbase was growing so briskly that valuation jumpe.

How many hours a week does Mark Zuckerberg actually work at the Facebook office?

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Lee Byron·Updated May 19, 2014Worked at Facebook (company) (2008–2018)Originally Answered: Mark Zuckerberg, how many hours a week do you actually work at the Facebook office?

I sit near Mark at FBHQ so I'll speak from my experience.

He often arrives every morning before I do and is around after dinner working as well. I would say he is in the office roughly 9-10 hours a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes we have particularly exciting projects going on that have people volunteering their weekends and Mark might come by and see how things are going.

Mark occasionally travels and isn't in the office, but it seems like it's more likely that his appointments come to our headquarters than vice versa.

I should say that it's great to have him around with regularity and that he chooses to have the same desk set up as everyone else. He takes his job very seriously not just as a businessman but as a leader; he has helped keep our company culture what it is.

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What is it like to code with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Saket Pundlik

forever oldComing from a person with a non-coding background, it must be like: * Playing chess with Gary Kasparov * Acting with Marlon Brando * Singing with Frddie Mercury * Playing guitar with Jimi Hendrix * And most importantly, arguing with Sheldon Cooper First you will feel honoured, then you will be humbled.

What kind of car does Mark Zuckerberg drive?

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Jason McHenry·

Lives in Los Altos, CA

He is known to have a few but his daily driver is a black Volkswagen Golf MK6 GTI. He really ‘likes’ having dinner at Sumika in Los Altos and I see him ‘check in’ there kind of often.

And since he thinks it’s okay to play fast and loose with people’s private information I wonder how he’d feel if people were to, say, share a photo of his license plates or something? That’d probably not be very cool.

What are Mark Zuckerberg's strengths?

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Mohammed Raiyyan

looking for facebook internshipGreetings..!! Okay lets hop into the answer Zuck is likable & very friendly: Great posture in both the physical and philanthropic senses. Very intelligent yet seems down-to-earth and humble. Lacks at classic professionalism in day-to-day dressing but makes up for that with attitude and clean, neat clothing as well as good posture. Did I mention great posture? :) 1. He has a vision His vision was that of a more open and connected world. And throughout the growth of Facebook, he has stuck to his vision - that of a product that offers value while connecting people and building a world with more empathy. From the beginning, the frugal-living Zuckerberg was never in it for the money> He had a larger vision and not only thought ahead of where he wanted to take Facebook, but pushed himself and his te(more)

What is Mark Zuckerberg like in person?

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Marc Alessandro IV

Started an online business at 14 sold it 6 years later for an undisclosed amountJust like any other person. He doesn't talk about his wealth; money, cars, what have you. He's really down to Earth. He also doesn't really talk about business. We usually talk about mundane things, or about programming. It's also worth mentioning that I meet Zuckerberg in 08' 09'. It was a different world, but he was still very humble So in the end, he's just like you or me. He's just worth billions of dollars. I almost forgot he does talk alot about the books he is currently reading.

What advice did Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz give Adam D'Angelo when he was leaving Facebook to start Quora?

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Manish Kumar Srivastav

Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India (2012–present)

Spread knowledge.

The immense contribution and change that Quora has brought is lowering the communication gap between pizzled and achievers. Your questions can be directly answered by prominent people. I feel that's immensely helpful to society.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg have a 99% approval rating from his employees?

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Amir Memon

Muslim, Software Engineer

Because he is just that awesome.

There are several reasons why we "approve" of him:

  • The story: He built this billion user and billion dollar company from his dorm room, overcame one obstacle after another, and assembled a company with some of the most talented employees in the world.
  • The principles: He is dead-focused on "making the world more open and connected." The guy doesn't waver; all the investments in R&D and acquisitions have been along these lines.
  • The heart: He was the biggest donor of 2013, and is generally a minimalist. He is clearly committed to Internet.org, even though that's not necessarily where the short term revenue increases are. We really feel he wants to change the world for the better.
  • The guts: What other CEO has the... guts... to purchase a chat company for $19B??? It's a very smart purchase for various reasons, but still, $19B! Even other Silicon Valley CEOs acknowledge Zuck's fearlessness: http://read.bi/1n24ctW
  • The wisdom: When we hear him speak, he gives us brain wrinkles. He has this uncanny ability to make all the right strategic moves, and when he explains the reasons for making those moves, it simply makes sense. Sure, mistakes have been made, and hindsight is 20/20, but at decision time, it was for all the right reasons.
  • The trust: He doesn't make all the decisions, in fact far from it. We feel entrusted and empowered to drive our features the way we feel is best for the people that use Facebook. This is drastically different from many top-down corporations. We're happy with the balance between management-mandated and grass-roots-inspired decision making.
  • The character: He wears T-Shirts and jeans, talks with humility, and he just seems generally very approachable. We like that.
  • The business: Facebook is a rock solid business that is rapidly increasing in revenue as we speak. It makes more than 70% more in revenue than it was making just one year ago.
  • The free food and perks: Yes, this makes us like him and the company too. He has the ability to put an end to it at any time, but he keeps it coming :-). If somebody gives me free cookies, I like them, this part is not rocket science.


And, no, having a lower approval rating is not a good thing. People don't "approve" because they agree with everything, rather they know that they have a say, and that their opinion matters. It's a good thing to like your boss.

What are some of the evil aspects of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Vlad Usatii

Created readproduct.com to help users connect and share.

Mark Zuckerberg is an amazing entrepreneur.

But there is a point that all entrepreneurs get to where their attitude gets in the way of innovation. Mark is one of the few CEOs who doesn’t care about other brands. He wants his brand to succeed, but no one else's.

He isn’t moral — this is evident in how he views the world, crushing competition with simply upping ad pricing and upping gig posts on international job boards. If a brand is getting in the way with Facebook, he will straight up buy the business and never look back.

If someone will crush innovation and expansion, it may as well be the guy that doesn’t allow others to compete or innovate alongside him.

If we look at Zuck’s upbringing, he wanted to be a psychologist. This meant that, growing up, Mark had his own view on morality and even created websites to showcase the human psyche and its drawbacks. He stole a revolutionary idea from the one guy who dreamed it all up, made its premise into his own, and even told reporters something along the lines of: ‘I simply used the idea and made it better, as it was heading nowhere in the hands of the former.’

Zuck was a nerd, and with most nerds, there may be a root problem at hand. It could be that they don’t believe their knowledge tree is good enough, that their knowledge may be halted by the immediate realization that they aren’t the best, or it could simply be an inferiority complex, held down by the heightened social standing that stands as a proxy before their actions. Zuck created more and more and never looked at his haters or competition; he stomped competition with unethical, but ‘legal’ behavior, and created a storm of confusion among the crowd.

Some hate him for the fact that he looks like a psychopath (and nothing else to back the claim), but they may implicitly — instinctually — feel some sort of distrust in him because they deserve to think so.

After all, instinct has brought us this far.

Maybe Zuck will change, but his businesses will never stop behaving this way — the community has already been shaped.

What were the highlights of Mark Zuckerberg's testimony to Congress?

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Liam Ryan

Studied Master MarinerThe Highlights! – Well there were quite a few. I think seeing the equivalent of a linguistic gymnastics routine that finished with a big “Fuck You” “Shit Happens” and “Get over It” was probably the winner. Now I must confess this is not something I would usually take an interest in, nor would I usually watch but I wondered if Mr. Zuckerberg was going to try and explain what happened and the reasons why or just issue hollow meaningless words that looked to all appearances to have the veneer of an apology with no admissions of any wrong doing, which, is exactly what we got. Mr. Zuckerberg was able to emotionally frame his words in terms of a lack of action by saying “But it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough” What a nice linguistic trick to cover-up of the theft of our personal data by Camb(more)

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Mark Zuckerberg

How much is the per-day income of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Jeff Wilsbacher

Bay Area Native and lifelong residentAs a founder, he doesn’t trade time for money like most folks. Instead, he gets “a piece of the action” and gets to arbitrage other people's work and other people’s money. He makes money by buying low (people time/work) and selling high (advertizing/attention), and by organizing that work and sales. His net worth is around 70 billion. Today (2019, November 11) He was born 12,959 days ago. So, every day that he’s been alive he’s “made” around $5,401,651.36 every day (on average) since being born. But that’s pretty deceptive since he could have not started Facebook and gone on to do non-arbitrage work like most of us. He started Facebook 2004, February 4 (5,754 days ago). Using that start date he’s made around $12,165,450.12 a day. But that too might be deceptive since Facebook went public on 20(more)

How much of Facebook does Mark Zuckerberg own?

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Nat Burgess

Lives in Seattle, WA

In this matter, control is more interesting that dollars. Facebook structured its public offering so that Mark Zuckerberg retained over 50% of the voting shares in the company. The result is that Zuckerberg owns a minority of the fully diluted total shares outstanding, but a majority of the voting shares. Investors are skeptical of this type of arrangement because increases their risk. As shareholders they take financial risk on the value of the shares, but do not have an opportunity to participate in governance. For an individual investor this might not be a meaningful issue, but for large institutions that rely on active (and sometimes hostile) investors to force companies to take action, this is a high-risk scenario. Facebook was considered valuable enough that investors were willing to take the risk at the point of the IPO. Facebook has outperformed the market, and has not been targeted by activist investors.

Facebook listed Class A shares in their IPO. As of June 30, 2020, 2.879 billion Class A shares traded on NASDAQ. Class A shares have one vote per share. Class B shares, which are not traded on any public exchange, have 10 votes per share. Mark Zuckerberg owns approximately 57.9% of the Class B shares. Another approximately 12.5% are held by close friends and allies.

Zuckerberg owns just over 400 million shares total, valued on Friday 9/11/20 at approximately $105 billion.4.2K viewsView 4 upvotes ·

What programming languages does Mark Zuckerberg know?

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Douglas Green

Works at Gleim PublicationsAccording to what appears to be his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder), he is a third-level C++ programmer. I also found an interesting source FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002 where his areas of expertise were apparently listed on his RentACoder profile as "Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C++, Java, Javascript, and ASP". Presumable he also knows PHP/Hack from working at Facebook. I didn't find any mention of him knowing Python, though.

How does Mark Zuckerberg earn money through WhatsApp, as it is free and doesn’t even have ads?

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Moez Chandani·May 2, 2017Management Consultant. I enjoy studying businesses.

He doesn't. At least not right now.

Whatsapp currently has no revenue source. It originally began with a subscription based model where users were charged $0.99 a year to use the service. However, that's not a sustainable business model. Most of its 1.2 billion users (especially in developing nations) won't pay this amount, and Whatsapp would risk being overtaken by competitors who might offer similar services for free. This business model was therefore ditched.

Further, Whatsapp has traditionally been very very serious about maintaining customer privacy. One of its founders (and the current CEO of Whatsapp) Jan Koum grew up in USSR in the 80's where the government monitored nearly every action of its citizens, and this experience led him to take privacy seriously.[1] Whatsapp doesn't store chats on its servers, and all chats are end-to-end encrypted. They do not sell information about users to third party advertisers and in all probability will not do so in the near future.

However, Facebook will monetize Whatsapp in some form in the future (after all it's paid $19 billion for the app). Whatsapp can borrow a few ideas from Tencent which is hugely successful & highly profitable in China. Here are some possible avenues:

a) Incorporate mobile payments: This is probably going to happen in the near future. There was a flurry of news last month that Whatsapp may incorporate a UPI based payment system in India[2] . Basically, imagine PayTM and Whatsapp being integrated into a single app. You can settle bills with your friends, pay for your Uber rides, and pay at restaurants using your Whatsapp account. Whatsapp would earn money via transaction charges which would be levied on businesses WeChat has a similar service called WePay which is quite popular.

b) Use it for customer support: Whatsapp could also serve as a customer support tool. This is also something that should happen in the near future. Facebook has stated that they would

…test tools that allow you to use Whatsapp to communicate with businesses and organizations that you want to hear from.That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight.

Nearly every app today has a chat based support system integrated in it. Imagine replacing all of these with a Whatsapp based customer support system where you can contact companies directly from Whatsapp. It would simplify the process significantly. It would also be more efficient than tagging companies in tweets and posting on their Facebook pages to get attention.

c) Use it as a business tool: Another possible use here would be targeted messaging. Businesses could send targeted advertising messages to users who have specifically allowed these businesses to contact them. This could act as a replacement to sending emails or app notifications to users. So Zomato could offer special discounts to users who have enabled this service by sending them a Whatsapp message or by using the recently added Status tab on the app. Or MakeMyTrip could inform users about its latest offers via a Whatsapp Status.

d) Mobile gaming : WeChat in China earns most of its revenue from games incorporated in the app. While I am personally skeptical about how successful mobile games in apps would be in other countries, it can certainly be an option worth exploring.

In summary, while Whatsapp earns limited to no revenue currently, there is enough scope in the app to generate revenues via value added services.

Footnotes[1] Setting the record straight[2] WhatsApp will reportedly launch peer-to-peer payments in India within 6 months8.3K viewsView 25 upvotes25What was Mark Zuckerberg like in high school?

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Lee Zhen Fung

Came to write, stayed to work

Just your every day geek. But he was quite engrossed in coding and even at one point had a tutor to teach him.

However, before you go and start learning to code, note that coding today and yesterday were both very different. He programmed the first FB prototype in months. Every programmer has his own set of code directives or designs,just as every carpenter has his tools. Presently we have lots of languages like coffeescript, python and ruby which might produce a similar Facebook clone faster.

I think Facebook now has its own language, considering the many data logistical challenges it faces, which might not be easily overcome by conventional code languages.12.4K viewsView 14 upvotes ·

When Mark Zuckerberg first began building Facebook, what were his strengths and weaknesses as a developer?

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Andy Vraun

I have read extensively about Facebook although I haven't worked at FB .

Strengths

1.Product driven approach : When start-ups start getting noticed there is significant pressure from the investors to get a revenue model and for FB, it was surely advertising. But Zuckerberg was adamant that he needs to build a cool product above anything else and so revenue wasn't any of his focus.

2.Fantastic Web Programming skills: He had already built a few successful products on the web and had a good knowledge of both system programming (logs....etc) and web.

3. Belief in his Idea: He faced a huge backlash from the users who felt uncomfortable with the news feed. But Zuckerberg was adamant on not rolling it back, he felt it was basic to what FB really was and then now, it is in facebook's core.

Weaknesses

1. Poor communication Skills: If you are a developer or anything else poor communication is always bad. His handling of internal matters was poor.

2. Rigidity in his beliefs (Rude): FB had their employees wear cool jeans (Think for a 40 year old man) to make FB appear as a cool place. He insulted some investors which , to a guy of his exposure was unprofessional.

How did Mark Zuckerberg learn to run a 200 billion dollar company?

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Richard Garand

Studying reality to prepare for the testOriginally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg learn how to run a 200 billion dollar company?

There is no set of skills that guarantees you can run any large company (sorry, MBAs!).

The foundation is understanding what is important in that business. Mark Zuckerberg probably can't run Procter & Gamble or an airline because their priorities are very different and not what he is good at.

What makes him good at understanding Facebook's priorities? Probably a combination of:

  • His natural interests aligned with what ended up being important in Facebook
  • His experience testing other ideas prior to starting Facebook, and then running Facebook, showed him what users value and how they react
  • Facebook's dominance means the market is defined by its priorities to some degree, further making his ideas more valuable

Having that foundation, and spending a lot of time translating it into action, typically means that you will be among the most influential people in whatever position you choose to work (employee, speaker, author, entrepreneur, consultant, or anything else).

However that's not enough. It might work if you're on your own or running a 10-person company. To run a $200 billion company is far more challenging and requires some additional skills to support the points above (in theory, this is what an MBA is about).

At that size you will face pretty much every challenge imaginable except those not applicable to your company / industry -- for example Facebook's latest quarterly report shows that they aren't feeling the effects of an economic slowdown because of their constant growth, so they don't have to manage business cycles yet.

Although many people share some part of these challenges, the unique ones tend to involve leadership and influence. Internally the CEO has to make sure all the employees understand what they need to do without being able to talk to each of them. Externally the CEO has to represent the company with the image that supports it in different areas such as marketing, government policy, and recruitment.

On top of this the CEO has to avoid being isolated by their influence and power. It can actually be difficult to understand what's really going on with employees and customers when you get most of your information from people whose boss is a billionaire (and thus are more careful about what they say).

Every CEO of a large company had to learn these at some point. Mark Zuckerberg just put them into practice a little faster, and handled it very well.

There is only one way you can do that: with help from other people. This includes talking with CEOs in a similar position, having mentoring from investors or retired CEOs, and hiring people who are good at managing their area and making the most of it while contributing to the company's bigger goals.

It also takes a lot of personal skills since you will have to admit you are wrong often, manage your time effectively, and work well with many other people. Very good advisors and mentors can also help with these if you have a certain level of willingness to begin with.

Finally to put this all together it takes a very high level of drive. Although some of these things may seem to come naturally a lot of them will be difficult. Very few people are willing to put forth the level of effort over a long time that it takes to do this.6.2K viewsView 18 upvotes18

What time does Mark Zuckerberg go to bed?

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Sean Dean

Blogs about getting better sleep

Mark Zuckerberg famous sleeps very little and is a bit of a night owl. When he was programming about 10 years ago, he would keep 'programming hours' and stay up until 6 am or even 8am.

Mark Zuckerberg, photo taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zuckerberg

Now, he has to keep more orthodox business hours so has to get up earlier as you point out. It is reported he only sleeps for five hours a night, so that would mean if he now gets up at 5 am, he would go to bed at 12 am.

Source: Amazing – 10 Successful People Who Hardly Sleep

Check this out if you're interested in becoming an entrepreneur947.2K viewsView 713 upvotes71326

From where do Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg get their intelligence?

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Adam Pittenger

CEO of Moved (moved.com). Building, learning, writing.

It's difficult to say that their intelligence from X, Y, or Z. It's not so black and white.

First - It's important to note that intelligence comes in many forms. Some people might say "Book Smarts vs Street Smarts" but that barely scratches the surface.

For example, looking at the guys mentioned in the question, it is largely regarded that Mark Zuckerberg is a superior technical talent than Steve Jobs ever was. Jobs, however, was an incredible marketer and public speaker; something Zuck has had to work on over the years. So, while Jobs' level of social and emotional intelligence was probably much greater than Zuck's, Mark is more capable of working with his team to come up with the best technical solution for his product.

So... who is smarter? As you can see, the line is blurred.

All of this leads to saying that: the general term of "intelligence" here is probably better defined as the sum of their "strengths".

Each has their own strengths (and weaknesses, of course) that have made them successful entrepreneurs. This can be writing code, negotiating a deal, developing a strategy, etc.


Now that we've framed this, the real question is..
"How did their strengths become such strengths?"

  • CURIOSITY.
    These guys are hungry for knowledge. Hungry to better themselves and and learn as much as they can. Read, read, read... and read some more. You'll soak in so much and retain more than you realize. Doing so will lead to "lightbulb moments" later on, as your brain starts to make connections that others don't.
  • PRACTICE.
    Like any sport or craft, you get better with experience. So you have to just go out there and do it. The more you do it, the better you become. Were any of these guys great CEOs from Day 1? No. They may have qualities that made them okay, but I'm sure they were better CEOs after Year 1, Year 2, etc.
  • NETWORK.
    Lean on others. Generally, unless they suck, the people around you will want to help. You should continue to build your network with smart, experienced people that you can trust. (Make sure you're helping them as well!) This creates a healthy back-and-forth where, given your lack of knowledge or experience in a certain area, you can tap your network to get some help and guidance.


As mentioned above, my response here barely scratches the surface of the much larger topic of "intelligence". It's a topic I love to explore and am constantly fascinated with at a personal level.

Ultimately, if you want to be an entrepreneur - go be one. If you want to be like those guys - work your ass off and do it.

Never stop learning. Never stop improving.2.5K viewsView 10 upvotes · Answer requested by Jason Silvermann10

How intelligent is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Paul McDonnell

Director and Founder at AIGaming.com (2017–present)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg?

Mark Zuckerberg is ridiculously, pretty much off the charts smart.

  • Learnt programming at a very young age when this was much harder to do.
  • Even at this young age was applying programming to interesting problems for example when he created a network connecting his dad’s dental office to his home office.
  • Launched Facebook when so many smart people were trying to do something similar and made a success of it without previous comparable business experience.
  • Possibly the most outstanding: buying Instagram for a price which most at the time assumed to be ridiculously over priced but has turned out to be just the opposite:
  • Here’s why Facebook’s $1 billion Instagram acquisition was such a great deal
  • Continues to dominate the social media space after such a long time.

The breadth of skill this man has is what really gets me. He cannot be boxed into one category: there are many great software developers, but he is one whilst understanding user acquisition and retention like almost no one else.11.8K viewsView 17 upvotes171

Would you vote for Mark Zuckerberg if he ran for president?

What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg was born in India?

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Shubhi Agarwal

Voracious Reader and Super FoodieOriginally Answered: What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg were born in India?

Had Mark Zuckerburg been born in India, he would not have got into IITs, i guess. That's because just a very good interest and curiosity into computers or programming is definitely not a prerequisite to clear IITJEE. And what I have read about him, he would not have slogged for 2 years mugging up school and coaching curriculum for Phy, Cem and Math. So he would have been in a 2nd-3rd tier engineering college, or may have even taken a Humanities course.

Meanwhile he would have kept his curiosity getting the better of him, by learning from other sources on internet (having found his interest wavering to programming/hacking et al), and doing his self-study and experimentation. Probably, he would even have become an intern at a startup or an IT major. Given that, he would have developed on his computing skills on his own, he may even have got hired by the company.

Having partially learnt there by using their resources, and partially by his own mind, he would have created a similar (if not exactly same) prototype, and would have got support from his current employers to take it ahead. And in few years time (slower than the actual case), he would have slowly come into picture, with his own little startup.

India is full of such IT startups, where people started small, and slownly gained momentum. It would require longer than Harvard, but would not be an impossibility, given the guy's hunger to get something working for himself, by hook or by crook. :)

P.S. This is taking into picture the scenario, where Zuckerburg was born in an average middle class family and can afford a decent education.1.7K viewsView 4 upvotes42Is Mark Zuckerberg really a visionary?

Syed Usama Ahmed

Indian in CanadaOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg really that visionary?

Yes of course he is and any CEO would be to take his company to new heights and new platforms. He reveled his grand vision about For The Next 10 Years Of Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg said that next year Facebook would be making a series of aggressive talent and ad-tech investments that would set it up for a successful future.

But that could mean Facebook's expenses increase up to 70%.

Zuckerberg also outlined his three-, five-, and 10-year plan for the company.

In summary, he wants to have multiple Facebook products — WhatsApp, Messenger, Search, Video, NewsFeed, Oculus, and Instagram — each connect 1 billion users. Once those have reached mass scale, then he'll start to aggressively monetize them.

He also wants to improve the advertising experience for brands, particularly on mobile. Facebook will be investing in ways to better target and measure campaigns through data. It wants to help brands measure online to offline sales conversions. Currently, advertisers spend only about 11% of their budgets on mobile, according to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, because the right tools aren't in place.

Finally, Facebook wants to build the next major computing platform, which Zuckerberg believes could be augmented reality and Oculus. He also wants to bring the internet to more people through Internet.org.

"We're going to prepare for the future by investing aggressively," Zuckerberg said.

"The strength of the business today is putting us in a strong position to invest in the future," Wehner added.

Here's the transcript of Zuckerberg's plan, Seeking Alpha:

On previous calls, you’ve heard me talk about our big company goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms. These goals are important for us and part of our foundation of our strategy for the next decade, but achieving these will involve many different efforts and steps along the way, some that will be achieved rapidly and others that are going to take longer.

So with that in mind, I’d like to run through our progress this quarter on the different efforts that we expect to deliver a lot of impact over the next three, five and 10 years.

Let's begin with our three-year goals. Over the next three years, our main goals are around continuing to grow and serve our existing communities and businesses and help them reach their full potential.

When you look at the size and engagement of our community, our progress remains very strong. 864 million use Facebook every day and across our core products, we continue to see huge engagement. For example around 700 million people now use Facebook Groups every month. Achieving this scale shows that we're delivering experiences for the way that people want to share and connect.

Another example is our progress on public content. Last quarter I talked about how we're working to connect people around important public moments and personalities on Facebook. This quarter we've continued to build on our results and there are now more than 1 billion interactions every week between public figures and their fans on Facebook.

The investments we have made in video have also played a big part here. This quarter we announced a new milestone for video on Facebook achieving 1 billion video views, a day of made of videos. During the summers the ice bucket challenge drew more than 10 billion video views by 440 million people which is a good sign of how far our video product has come.

Instagram has also made a lot of progress this quarter. In August, the Instagram team launched Hyperlapse, a standalone app for time lapse of videos on iOS. The team has also invested heavily in improving the speed and performance of Instagram on Android. This has helped drive Instagram's strong international growth which in some countries has achieved more than 100% year-over-year growth. Globally, people using Instagram now spend around 21 minutes a day on average using the app. This is a strong figure compared to the industry and a good sign that Instagram's strategy is on the right path. Our other big focus over the next three years is to continue to serving businesses well and creating a lot of value for marketers.

As our results show, our approach here is working. To continue delivering value for businesses, we work to improve the quality of ads and news feed by reducing low quality content and improving our targeting to show more timely and relevant content. We’ve also made some big advances in our ad tech, most importantly the launch of our new Atlas platform. Atlas offers marketers a lot of new capabilities to help reach people across devices, platforms and publishers as well as improving measurement in online campaign. We're very excited for the future of Atlas and Cheryl is going to talk more about this in a moment.

Next, let's talk about our strategy over the next five years. Over the next five years, our goals are around taking our next generation of services, Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp and Search and helping them connect billions of people and become important businesses in their own right.

One big priority for us here is messaging. And continuing to build and grow Messenger and now WhatsApp as well as great services. This quarter we made an important change to our mobile messaging efforts by transitioning people to Messenger on iOS, Android and Windows Phone. We believe that this change allows us to offer a better and faster messaging experience on mobile, and our data shows that people who use Messenger, usually respond to messages about 20% faster.

This month we also completed our acquisition of WhatsApp. I'm excited to be working with this team and John to join our Board. WhatsApp continues to be on a path to connect more than 1 billion people around the world and we're going to be working into accelerate their efforts here. Another key part of our strategy is helping developers to build more great social experiences on our platform.

Over the next few years, our goal is to make Facebook a cross-platform platform that allows developers to build, grow and monetize their apps across every major mobile platform. We’ve continued to make good progress here. This quarter, we opened our audience networks to all developers and publishers, allowing over 1.5 million advertisers on Facebook to extend their campaigns across mobile and for developers to begin monetizing their apps.

We're also excited by the continued adoption of App Links, our deep-linking technology for mobile apps. App Links is now used by hundreds of apps across iOS, Android and Windows phone and in just the past six months, the developers have created links to more than 3 billion individual destinations in these apps.

Now let's talk about how we're approaching our goals over the next 10 years.For the next 10 years our focus is on driving the fundamental changes in the world that we need to achieve our mission, connecting the whole world, understanding a world with big leaps in AIs and developing the next generation of platforms, especially in computing.

This is a very big period, a very busy period for our efforts with Internet.org. In July we worked with Airtel to launch the Internet.org app in Zambia. This provides free data access to a set of basic internet services for health, education, employment and communication. The results from this are very encouraging. We've already heard a lot amazing stories about how people are using the internet to add value to their lives. We hope to bring Most Popular Websites & Email|Good Home Page|Top 500 Sites|The Internet.org app to many more countries soon.

Over the last few months, I've also travelled to several countries and met with policy makers, key distributors and people and communities that are coming online for the first time. Increasingly industry and governments are seeing expanding internet access as one of their core priorities. This is positive development for our work with Internet.org in our long-term goal of connecting everyone in the world.

Finally, let's talk for a minute about our progress of Oculus. As I've said before, with Oculus, we're making a long-term bet on the future of computing. Every 10 to 15 years, a new major computing platform arrives and we think that virtual and augmented reality are important parts of this upcoming next platform. This quarter, Oculus continued to make progress towards this vision.

In September, the first Oculus developer conference took place, where we announced a new prototype VR headset on the path of a consumer version of the Rift. We continue to see a lot of excitement in the developer community and we've now shipped more than 100,000 of Rift developer kit to over a 130 countries. It's still early for Oculus but we are encouraged to see the variety of apps and games being developed for this platform.

Internet.org and Oculus are just two of the huge opportunities ahead. Our efforts here will take longer to achieve their full impact, but we're going to continue preparing for the future by investing aggressively. So that’s how we’re approaching our strategy over the next three, five and 10 years, while focusing on our big goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms.

This has been a quarter with strong results. I want to thank the entire Facebook community, our employees, our partners and our stockholders for their continued support. Because of your contribution, Facebook continues to grow in strength and to create greater value in the world for people, partners and businesses. We have a long journey ahead, we’re on the right path and I'm excited about the progress that we’re making.

Originally Answered: Why hasn't Mark Zuckerberg answered any of the questions asked about him here on Quora?

OK I got this.
WHy do you think that mark zuckerberg is on Quora? Do you think is he here because he has no other work to do,or just for passing time or for increasing his credits? No,my dear friend,Mark is not in the need of any credits,he alerady has a multi-billlion dollar company. I'll tell you why he is here:
Just take a view at the questions asked by him.
He is here to know about how people are responding to facebook,which he can never,ever know on facebook. He can get free,cheap feedback here on quora which would be impossible and much expensive to implement on facebook. So why not use quora,where anxious people are dying to answer for free?
Plus he is here to know about his rival companies, microsoft,foursquare etc. In short,he is here just for a free for all survey for which there does not exist a better platform than this. Please have a look at the link i provided to the questions asked by him.2.9K viewsView 9 upvotesView shares91

Is Keiana Cavé the next Elon Musk/Mark Zuckerberg?

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Brian Farley

Molecular biologist turned biotech data scientist

This is what we’ve come to, friends. Because I’m not terribly interested in being sued for libel, I declare that everything contained in this answer expresses my personal opinion.

I mean no disrespect to Keiana, but the feel-good story of the young, brilliant, entrepreneurial “scientist” is a perennial, egregious failure of science “journalism”. Every year, it seems as though there’s yet another plucky high school senior who has invented and intends to sell a product that will change the world. The cesspool of reportage surrounding the budding scientist breathlessly lionizes their youth and ambition while granting only a passing mention — a sentence or two at best — to what they actually did.

This is an incredible disservice to both the scientific community and the public at large. First, it commits (in my opinion) the cardinal sin of science reporting: focusing on the scientist at the expense of the science. I understand that the ultimate goal of most reporting these days is to attract eyeballs and clicks to drive the rate at which the attention of readers can be sold to the highest bidder, and that narratives like these are easy viral feel-good stories. Who isn’t moved by the potential of extremely gifted students? However, because these stories represent such cherished narratives, scientific due diligence doesn’t happen.

It is precisely when we have a vested interest in something being true that we are compelled to be as skeptical about it as possible. However, the needs and wants of mass media and the general public are at cross purposes to scientific skepticism, so it doesn’t happen.

Perhaps the most egregious example of the media failing to do their homework and valuing personal narratives over scientific soundness is Jack Andraka, the Teen Prodigy of Pancreatic Cancer. Essentially, at the age of 15, Jack Andraka claimed to have invented a cheap, reliable test for pancreatic cancer and was celebrated by a wide variety of outlets. However, the test was founded on flawed science, didn’t work as promised, and was never fully described in a way that allowed for expert vetting. However, by investing so much effort and praise in Jack Andraka the scientist instead of Jack Andraka’s flawed science, the media put itself in an untenable position that was difficult to back out of.

I don’t believe that this is happening in this specific case, but this is one of the major pitfalls associated with this style of reporting. Celebrating the scientist before the science itself is vetted is irresponsible at best, and disgusting free advertising for a product at worst.

Secondly, any celebratory narrative about individual scientists (regardless of their age) is wrong. Contemporary science is not performed by individuals in isolation, but instead by large collaborative teams. Singling out one or even a few individuals for recognition is not only unfair to other members of the team, but is also a misrepresentation of how science is performed (but, hey, a charismatic representative helps sell product, so I understand why it happens).

Third, and perhaps worst, is that stories like these completely and totally undercut the reality that scientific research is HARD. Meaningful contributions to science are not and can not be made by solo actors over a six month span. This isn’t because insights are particularly difficult to come by, but instead, because the grinding path to making sure that your favorite ideas and hypotheses are correct requires meticulous experimentation to rule out as many reasonable competing hypotheses as you can think of. Being brilliant isn’t enough; you also have to be hard-working, dedicated, and meticulous. Science is and should be slow, because there’s too much at stake to rush and be wrong — but the science “journalism” that describes these discoverers is a significant threat to that.

Whenever you see a story like this reported by the mainstream media, you shouldn’t feel good — you should be angry.22.8K viewsView 213 upvotesView shares213328

How can I send Mark Zuckerberg a message he will read?

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Alon Amit

Former Product Manager (Ads) at Facebook (company)The short but honest answer is that you can't. There isn't any scalable way Zuck could let anyone in the world message him privately and read all those messages. Even if you happen to guess his personal e-mail address or work e-mail address, the chances that he'll read a message from someone he doesn't know and is not referred by anyone he does know are very, very small. This isn't because he's mean or indifferent - it's just because he's a highly visible individual with a particularly large number of people who wish to communicate with him, for a wide variety of reasons. Whatever it is you wish to achieve by sending Mark Zuckerberg a private message, there are possibly other approaches which are a lot more likely to be successful. Not knowing anything about your goal, it's hard to sugges.

Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in "The Social Network"?

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Jimmy Wales

Wikipedia, Wikia, WikiTribuneOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg a bad person as depicted in the movie "The Social Network"?

I know a few of the people who are depicted in the movie including Mark Zuckerberg and Sean Parker. I have heard some people comment on the movie in a way that I think is accurate: the worst thing about the movie is that as a movie it is actually pretty good, which means that it tells a compelling story.

Unfortunately, not much of that story is actually true.

Let's take one of the key elements of the movie - the suggestion that Mark created Facebook because a girl dumped him. There's that silly "Rosebud" (reference to Citizen Kane) moment at the end when he's shown sadly reloading her profile page. It's a great story, could come straight out of a dramatic Bollywood movie, but it actually has no resemblance to reality. Mark is still married to the woman he was dating when he started Facebook.

If you think Mark is obsessed with money, for example, you're missing the point there as well. I remember once sitting at a table with him, the Google guys, etc., and they were all talking about their jets. As one does, haha. I turned to Mark and said "Do you have a jet?" And he responded with genuine bewilderment: "How would I ever have a jet?" Facebook was already huge and valued in the billions. For all I know, he may have one by now (and why not?), but it wasn't of any interest to him and not a goal that he held.

Similarly, Sean Parker's character in the movie is not really accurate. It has some semblance of accuracy in a way. Sean does like to throw extravagant parties. But what is missing is his cleverness and basic sense of humanity. Do you know what he likes to talk about privately? Money, babes, power? No, actually, he's really got strong academic interests in medical research. He's a geek, and I mean that in the good way.

So, I would approach the movie as fiction - entertaining fiction - but try not to let it color your understanding of the people involved.

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What is it like to be interviewed by Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ashwin AJ

Being Engineer I only have experience of giving interview...Originally written by: Charlie Cheever At a birthday party in Belltown (a neighborhood of Seattle,) I ran into Dave Fetterman and Andrew 'Boz' Bosworth who I knew from school, and they had some news: "Guess what? We're quitting our jobs at Microsoft and going down to Silicon Valley to work at Facebook!" I liked Fetterman and Boz and thought they were smart and hearing this made me think that Facebook might actually be a legitimate company where I might find good people to work with. I ended up searching through my Blackberry for the e-mail Facebook had sent me and replying to it from the party. When I interviewed at Facebook, I remember being especially impressed by Dustin and Adam and the plans they outlined for what could be done next with Facebook, in particular news feed. Also, James.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg cover his headphone jack with tape?

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Hafiz Rahman

Worked at EntrepreneurshipI covered my laptop's cam for years since I first found out how easy it was to plant a malware on someone's computer. In my case, I planted one on my friend's PC from a video attachment she requested through YM back in my college days. It was just a joke but then I realized that I could turn on her webcam without her knowing (she had a webcam with no lights on it). I could browse her PC, listen to her while she types, copy some files and even make the system crash. I removed the malware straightaway before I think of anything worse. At that time, I thought "if I can do it with little effort, why couldn't those with better hacking skills do a lot worse?" But success at first try didn't stop me just yet. I tried several more times to different people I know, and succeed in some but failed.

What kind of cellphone does Mark Zuckerberg use?

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BIll Wanfeng·

Lived in ChinaOriginally Answered: Which phone does Mark Zuckerberg use the most?

must be iphone10K viewsView 13 upvotes132

Has money and power corrupted Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ron Maimon·

Lives in New York CityPeople are not corrupted by money and power, at least not in the naive way it is imagined. They are always just doing what they think is best, but when their company becomes enormous, their power becomes enormous, so they tend to engage in terribly desctructive behavior, but this is behavior that would not be predatory and harmful if their business were small, under those circumstances it would be beneficial. Acquiring a competitor and merging is not a problem for two small businesses. It sometimes makes sense. But gobbling up a small competitor when you are a giant means subjecting the management of the company to the dominance of an external bureaucracy which no one person is fully in control of. This squelches the creativity of the small company, in no small part because you have made a(more)

Does Mark Zuckerberg believe in privacy?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

Do not take this as an official statement from or about Facebook's stance towards privacy. It is also written in the form of an answer towards Anon User's comment in Blake Ross's answer below.

I don't really know what Zuck's approach to privacy is, but I do think he has a more nuanced and insightful view of it than most people do.

I do think that his product policies around privacy do more to reflect what he is reading from user desires (not advertisers and certainly not profit-seeking - the most naive interpretation of Facebook's privacy policies is that they are somehow driven by a desire for profit [1]) than anything else. Users ("average people") don't really think about privacy very deeply, and don't understand what it is or its interplay between their other values, and often make choices where they deprioritize privacy against other values, and this is reflected in their behavior and usage of the site, which Zuck is keenly aware of as a product and user-oriented CEO.

My observation of Facebook as a company (its people, including its executives) is that it cares a lot about privacy. It spends a lot of time thinking about it, it spends a lot of time thinking about how to protect its users' privacy, and then (ironically) it is continually surprised at how the vast majority of its users don't end up really caring at all to make use of various privacy-protection mechanisms built into the products. There are public flare-ups, but these are subject to a selection bias, in that there aren't flare-ups when people don't have a privacy issue (i.e. it is more a symptom of how often Facebook deals with privacy issues rather than how well/poorly it does). Instead, the company is often in a position of balancing user desires for a less-private product with its own feelings that user privacy needs to be protected more.

Consider: a product exists which can allow you, a user, to invade the privacy [to some degree, along a fairly muddy continuum] of other users. These users include your friends, family, and certain strangers. In return, it allows other people to invade your privacy in the same way, but you often don't know when they are doing it. I use the word "invade" here not to mean "cross some system-designed boundary," but in the muddier sense of "seeing some information I've technically made accessible but didn't think too much about and therefore would feel a little uncomfortable if certain people saw it." This is the root of most privacy "issues."

The problem is that the vast majority of users spend their time using Facebook to, essentially, invade the privacy of those around them (and of strangers they find interesting), and generally request feature modifications to enhance their ability to do so. They want profiles of strangers to be more public (so they can e.g. tell if someone is a former classmate), they want apps to be able to pull information about their friends (because the app is supposedly part of Facebook, so why can't it do so?), they want to see this and that which their friends want to hide from them. Almost no one says "I want my information to be more hidden by default and I would find the product more useful to me if it was so for everyone else."

The essential problem with privacy as a right is that it is not understood by most people in the way that other rights are. Most people understand that, e.g. the right to property is a reciprocal right: you want your property rights respected, and in turn you are willing to not steal things from others. This is not so with privacy. Plenty of people read with gushing delight the lurid details and gossip of celebrities or other semi-private individuals (like high-profile crime cases) - and demand a "right" to do so - when they would not be comfortable exposing such details about their own lives. How many of you, despite Tiger Woods specifically stating the the details of his affairs should be a private matter, nevertheless read the news reports about him and, in some cases, even looked up more information? Did you realize you were callously violating his privacy, providing the demand for tabloid articles? That's exactly the demand that users place on Facebook every day, wanting to invade the privacy of their friends, family, and acquaintance-strangers.

Mark Zuckerberg, having helmed the company from its earliest days, is pretty familiar and realistic about this being the zeitgeist of the userbase, as are many long-time employees, and he and many long-time employees are able to think about privacy in this way - i.e. both about privacy and about how people really think and act about privacy. Most of the company (owing to fast growth, the majority of the employee base at any one time has been there for less than 2 years) holds the realization of these user desires in a sort of mild horror and reluctance.

Therefore, my interpretation of the reality behind that quote (unsourced) is that Mark Zuckerberg probably cares about privacy, but he probably also understands it in a far deeper way than most people do, because he has to work with it in a real and practical sense, and so if he "doesn't believe in it," it's in the way that someone doesn't "believe in" a primitive and unexamined view of something when he has had to personally develop a fuller and deeper understanding of it.


Again:

This answer is highly speculative, not authoritative, and is based only on my personal observations in working with Zuck for a few years. It is also undoubtably colored by my own personal beliefs about privacy.

----

[1] One of the most naive and oft-repeated interpretations of every action Facebook takes is that it is being done out of an desire to maximize profits. These are often incorrect. A close study of Facebook's actions over its history will indicate that the company - and in particular Mark Zuckerberg - have deliberately and repeatedly made decisions that defer or even reduce revenue potential in pursuit of other goals.

Why does Mark Zuckerberg always wear the same shirt?

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Sai

IT Analyst at Dell International (2016–present)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg had his first-ever public Q&A session on Thursday.

He answered a lot of questions, but the one that got a lot of interest was, “Why do you wear the same T-shirt every day?”

For those who haven’t noticed, Zuckerberg wears the same gray T-shirt at most public events. While many expected a playful response, Zuckerberg gave a pretty serious answer for his penchant to wear the same gray shirt.

"I really want to clear my life to make it so that I have to make as few decisions as possible about anything except how to best serve this community," Zuckerberg said, after clarifying that he had "multiple same shirts."

He said even small decisions like choosing what to wear or what to eat for breakfast could be tiring and consume energy, and he didn't want to waste any time on that.

"I'm in this really lucky position, where I get to wake up every day and help serve more than a billion people. And I feel like I'm not doing my job if I spend any of my energy on things that are silly or frivolous about my life," he said.

Zuckerberg pointed out that numerous other influential people, like Apple founder Steve Jobs or President Barack Obama, have the same theory with regards to choosing their outfits. Jobs, in fact, told biographer Walter Isaacson that he even wanted to have all Apple employees wear the same vest.3.6K viewsView 2 upvotes2

How do I contact Mark Zuckerberg via postal mail?

João Paulino

Lived in Angola (2017–2017)

Hi, Mark Zuckerberg. I am African and I live in Angola. I am experiencing great economic difficulties in relation to the financing of my studies (higher education) after the death of my brother I no longer have where to turn. I ask the world that I have the opportunity to study, but it is difficult to find someone so charitable about it. Please help me

My email: joaopaulino07@hotmail.com1.2K viewsView 3 upvotes3

What are the things Adam D'Angelo taught Mark Zuckerberg?

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Ravi Mishra

Just another engineerMark Zuckerberg said that he learned a lot from Adam D'Angelo. This is the original blog post by Aaron Greenspan. Writing :: The Lost Chapter and this is the article on business insider. In Alleged New IMs, Mark Zuckerberg Says There Are Only '6 People In The World With Good Ideas'(more)

Why doesn't Mark Zuckerberg date supermodels?

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Will Chou

Lived in Washington, DC

Mark is a nerd. And people have different interests and tastes.

He gets more enjoyment from programming and building a business than he does from traveling the world, living on yachts, playing with dolls, creating music, or dating models.

It’s shocking to believe and I get you because I used to find it hard that other people didn’t share my interests and passions too. How come someone not see the beauty in star wars or how awesome a girl’s butt is?

But the truth is that people can have widely different views and values, though most people share similarities (think the standard bell curve).

Mark was obsessed with building and growing Facebook and that’s what he did.

He had a girl that was smart, going to be a doctor, loyal, honest, and hard working. Likely, he valued these traits, as you should, because they indicate a strong partner and (also coincidentally a strong employee to hire).

There are more and different things to value than just the superficial. Believe me, it’s hard for me to fathom too even though I understand it on a logical level because my genetics spur me to dramatically overemphasize the physical.

A lot of people imagine the supermodel to have a glamorous life and nothing but fantastic qualities: jet-setting around the world, rich, famous, beautiful, successful, ambitious, hard working … right?

But I’ve followed some of these girls on youtube via their vlogs and other social media and there lives aren’t ideal for a relationship. Because of work, they’re always traveling and never in the same city for long, which makes maintaining a relationship hard because it’s long distance.

Also, they’re constantly bombarded with different people they’re meeting, photoshoots, temptations, and parties.

While there is definitely hard work involved, luck plays more of a role in this field. The industry is built on reaching your peak earning potential while still very young (20 when most people live until their 80’s) so it is a breeding ground for people to get arrogant and large egos about their ability when a lot of it was due to their genetic luck around their beauty and dimensions.

It’s super easy and tempting to overemphasize the beauty of a woman over everything else, I fall for it too and it’s the natural thing for most men to do. Other CEO’s, like the CEO of Snapchat and Elon Musk, and band leaders, like Adam Levine, are dating or married to Victoria’s Secret models likely for this reason.

These models are typically seen by society as what society chooses as the “most beautiful women on earth” (whether or not that is true is debatable but you get the point). And many men fall for this as a measuring stick for their ego by showing off that they can get these highly desirable women at the top of the ego, often forsaking other qualities or overlooking other traits (empathy, emotional intelligence, hustle, ambition, caring, etc.) for this title.

And maybe that’s why Elon’s two times divorced. But maybe not.6.2K viewsView 21 upvotes21

How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg?

Anonymous

: How can I reach Mark Zuckerberg? Its an emergency situation

Oh my goodness, that is so cute on multiple levels.

  1. You think 'inspiring' a group of college students is an emergency
  2. You think it is such an emergency that you could compel a billionaire to fly to New York or otherwise participate in some fashion

I'm shocked. Are people in this world really so naive? What could possibly make you think you could get any help to inspire a group of apathetic millennials?

How good of a programmer is Mark Zuckerberg and does he still sometimes code for Facebook?

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Dakini Alexandra Isenegger·

CEO @Linkilaw | Forbes 30 Under 30 | Top Writer 2017 & 2018In 2006, Zuckerberg gave up coding to focus on running the business of Facebook. When visiting Nigeria in August 2016, he admitted publicly that giving up coding to manage his company was "a little sad"."There is an elegance to writing code that I miss," Zuckerberg said during a Q&A session with tech entrepreneurs and developers in Lagos, Nigeria. "The code always does what you want - and people don't." Even though he has expressed love for programming, Zuckerberg majored in psychology, not computer science. His peers don’t place him in the uppermost tier of skilled coders. On TopCoder, a site where coders improve and rank their skills, he's only in the third level. Adam D'Angelo — the former CTO of Facebook and founder of Quora — is in the top level, "red."

What was it like to go to Harvard with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Aamer Tahseen·

Back on this site...for nowMy dad used to go with him for a temporary study computer science so he told me the story of the Facebook experience from his point of view. At the time Zuckerberg was a prodigy, and he always won the attention of the teachers, every time my dad used to raise his hand during lectures, the professor would still ignore him, even though Zuckerberg wasn't even listening in class he would be picked. As the year passed by, and Zuckerberg was slowly coming into the development of "Facebook", my father always noticed his wide interests in social communications, at the time, for undergraduates there would be something called a "face book", a collage for names and pictures of students, my dad didn't even care because, but he did notice that Zuckerberg was always fascinated by that and he always sp(more)

Why is Mark Zuckerberg's Twitter user name finkd?

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Samuel E. Koranteng

There's a silver lining to all this global chaos, and Mark believes that. After Mark stopped visiting New York when his cousin was robbed by amateur droids, he ventured down a new path of telekinetic travel. It was on one of these trips that he met Finkelton! -an unusually tiny species of alien who advised him to acquire a billion dollars in 3 month. Thus Facebook was born. That Twitter name is a memorial to one of Mark's best advisers from outer space, who was incinerated three months ago. Disclaimer: Mark mentioned here is Mark Jupalopa of Senegal, and the writer reserves the right to humorous answers!(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

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Adam Rifkin·Updated May 19, 2012Better to be a Founder than a Loser.Originally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing?

The valuation jumps from round to round were orders of magnitude until Facebook hit a $15 billion valuation, resulting in tiny dilutions accompanying each financing.

Note also that with every financing, the Silicon Valley echo chamber thought the investors were nuts to offer such rich valuations. It's now clear the echo chamber was wrong every time; the investors were quite savvy, as a matter of fact.

I don't know exact numbers, but I believe Facebook's equity sales to investors were roughly:

Sep 04 -- 10% sold for $500k. ($5mm valuation -- Peter Thiel, Angels)

May 05 -- 12.7% sold for $12.7mm. ($100mm valuation -- Accel)

Apr 06 -- 5% sold for $27.5mm. ($550mm valuation -- Greylock, Meritech, Founders Fund)

Oct 07 -- 1.6% sold for $240mm. ($15b valuation -- Microsoft)

Nov 07 thru Apr 08 -- 0.9% sold for $135mm ($15b valuation -- Li Ka-shing and European Founders Fund)

May 08 -- no dilution; took $100mm in venture debt from Triple Point Capital

May 09 -- 1.3% sold for $200mm. ($15b valuation -- Digital Sky Technologies)

Jun 10 -- 0.8% sold for $120mm (a blended $14b valuation -- Elevation)

Jan 11 -- 3% sold for $1.5b ($50b valuation -- thank you Goldman Sachs!)

Feb 11 -- 0.1% sold for $38mm ($52b valuation -- really, KPCB?!)


Alexia Tsotsis did an incredible job representing these financing rounds as a fantastic infographic: TechCrunch.com/2011/01/10/facebook-5/

The Next Web and Scobleizer have an excellent graphic of who owns Facebook as of 1/11/11, accounting for dilutions: TheNextWeb.com/facebook/2011/01/12/so-who-really-owns-facebook-chart/

The reasons for drastic up rounds of valuation each time were:

1) The unprecedented momentum of product's core metrics (users and usage).

2) The excellent advice and guidance from the beginning, first from Stephen Venuto and Sean Parker, then Peter Thiel and Reid Garrett Hoffman, then Matt Cohler and Jim Breyer, and at some point Marc Andreessen.

3) Enough revenues (mostly ads) to never have to raise a round with unfriendly terms. See Carlos Tobin's answer to How did Mark Zuckerberg retain 26% of equity after so many rounds of financing? What was the initial equity division?

The unusual combination of tremendous product momentum and the right people involved created the ideal conditions for such tiny dilution.


One other factor: Zuck never had an equal co-founder like Larry and Sergey. Were that the case, both Zuck and co-Zuck would each own 13%, rendering them roughly the same as pre-IPO Google.

See also: What were the 4 or 5 key decisions that Mark Zuckerberg made in the early days of Facebook?

Is Mark Zuckerberg difficult to work with?

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Yishan Wong

Worked at Facebook (company)No. There are plenty of people who are happy to work with him, though there are also plenty who find it difficult. He is not some sort of ideally charismatic person whose primary quality is that he's easy to get along with. Rather, he's a demanding CEO with a monomaniacal focus on making Facebook succeed in its mission. This is not to say that he's mean - he's a perfectly nice guy on a personal level; it's just that professionally, he is focused on getting it done, and has a limited tolerance for emotional fragility in the people he needs to help him execute on that mission. In my study of business leaders, I've yet to come across one who was considered "great" who didn't also have a significant body count of ex-employees claiming that they were autocratic and mean. Examples include Jac(more)

Is Mark Zuckerberg a good human being?

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Personally, I don't think he's that great. I always think of random ideas and wonder "hmm should I mock something up and try to implement it?", but I never do cause I'm complacent with my daily routines. Couple years back I got really sick and took a leave from work, which left me with some availability in my day (when not complaining about my aching body). I was trying to complete something on Facebook and was having some difficulties sorting out the privacy permission settings and thought for something that was designed to be user friendly, it really isn't that friendly. Well, I had time to mock something up to potentially make Facebook user friendly. With over 30 hours of brainstorming and trying to convince my dog that his walk would be in 10 minutes, I had a eureka moment.

Does Mark Zuckerberg have mild Asperger's?

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Blandine Mifsud·

17 years in a relationship with a self-harming partnerOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic?

NOTE: The original question was:”Is Mark Zuckerberg autistic” My answer was to that exact question and not to the merge and different: Is Mark Zuckerberg psychopathic”

Kahn compares psychopathy to autism, not because the two disorders are similar in their manifestation, but because they're both neurological disorders. There is an overlap between the symptoms of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders. Those two disorders require differential diagnosis:

[Differential diagnosis of psychopathy and autism spectrum disorders in adults. Empathic deficit as a core symptom].


Hi Gabriela, I do not know for sure as I have not investigated him.

NOTE: It would take me more than one week to asses him (or anyone). I don’t even do proper assessment. I simply investigate genetics with dysmorphology. Focusing only on some specific personalities: the ones that I consider to be of specific interest regarding my current investigation. At the present time, Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t fit my criteria / doesn’t interest me. I‘ll certainly not investigate him unless Mark himself will contact me for that purpose. Secondly, considering that I’m an amateur detective and not a professional geneticist, obviously he will never made such request.

What I can say from few seconds checking pictures from Google is that Mark Zuckerberg seems to have few dysmorphic facial features.

He seems to have an asymmetric face. Asymmetric face indicates a problem on the midline, a rather symptomatic occurrence in male autistic patients. Patient with this cranial anomaly tend to have some others anomalies. Mark has an extremely mild orbital hypotelorism (an abnormally decreased distance between the eyes).

Autistic people have more anomalies related to their ears : Size, rotation, location….

Mark’s ears doesn’t seem to be on the same level: it could be a sign of sensory disorder, a condition comorbid in autism. Sensory disorder exists without autism.

Clinical research: Facial features can help diagnose autism | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Autistic people collect routines: routines in speech, routine in behaviors, routine in postures… Mark Z have limited facial expression, limited postures. I could not help to notice the way he holds his hands seems very repetitive. It’s difficult not to notice that he is not a fashion addict neither: his wardrobe is basically a grey tee shirt + jean or a dark costume with a white shirt..and a tie (of changing colors in hue ranging from grey to blue).

Autism is a spectrum. A wide spectrum. Most of those on the spectrum have special interest in which they will become real experts. It’s hard to deny Mark Zuckerberg is above fluent in computer. You need a special brain to master that technologie the way he masters it…

At the present time dysmorphology is not used as a diagnostic tool for autism. Before Mark could qualify as autistic he will have to fill each an every of the six Gillberg’s criteria for confirmation of diagnosis.

GILLBERG'S CRITERIA FOR ASPERGER'S DISORDER (SYNDROME)

  1. Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction
    (at least two of the following)
    (a) inability to interact with peers
    (b) lack of desire to interact with peers
    (c) lack of appreciation of social cues
    (d) socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior

2. All-absorbing narrow interest
(at least one of the following)
(a) exclusion of other activities
(b) repetitive adherence
(c) more rote than meaning

3. Imposition of routines and interests
(at least one of the following)
(a) on self, in aspects of life
(b) on others

4. Speech and language problems
(at least three of the following)
(a) delayed development
(b) superficially perfect expressive language
(c) formal, pedantic language
(d) odd prosody, peculiar voice characteristics
(e) impairment of comprehension including misinterpretations of literal/implied meanings

5. Non-verbal communication problems
(at least one of the following)
(a) limited use of gestures
(b) clumsy/gauche body language
(c) limited facial expression
(d) inappropriate expression
(e) peculiar, stiff gaze

6.Motor clumsiness: poor performance on neurodevelopmental examination

Considering that Mark did take a parternity leave following the birth of his daughter, he doesn’t seems to have inability to interact with peers or lack of desire to interact with peers. In order to qualify as autistic Marck will have to fill the criteria of Severe impairment in reciprocal social interaction with either the lack of appreciation of social cues and to behave socially and emotionally inappropriate.

How good is Mark Zuckerberg's Chinese?

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Glenn Luk

Expert in the ABC dialectOn a scale from Chris Tucker to Dashan, his accent is somewhere between John Cena and Jon Huntsman. Here is Mark speaking at Tsinghua University in October 2014: A year later, he gave another speech in Mandarin (Facebook Video) and he had clearly improved. And then for Chinese New Year 2016, he and his wife Priscilla uploaded a video: You can tell that his Chinese is getting better over time. Honestly, in the New Year’s video it’s probably on the same level as his (Chinese-American) wife. If he has been keeping it up, it should be even better by now! P.S. I really have a lot of respect for Mark for putting himself out there and speaking Chinese in public even though it is not his native language. 加油 Mark! P.P.S. Accent can be

How academically smart is Mark Zuckerberg? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

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Robert Scoble

Former Chief Strategy Officer at Infinite Retina (2019–2020)Originally Answered: How smart is Mark Zuckerberg, academic-wise? Is he as smart as Bill Gates?

I've spent time with both several times. I find Bill Gates is just an amazing intellect, and I don't think it's fair to compare ANYONE to him. Zuckerberg is also an amazing intellect, but it's different and we haven't had as many opportunities to study him the way we have had with Gates.

Bill Gates has a photographic memory. One time he said something on stage word-for-word that I had told him six months prior. Many people I know have these experiences with Bill. Every time I meet him I mostly listen. My intellect isn't even close to his. Zuckerberg, though, for some reason, feels a bit more approachable, but I attribute that to his age and the fact that he's building something I understand a bit more than I understood the internals of Windows.

Zuckerberg, too, is damn smart and in recent conversations with him I've come away thinking "he just is doing better thinking on social software than anyone else." Plus, in addition to his other academic qualifications, he studied Chinese for his recent trip. I was only able to learn a few words. I'm sure he did a lot better! :-) I don't remember Gates learning other languages (update: Gary Stein says that he and his wife are learning Chinese), although I'm sure he'd count basic and C++ as other languages.

On the other hand, Zuckerberg seems more comfortable in social settings, walking me right up to Jet Li and introducing us at a Time party. I met Gates at one party in the mid-90s and just had a tough time getting him to talk until we started talking about just-in-time compilers and then he went on for half an hour. At last year's TED in the hallways Bill did the same thing, but instead of talking compilers was talking about nuclear power.

Zuckerberg has impressed me similarly, but is still focused on building Facebook so isn't spending much time thinking about other things. Clearly, as the questioner showed, Zuckerberg is a smart dude too and picks things up VERY fast. I witnessed this when Zuckerberg met other CEOs and discussed the technologies they were using to build their companies.

So, to answer the question: Gates wins, but mostly because we've seen how he learns new topics for a longer time.

What would be interesting is to put the 26-year-old Gates next to the 26-year-old Zuckerberg and compare them. If we did that then Zuckerberg probably would win.1.3M viewsView 15,523 upvotesView shares15.5K29196

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What has Adam D'Angelo learned from Mark Zuckerberg?

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Chirag Shah

Former Software Developer at Barclays Investment Bank (company) (2018–2019)

I am not the right person to answer this, but I would like to have my say.

Adam D'Angelo - the former CTO of Facebook was a pure geek guy with amazing coding abilities in his early days, we can see this from his topcoder profile. dangelo Profile | TopCoder He was at top level, “red”.

On the other hand Zuckerberg's profile on the site is at the "green" level which isn’t as good as the one Angelo has. mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder

Having said that, Zuckerberg knew how to build projects, he knew how systems were built, how to bring the ideas into reality and how to indulge people by using the notion of ‘connectivity’.

This can be concluded from that fact that he developed a ‘course selection program’ and ‘facemash’ in his sophomore year at Harvard.

During a CS50 course, Mark had delivered a guest lecture regarding how he expanded and scaled facebook to a global level.

Here is his talk:

Mark was very confident in whatever he did, he had a sense of control in what he built. He had a clear vision and he always wanted to build his product for the people, he wanted people to be connected to each other.

These were the qualities which could have been observed by Adam.

Apart from his coding prowess, Adam could have learned how to build a company, how to scale the products and monetize them.

Also given the fact that whole idea of Mark was to connect people, Adam could have been inspired by this very whole idea of ‘how to connect people’ and hence he built this amazing ‘Quora’ where people were more connected by their questions and ideas, where they could share their views and opinions.

This is just my take on this subject. What Adam has learned can be answered by no one other than him.

Why is Mark Zuckerberg so hated?

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Quy Tan

Knows VietnameseI think because of the following reasons: 1. He is a Jew. If you visit White Supremacist forums (I visit these harmful websites sometimes, just because of curiosity), they hate Jew and Israel deeply, and especially they hate the most famous, richest, most successful and most powerful Jew like Mark Zuckerberg. Oh don't worry, they hate everything. They hate Black, Chinese, and White Liberal as well. 2. He is accused of anti-conservative bias. He also got hated by Trump supporters. For example, he often fact-checks or even delete wrong claim or disinformation regarding Coronavirus by Trump or some Trump supporters. 3. Rumors and fake news: It is so ridiculous that New Tang Dynasty Vietnam claim that Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg are a “slave” of China, and work for China favor. While in China, people cl(more)

What are some interesting facts about Mark Zuckerberg?

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Bhanu Prasad

UI Developer at Virtusa (company)Here are a few facts about the facebook legend... 1) All Blue Facebook CEO is red-green colour blind, which means that the best colour he can see is blue. Zuckerberg reportedly once said, "Blue is the richest colour for me. I can see all of blue." No prizes for guessing why blue is the most dominant colour on the world's top social networking site. 2) Declined job offers from Microsoft, AOL While in high school, Zuckerberg co-developed a music app called Synapse Media Player. Tech giants Microsoft and AOL reportedly offered Zuckerberg a million dollars to further develop the app as well as wanted to hire him. Zuckerberg instead chose to join Harvard University. 3) Doesn't own a TV, calls himself atheist Born to Jewish parents, Zuckerberg considers himself an atheist. According to a report in Busi(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg become a programming prodigy?

David Roth

Former Digital SE at Amazon (company) (2011–2013)Originally Answered: how did Mark Zuckerberg train himself to be a programming prodigy?

This is a very interesting question to me because, as several responders have pointed out already, it's based on a flawed premise. Mark Zuckerberg is not the person that most coders would think of when they hear the term "programming prodigy".

I think the questioner equates fame, wealth, or success with being a prodigy. This is almost never the case in coding. Coders who are good will generally make a good living but they do not, as a rule, become CEOs.

When I think of a programming prodigy, the first person who comes to mind is Paul Allen, because of the anecdote about writing the loader for Microsoft Basic for the Altair computer while flying to Albuquerque. Note that this was in 1975; there weren't laptops that you could take on a plane then. Allen was writing machine code on a piece of paper with a pencil, and he created a loader program that worked. That's pretty amazing. Altair BASIC

Another prodigy would be Margaret Hamilton. She wrote the code for the Apollo space program. The sheer scope of that project and the hardware limitations she was dealing with are staggering. She had finished this code by the time she was 31. Margaret Hamilton (scientist)

As for the "how did x train themselves to become a prodigy" part of the question, you don't really train to become a prodigy. A prodigy is someone who is exceptionally good at what they do; there is an implication in term that the person is naturally gifted. A prodigy has a natural interest in their chosen art and they're good at it, so they enjoy practicing it and studying it. "Training to become a prodigy" is kind of like "training to become lucky"; it's a nonsensical proposition.60K viewsView 337 upvotesView shares33726

How self-disciplined is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Arjun Singh

Content Creator at BackNo (2018–present)Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg is very sensitive Entrepreneur in the world. I have noticed many things when I read the blog, books and watched videos. so all I want to share on Quora platform. * Only Only Eats What I Kills: * * Zuckerberg's view on nutrition ethics is similar to some types of Buddhist vegetarianism and Locavorism. And as he himself admitted, it's "basically" a vegetarian diet. However, the fact that Zuckerberg did kill some animals himself — according to Fortune, this includes a lobster, chicken, pig and a goat — to eat them will surely stir some controversy. Zuckerberg even posted a message on his private Facebook page on May 4 saying, "I just killed a pig and a goat." * Set annual goals: * * Despite his claim of laser-focus, Zuckerberg has always had interests beyond social media. B(more)

How does Mark Zuckerberg manage his time?

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Pascal Lorig

Lives in GermanyThe key is outsourcing. No matter if Mark Zuckerberg, Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, all of them have personal assistants and a crew around them. Their business basically is running itself. Their job is showing the course. That is why they do meetings all the time. Private time does not require much management, because there is very little. Steve Jobs for instance took his spare time for having dinner with the whole family. Once a year he made time for holidays. Mark Zuckerberg himself said that you get what you spend the most time on. So he eliminates all distractions. For instance his clothing is always the same. He is also known for sleeping less than usual people. So that gives him extra time. People like Mark Zuckerberg also have to prioritise.

How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email? How many hundreds or thousands of emails do they receive daily, and how do they manage them? Do they have an assistant that filters all the important stuff?

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Tim Williams

Originally Answered: How do Bill Gates, Larry Page, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey manage their email?

It's all about the content of the email that determines how it would be handled.

They are humans, they get notifications of new mail, and assuming they're near their device, they will see it firsthand like the rest of us.

Here are some possibilities for handling:

  • Direct communication with other leaders of the company, employees, relevant partner companies, important service providers, and of course financial/banking matters. I'd also assume even government and other national and international matters.
  • Basic filters for newsletters, list emails from companies/competitors they're interested in, and other subject matters they follow.
  • Pre-written personal responses for some frequent inquiries: Can you attend my conference, talk to me on the phone about my project, mentor me, or some other general ask that... if they weren't so highly desired, they would be likely to want to listen to you. These are replies they can copy/paste from drafts, Evernote, or whatever tool of choice.
  • Forward to the appropriate person. Often times, emails are sent to these figures misguidedly. There are plenty of people who work for them who are far more suited to reply, so for a basic example, a legitimate email for some real business development opportunity - would be forwarded without a personal response to the appropriate person.
  • Personal Assistant(s). For things like scheduling meetings, phone calls, events, and other things that said recipient wants to actually take part in, they are unlikely to coordinate the logistics personally. This is where they may confirm something by email and then pass off to a PA to handle the details. A PA may also convert verbal responses into email responses for convenience and speed.
  • Multiple email addresses. I am less sure of this one, but I'd guess that they have an email address that's easy enough to guess that they do monitor (first.last@whatever.com) that follows the above protocol that receives a bulk of it. Then, they probably have a secondary company email that is strictly private or even perhaps limited to company and authorized sender list only for what I'll call "daily biz". And of course lastly, one or more personal email addresses to communicate with family and others.

In summary, it's all about what the content of the email is and that will determine any number of filters as to how it's handled.

What are some of Mark Zuckerberg's mistakes at Facebook?

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Eric Benjamin Seufert

Author of Freemium Economics, Owner of Mobile Dev MemoFacebook waited too long to transition to mobile (Facebook only launched its native iOS app in August 2012! Facebook Launches Native App for iPhone and iPad, Rebuilt From Ground Up) and as a result wasn't able to capture the mobile advertising market in near entirety, which it almost certainly would have had it focused on mobile (and, subsequently, mobile advertising) sooner. Had Facebook acted faster, it probably could have preempted the creation of the affiliate / syndication networks that proliferated on mobile beginning in around 2012 and added tens of billions of dollars to its enterprise value at exactly the point when many public investors became skittish about its future prospects (Facebook Stock Sinks Below $30 -- How Much Farther Will it Drop?). That said, Facebook's transition t(more)

Should Mark Zuckerberg slowly phase advertising out of Facebook's ecosystem?

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Mark Rogowsky

Forbes technology, raconteur, @maxrogoBy all means. I mean, it's currently only about 90% of Facebook's revenue. And that revenue is only going to be about $5 billion this year. And it was zero just a few years ago. So, I mean clearly this whole advertising thing isn't working out for Facebook. Also, the company only has something like a billion users and only half of them log on daily. And when it rolled out its newest ad product, Sponsored Stories, it only found that was worth about $1 million per day. To make matters worse, only half that revenue was coming from mobile -- and lots of people use Facebook on mobile. Finally, it's crystal clear that for Facebook to exploit new monetization schemes it has to stop making money from advertising because clearly those are mutually exclusive. There is obviously no way to begin chargi(more)

Between Mark Zuckerberg and Elon Musk, who is more selfish? Why?

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Sean Chou

Business Intelligence Consultant & small business owner;ENTJUndoubtedly Mark Zuckerberg is more selfish. Zuckerberg’s professional motto has always been “connecting the world” through Facebook, which any self-respecting person can see serves his own purposes. Facebook now touts half or nearly half the world's population as users, and it continues to grow. Not so long ago, Zuckerberg wished to be the face of modern colonialism by “gifting” large portions of India with free wifi internet access, albeit tethered permanently to his own Facebook platform. India refused it unsurprisingly, and Zuckerberg jested that India didn't want to “step into the future.” Nevertheless, he did not pursue giving India free internet without also shoving Facebook down their throats. Another case in point: Zuckerberg has pledged with so many other billionaires to give away(more)

How can I get in touch with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Joe Tannorella

Founder at UIDB.io (2016–present)When I wanted to contact an equally famous person - Sir Richard Branson - I made this: Dear Sir Richard Branson It took 2 weeks of pure hustle, including: * Calling all of his company receptions (Virgin Group reception were especially receptive) * Asking everyone in my network * Trying to reach his family members and their respective companies: son, daughter * Messaging all of his company CEOs via email and LinkedIn Premium * Commenting on his social media posts * Facebook advertising. Targeted him, his family, and more * Calling the BBC when I found out that SRB was live on their show that evening * Twitter advertising * …A hell of a lot more… You have to really want it. And you have to give him a reason to want to read what you’re telling him. Good luck!(more)

Who is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Mayank Sharma

HR at Teleperformance Indore (2019–present)Originally Answered:

Who is Mark Zukerburg?

Mark Zuckerberg ( Chief Executive Officer of Facebook )

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is an American technology entrepreneur and philanthropist. Zuckerberg is known for co-founding and leading Facebook as its chairman and chief executive officer. He also co-founded and is a board member of the solar sail spacecraft development project Breakthrough Starshot

Who Is Mark Zuckerberg?

Born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, Mark Zuckerberg co-founded the social-networking website Facebook out of his college dorm room.

He left Harvard after his sophomore year to concentrate on the site, the user base of which has grown to more than 2 billion people, making Zuckerberg a billionaire many times over. The birth of Facebook was portrayed in the 2010 film The Social Network.

Early Life

Mark Elliot Zuckerberg was born on May 14, 1984, in White Plains, New York, into a comfortable, well-educated family, and raised in the nearby village of Dobbs Ferry.

His father, Edward Zuckerberg, ran a dental practice attached to the family's home. His mother, Karen, worked as a psychiatrist before the birth of the couple's four children—Mark, Randi, Donna and Arielle.

Zuckerberg developed an interest in computers at an early age; when he was about 12, he used Atari BASIC to create a messaging program he named "Zucknet." His father used the program in his dental office, so that the receptionist could inform him of a new patient without yelling across the room. The family also used Zucknet to communicate within the house.

Together with his friends, he also created computer games just for fun. "I had a bunch of friends who were artists," he said. "They'd come over, draw stuff, and I'd build a game out of it."

Education

To keep up with Mark's burgeoning interest in computers, his parents hired private computer tutor David Newman to come to the house once a week and work with Mark. Newman later told reporters that it was hard to stay ahead of the prodigy, who began taking graduate courses at nearby Mercy College around this same time.

Zuckerberg later studied at Phillips Exeter Academy, an exclusive preparatory school in New Hampshire. There he showed talent in fencing, becoming the captain of the school's team. He also excelled in literature, earning a diploma in classics.

Yet Zuckerberg remained fascinated by computers, and continued to work on developing new programs. While still in high school, he created an early version of the music software Pandora, which he called Synapse.

Several companies—including AOL and Microsoft—expressed an interest in buying the software, and hiring the teenager before graduation. He declined the offers.

Zuckerberg at Harvard

After graduating from Exeter in 2002, Zuckerberg enrolled at Harvard University. By his sophomore year at the Ivy League institution, he had developed a reputation as the go-to software developer on campus. It was at that time that he built a program called CourseMatch, which helped students choose their classes based on the course selections of other users.

He also invented Facemash, which compared the pictures of two students on campus and allowed users to vote on which one was more attractive. The program became wildly popular, but was later shut down by the school administration after it was deemed inappropriate.

Based on the buzz of his previous projects, three of his fellow students—Divya Narendra, and twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss—sought him out to work on an idea for a social networking site they called Harvard Connection. This site was designed to use information from Harvard's student networks in order to create a dating site for the Harvard elite.

Zuckerberg agreed to help with the project, but soon dropped out to work on his own social networking site with friends Dustin Moskovitz, Chris Hughes and Eduardo Saverin.

Zuckerberg and his friends created a site that allowed users to create their own profiles, upload photos, and communicate with other users. The group ran the site—first called The Facebook—out of a dorm room at Harvard until June 2004.

After his sophomore year, Zuckerberg dropped out of college to devote himself to Facebook full time, moving the company to Palo Alto, California. By the end of 2004, Facebook had 1 million users.

Facebook Rises

In 2005, Zuckerberg's enterprise received a huge boost from the venture capital firm Accel Partners. Accel invested $12.7 million into the network, which at the time was open only to Ivy League students.

Zuckerberg's company then granted access to other colleges, high school and international schools, pushing the site's membership to more than 5.5 million users by December 2005. The site then began attracting the interest of other companies, who wanted to advertise with the popular social hub.

Not wanting to sell out, Zuckerberg turned down offers from companies such as Yahoo! and MTV Networks. Instead, he focused on expanding the site, opening up his project to outside developers and adding more features.

Legal Hurdles

Zuckerberg seemed to be going nowhere but up. However, in 2006, the business mogul faced his first big hurdle: the creators of Harvard Connection claimed that Zuckerberg stole their idea, and insisted the software developer needed to pay for their business losses.

Zuckerberg maintained that the ideas were based on two very different types of social networks but, after lawyers searched Zuckerberg's records, incriminating instant messages revealed that Zuckerberg may have intentionally stolen the intellectual property of Harvard Connection and offered Facebook users' private information to his friends.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the incriminating messages, saying he regretted them. "If you're going to go on to build a service that is influential and that a lot of people rely on, then you need to be mature, right?" he said in an interview with The New Yorker. "I think I've grown and learned a lot."

Although an initial settlement of $65 million was reached between the two parties, the legal dispute over the matter continued well into 2011, after Narendra and the Winklevosses claimed they were misled in regards to the value of their stock.

'The Social Network'

Zuckerberg faced yet another personal challenge when the 2009 book The Accidental Billionaires, by writer Ben Mezrich, hit stores. Mezrich was heavily criticized for his re-telling of Zuckerberg's story, which used invented scenes, re-imagined dialogue and fictional characters.

Regardless of how true-to-life the story was, Mezrich managed to sell the rights of the tale to screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, and the critically acclaimed film The Social Network received eight Academy Award nominations.

Zuckerberg objected strongly to the film's narrative, and later told a reporter at The New Yorker that many of the details in the film were inaccurate. For example, Zuckerberg had been dating longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan, a Chinese-American medical student he met at Harvard, since 2003. He also said he never had interest in joining any of the final clubs.

"It's interesting what stuff they focused on getting right; like, every single shirt and fleece that I had in that movie is actually a shirt or fleece that I own," Zuckerberg told a reporter at a startup conference in 2010. "So there's all this stuff that they got wrong and a bunch of random details that they got right."

Yet Zuckerberg and Facebook continued to succeed, in spite of the criticism. Time magazine named him Person of the Year in 2010, and Vanity Fair placed him at the top of their New Establishment list.

Net Worth

Forbes ranked Zuckerberg at No. 35—beating out Apple CEO Steve Jobs—on its "400" list, estimating his net worth to be $6.9 billion at the time.

Philanthropic Causes

Since amassing his sizeable fortune, Zuckerberg has used his millions to fund a variety of philanthropic causes. The most notable examples came in 2010: In September of that year, he donated $100 million to save the failing Newark Public Schools system in New Jersey.

Then, in December 2010, Zuckerberg signed the "Giving Pledge", promising to donate at least 50 percent of his wealth to charity over the course of his lifetime. Other Giving Pledge members include Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and George Lucas. After his donation, Zuckerberg called on other young, wealthy entrepreneurs to follow suit.

"With a generation of younger folks who have thrived on the success of their companies, there is a big opportunity for many of us to give back earlier in our lifetime and see the impact of our philanthropic efforts," he said.

Facebook IPO

Zuckerberg made two major life changes in May 2012: Facebook had its initial public offering, which raised $16 billion, making it the biggest Internet IPO in history.

After the initial success of the IPO, the Facebook stock price dropped somewhat in the early days of trading, though Zuckerberg is expected to weather any ups and downs in his company's market performance.

Wife

Also in May 2012—one day after the IPO—Zuckerberg wed his longtime girlfriend, Priscilla Chan. About 100 people gathered at the couple's Palo Alto, California home.

The guests thought they were there to celebrate Chan's graduation from medical school, but instead they witnessed Zuckerberg and Chan exchange vows.

One year later, Facebook made the Fortune 500 list for the first time—making Zuckerberg, at the age of 28, the youngest CEO on the list.

Daughter

In November 2015, Zuckerberg and Chan welcomed a daughter, Max, and Zuckerberg announced he would be taking two months of paternity leave to spend with his family. He and his wife also pledged in an open letter to their daughter that they would give 99 percent of their Facebook shares to charity.

"We are committed to doing our small part to help create this world for all children," the couple wrote in the open letter that was posted on Zuckerberg's Facebook page. "We will give 99% of our Facebook shares — currently about $45 billion — during our lives to join many others in improving this world for the next generation."

In September 2016, Zuckerberg and Chan announced that the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), the company into which they put their Facebook shares, would invest at least $3 billion into scientific research over the next decade to help “cure, prevent and manage all diseases in our children's lifetime." Renowned neuroscientist Cori Bargmann of The Rockefeller University, was named the president of science at CZI.

They also announced the founding of Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, a San Francisco-based independent research center that will bring together engineers, computer scientists, biologists, chemists and others in the scientific community. A partnership between Stanford University, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley, Biohub will receive initial funding of $600 million over 10 years.

In March 2017, Zuckerberg and Chan announced on Facebook that they were expecting their second child. Daughter August was born on August 28.

The CEO has undertaken a personal challenge at the start of every year since 2009, with previous efforts including learning to speak Mandarin and only eating meat he had killed himself.

Fake News and Cambridge Analytica Scandal

After enduring criticism for the proliferation of fake news posts on his site leading up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Zuckerberg in early 2018 announced his personal challenge to develop improved methods for defending Facebook users from abuse and interference by nation-states.

"We won't prevent all mistakes or abuse, but we currently make too many errors enforcing our policies and preventing misuse of our tools," he wrote on his Facebook page. "If we're successful this year then we'll end 2018 on a much better trajectory."

However, Zuckerberg came under fire again a few months later when it was revealed that Cambridge Analytica, a data firm with ties to President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, had used private information from approximately 87 million Facebook profiles without the social network alerting its owners. The resulting outcry seemed to shake investors' confidence in Facebook, its shares dropping by 15 percent after the news became public.

Following a few days' silence, Zuckerberg surfaced on various outlets to explain how the company was taking steps to limit third-party developers' access to user information, and said he would be happy to testify before Congress. On Sunday, March 25, Facebook took out full-page ads in seven British and three American newspapers, penned in the form of a personal apology from Zuckerberg. He promised the company would investigate all of its apps, and remind users which ones they can shut off. "I’m sorry we didn’t do more at the time," he wrote. "I promise to do better for you."

Amid increasing calls for his resignation from investor groups, Zuckerberg traveled to Capitol Hill and met with lawmakers ahead of his two-day testimony, scheduled for April 10 and 11. The first day of hearings, with the Senate Commerce and Judiciary Committees, was considered a tame affair, with some senators seemingly struggling to understand the business model that powered the social media giant.

The follow-up hearing before House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee proved far testier, as its members grilled the Facebook CEO over privacy concerns. During the day's testimony, Zuckerberg revealed that his personal information was among the data harvested by Cambridge Analytica, and suggested that legal regulation of Facebook and other social media companies was "inevitable."

The negative PR seemingly did little to slow the company's progress, as Facebook rebounded to see its stock close at a record $203.23 on July 6. The surge bumped Zuckerberg past Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett to become the world's third-richest person, behind fellow tech titans Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates.

However, the gains were wiped out when Facebook shares dropped a staggering 19 percent on July 26, following an earnings report that revealed a failure to meet revenue expectations and slowing user growth, erasing nearly $16 billion of Zuckerberg's personal fortune in one day.

Info Source - Mark Zuckerberg

How did Mark Zuckerberg propose to Priscilla Chan?

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Dhaval Mehta·

Studied Computer Science

heres the answer... The Love Story of Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan

How is Mark Zuckerberg rich?

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Divya Dave

Mark Zukerberg and Elon Musk!Well answer is because of us! Yes its true.There us no doubt that Facebook is one of the largest social network with billions of users! And still there is no doubt that Facebook founder MARK ZUKERBERG is considered as one of the billionaire in the world. But how? Advertising When users log in and share their information like interests or share their info on the site Mark there itself start earning the money your 1 Like on the advertisements on the Margins of the Facebook Mark charges the fees from the advertisers so basically we are the markers of him! Smart move isn't it? Facebook has tied up with more than 50 companies and startups! Most of them are most popularly used apps and startups. Like Instagram ,WhatsApp and many more. He believe to join all the great founders together! Now guess what ma(more)

How did Mark Zuckerberg manage to own 25% of Facebook?

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Patrick Mathieson

venture investor @ Toba CapitalGenerally speaking, these are the levers you can pull to minimize dilution during fundraising: * Don't raise a ton of money. * Negotiate a high valuation. * Wait until you can negotiate a high valuation to raise a ton of money (this is just restating the first two points). Let's see how this played out for Facebook using data that was helpfully organized by Dealbook: * Angel round (2004): $500k raised at a ~$5M cap, so +/- 10% dilution in exchange for sufficient funds to really begin developing & growing the platform. The team saves money by living/working together in a house in Palo Alto, taking pretty low or nonexistent salaries, et cetera. Good move. * Series A (2005): $12.7M raised at a ~$80M valuation, which is ~15% dilution.

How many hours a week does Mark Zuckerberg actually work at the Facebook office?

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Lee Byron

Worked at Facebook (company) (2008–2018)Originally Answered: Mark Zuckerberg, how many hours a week do you actually work at the Facebook office?

I sit near Mark at FBHQ so I'll speak from my experience.

He often arrives every morning before I do and is around after dinner working as well. I would say he is in the office roughly 9-10 hours a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes we have particularly exciting projects going on that have people volunteering their weekends and Mark might come by and see how things are going.

Mark occasionally travels and isn't in the office, but it seems like it's more likely that his appointments come to our headquarters than vice versa.

I should say that it's great to have him around with regularity and that he chooses to have the same desk set up as everyone else. He takes his job very seriously not just as a businessman but as a leader; he has helped keep our company culture what it is.

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What is it like to code with Mark Zuckerberg?

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Saket Pundlik

forever oldComing from a person with a non-coding background, it must be like: * Playing chess with Gary Kasparov * Acting with Marlon Brando * Singing with Frddie Mercury * Playing guitar with Jimi Hendrix * And most importantly, arguing with Sheldon Cooper First you will feel honoured, then you will be humbled.(more)

What kind of car does Mark Zuckerberg drive?

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Jason McHenry

Lives in Los Altos, CA

He is known to have a few but his daily driver is a black Volkswagen Golf MK6 GTI. He really ‘likes’ having dinner at Sumika in Los Altos and I see him ‘check in’ there kind of often.

And since he thinks it’s okay to play fast and loose with people’s private information I wonder how he’d feel if people were to, say, share a photo of his license plates or something? That’d probably not be very cool.

What are Mark Zuckerberg's strengths?

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Mohammed Raiyyan

looking for facebook internshipGreetings..!! Okay lets hop into the answer Zuck is likable & very friendly: Great posture in both the physical and philanthropic senses. Very intelligent yet seems down-to-earth and humble. Lacks at classic professionalism in day-to-day dressing but makes up for that with attitude and clean, neat clothing as well as good posture. Did I mention great posture? :) 1. He has a vision His vision was that of a more open and connected world. And throughout the growth of Facebook, he has stuck to his vision - that of a product that offers value while connecting people and building a world with more empathy. From the beginning, the frugal-living Zuckerberg was never in it for the money> He had a larger vision and not only thought ahead of where he wanted to take Facebook, but pushed himself and his te(more)

What is Mark Zuckerberg like in person?

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Marc Alessandro IV

Started an online business at 14 sold it 6 years later for an undisclosed amountJust like any other person. He doesn't talk about his wealth; money, cars, what have you. He's really down to Earth. He also doesn't really talk about business. We usually talk about mundane things, or about programming. It's also worth mentioning that I meet Zuckerberg in 08' 09'. It was a different world, but he was still very humble So in the end, he's just like you or me. He's just worth billions of dollars. I almost forgot he does talk alot about the books he is currently reading.  

What advice did Mark Zuckerberg and Dustin Moskovitz give Adam D'Angelo when he was leaving Facebook to start Quora?

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Manish Kumar Srivastav

Lives in Bengaluru, Karnataka, India (2012–present)

Spread knowledge.

The immense contribution and change that Quora has brought is lowering the communication gap between pizzled and achievers. Your questions can be directly answered by prominent people. I feel that's immensely helpful to society.4.1K viewsView 31 upvotes311

Why does Mark Zuckerberg have a 99% approval rating from his employees?

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Amir Memon·

Muslim, Software Engineer

Because he is just that awesome.

There are several reasons why we "approve" of him:

  • The story: He built this billion user and billion dollar company from his dorm room, overcame one obstacle after another, and assembled a company with some of the most talented employees in the world.
  • The principles: He is dead-focused on "making the world more open and connected." The guy doesn't waver; all the investments in R&D and acquisitions have been along these lines.
  • The heart: He was the biggest donor of 2013, and is generally a minimalist. He is clearly committed to Internet.org, even though that's not necessarily where the short term revenue increases are. We really feel he wants to change the world for the better.
  • The guts: What other CEO has the... guts... to purchase a chat company for $19B??? It's a very smart purchase for various reasons, but still, $19B! Even other Silicon Valley CEOs acknowledge Zuck's fearlessness: http://read.bi/1n24ctW
  • The wisdom: When we hear him speak, he gives us brain wrinkles. He has this uncanny ability to make all the right strategic moves, and when he explains the reasons for making those moves, it simply makes sense. Sure, mistakes have been made, and hindsight is 20/20, but at decision time, it was for all the right reasons.
  • The trust: He doesn't make all the decisions, in fact far from it. We feel entrusted and empowered to drive our features the way we feel is best for the people that use Facebook. This is drastically different from many top-down corporations. We're happy with the balance between management-mandated and grass-roots-inspired decision making.
  • The character: He wears T-Shirts and jeans, talks with humility, and he just seems generally very approachable. We like that.
  • The business: Facebook is a rock solid business that is rapidly increasing in revenue as we speak. It makes more than 70% more in revenue than it was making just one year ago.
  • The free food and perks: Yes, this makes us like him and the company too. He has the ability to put an end to it at any time, but he keeps it coming :-). If somebody gives me free cookies, I like them, this part is not rocket science.


And, no, having a lower approval rating is not a good thing. People don't "approve" because they agree with everything, rather they know that they have a say, and that their opinion matters. It's a good thing to like your boss.

What are some of the evil aspects of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Vlad Usatii

Created readproduct.com to help users connect and share.

Mark Zuckerberg is an amazing entrepreneur.

But there is a point that all entrepreneurs get to where their attitude gets in the way of innovation. Mark is one of the few CEOs who doesn’t care about other brands. He wants his brand to succeed, but no one else's.

He isn’t moral — this is evident in how he views the world, crushing competition with simply upping ad pricing and upping gig posts on international job boards. If a brand is getting in the way with Facebook, he will straight up buy the business and never look back.

If someone will crush innovation and expansion, it may as well be the guy that doesn’t allow others to compete or innovate alongside him.

If we look at Zuck’s upbringing, he wanted to be a psychologist. This meant that, growing up, Mark had his own view on morality and even created websites to showcase the human psyche and its drawbacks. He stole a revolutionary idea from the one guy who dreamed it all up, made its premise into his own, and even told reporters something along the lines of: ‘I simply used the idea and made it better, as it was heading nowhere in the hands of the former.’

Zuck was a nerd, and with most nerds, there may be a root problem at hand. It could be that they don’t believe their knowledge tree is good enough, that their knowledge may be halted by the immediate realization that they aren’t the best, or it could simply be an inferiority complex, held down by the heightened social standing that stands as a proxy before their actions. Zuck created more and more and never looked at his haters or competition; he stomped competition with unethical, but ‘legal’ behavior, and created a storm of confusion among the crowd.

Some hate him for the fact that he looks like a psychopath (and nothing else to back the claim), but they may implicitly — instinctually — feel some sort of distrust in him because they deserve to think so.

After all, instinct has brought us this far.

Maybe Zuck will change, but his businesses will never stop behaving this way — the community has already been shaped.

What were the highlights of Mark Zuckerberg's testimony to Congress?

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Liam Ryan

Studied Master MarinerThe Highlights! – Well there were quite a few. I think seeing the equivalent of a linguistic gymnastics routine that finished with a big “Fuck You” “Shit Happens” and “Get over It” was probably the winner. Now I must confess this is not something I would usually take an interest in, nor would I usually watch but I wondered if Mr. Zuckerberg was going to try and explain what happened and the reasons why or just issue hollow meaningless words that looked to all appearances to have the veneer of an apology with no admissions of any wrong doing, which, is exactly what we got. Mr. Zuckerberg was able to emotionally frame his words in terms of a lack of action by saying “But it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough” What a nice linguistic trick to cover-up of the theft of our personal data by Camb(more)

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Mark Zuckerberg

How much is the per-day income of Mark Zuckerberg?

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Jeff Wilsbacher

Bay Area Native and lifelong residentAs a founder, he doesn’t trade time for money like most folks. Instead, he gets “a piece of the action” and gets to arbitrage other people's work and other people’s money. He makes money by buying low (people time/work) and selling high (advertizing/attention), and by organizing that work and sales. His net worth is around 70 billion. Today (2019, November 11) He was born 12,959 days ago. So, every day that he’s been alive he’s “made” around $5,401,651.36 every day (on average) since being born. But that’s pretty deceptive since he could have not started Facebook and gone on to do non-arbitrage work like most of us. He started Facebook 2004, February 4 (5,754 days ago). Using that start date he’s made around $12,165,450.12 a day. But that too might be deceptive since Facebook went public on 20(more)

How much of Facebook does Mark Zuckerberg own?

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Nat Burgess

Lives in Seattle, WA

In this matter, control is more interesting that dollars. Facebook structured its public offering so that Mark Zuckerberg retained over 50% of the voting shares in the company. The result is that Zuckerberg owns a minority of the fully diluted total shares outstanding, but a majority of the voting shares. Investors are skeptical of this type of arrangement because increases their risk. As shareholders they take financial risk on the value of the shares, but do not have an opportunity to participate in governance. For an individual investor this might not be a meaningful issue, but for large institutions that rely on active (and sometimes hostile) investors to force companies to take action, this is a high-risk scenario. Facebook was considered valuable enough that investors were willing to take the risk at the point of the IPO. Facebook has outperformed the market, and has not been targeted by activist investors.

Facebook listed Class A shares in their IPO. As of June 30, 2020, 2.879 billion Class A shares traded on NASDAQ. Class A shares have one vote per share. Class B shares, which are not traded on any public exchange, have 10 votes per share. Mark Zuckerberg owns approximately 57.9% of the Class B shares. Another approximately 12.5% are held by close friends and allies.

Zuckerberg owns just over 400 million shares total, valued on Friday 9/11/20 at approximately $105 billion.

Ann Dolcher

What programming languages does Mark Zuckerberg know?

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Douglas Green·March 29, 2016Works at Gleim PublicationsAccording to what appears to be his TopCoder profile (mzuckerberg Profile | TopCoder), he is a third-level C++ programmer. I also found an interesting source FOUND: Mark Zuckerberg's Hacker-For-Hire Profile From 2002 where his areas of expertise were apparently listed on his RentACoder profile as "Visual Basic, VBscript, C, C++, Java, Javascript, and ASP". Presumable he also knows PHP/Hack from working at Facebook. I didn't find any mention of him knowing Python, though.(more)

How does Mark Zuckerberg earn money through WhatsApp, as it is free and doesn’t even have ads?

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Moez Chandani·May 2, 2017Management Consultant. I enjoy studying businesses.

He doesn't. At least not right now.

Whatsapp currently has no revenue source. It originally began with a subscription based model where users were charged $0.99 a year to use the service. However, that's not a sustainable business model. Most of its 1.2 billion users (especially in developing nations) won't pay this amount, and Whatsapp would risk being overtaken by competitors who might offer similar services for free. This business model was therefore ditched.

Further, Whatsapp has traditionally been very very serious about maintaining customer privacy. One of its founders (and the current CEO of Whatsapp) Jan Koum grew up in USSR in the 80's where the government monitored nearly every action of its citizens, and this experience led him to take privacy seriously.[1] Whatsapp doesn't store chats on its servers, and all chats are end-to-end encrypted. They do not sell information about users to third party advertisers and in all probability will not do so in the near future.

However, Facebook will monetize Whatsapp in some form in the future (after all it's paid $19 billion for the app). Whatsapp can borrow a few ideas from Tencent which is hugely successful & highly profitable in China. Here are some possible avenues:

a) Incorporate mobile payments: This is probably going to happen in the near future. There was a flurry of news last month that Whatsapp may incorporate a UPI based payment system in India[2] . Basically, imagine PayTM and Whatsapp being integrated into a single app. You can settle bills with your friends, pay for your Uber rides, and pay at restaurants using your Whatsapp account. Whatsapp would earn money via transaction charges which would be levied on businesses WeChat has a similar service called WePay which is quite popular.

b) Use it for customer support: Whatsapp could also serve as a customer support tool. This is also something that should happen in the near future. Facebook has stated that they would

…test tools that allow you to use Whatsapp to communicate with businesses and organizations that you want to hear from.That could mean communicating with your bank about whether a recent transaction was fraudulent, or with an airline about a delayed flight.

Nearly every app today has a chat based support system integrated in it. Imagine replacing all of these with a Whatsapp based customer support system where you can contact companies directly from Whatsapp. It would simplify the process significantly. It would also be more efficient than tagging companies in tweets and posting on their Facebook pages to get attention.

c) Use it as a business tool: Another possible use here would be targeted messaging. Businesses could send targeted advertising messages to users who have specifically allowed these businesses to contact them. This could act as a replacement to sending emails or app notifications to users. So Zomato could offer special discounts to users who have enabled this service by sending them a Whatsapp message or by using the recently added Status tab on the app. Or MakeMyTrip could inform users about its latest offers via a Whatsapp Status.

d) Mobile gaming : WeChat in China earns most of its revenue from games incorporated in the app. While I am personally skeptical about how successful mobile games in apps would be in other countries, it can certainly be an option worth exploring.

In summary, while Whatsapp earns limited to no revenue currently, there is enough scope in the app to generate revenues via value added services.

Footnotes

Setting the record straight

WhatsApp will reportedly launch peer-to-peer payments in India within 6 months

What was Mark Zuckerberg like in high school?

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Lee Zhen Fung

Came to write, stayed to work

Just your every day geek. But he was quite engrossed in coding and even at one point had a tutor to teach him.

However, before you go and start learning to code, note that coding today and yesterday were both very different. He programmed the first FB prototype in months. Every programmer has his own set of code directives or designs,just as every carpenter has his tools. Presently we have lots of languages like coffeescript, python and ruby which might produce a similar Facebook clone faster.

I think Facebook now has its own language, considering the many data logistical challenges it faces, which might not be easily overcome by conventional code languages.

When Mark Zuckerberg first began building Facebook, what were his strengths and weaknesses as a developer?

Andy Vraun

I have read extensively about Facebook although I haven't worked at FB .

Strengths

1.Product driven approach : When start-ups start getting noticed there is significant pressure from the investors to get a revenue model and for FB, it was surely advertising. But Zuckerberg was adamant that he needs to build a cool product above anything else and so revenue wasn't any of his focus.

2.Fantastic Web Programming skills: He had already built a few successful products on the web and had a good knowledge of both system programming (logs....etc) and web.

3. Belief in his Idea: He faced a huge backlash from the users who felt uncomfortable with the news feed. But Zuckerberg was adamant on not rolling it back, he felt it was basic to what FB really was and then now, it is in facebook's core.

Weaknesses

1. Poor communication Skills: If you are a developer or anything else poor communication is always bad. His handling of internal matters was poor.

2. Rigidity in his beliefs (Rude): FB had their employees wear cool jeans (Think for a 40 year old man) to make FB appear as a cool place. He insulted some investors which , to a guy of his exposure was unprofessional.

How did Mark Zuckerberg learn to run a 200 billion dollar company?

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Richard Garand

Studying reality to prepare for the testOriginally Answered: How did Mark Zuckerberg learn how to run a 200 billion dollar company?

There is no set of skills that guarantees you can run any large company (sorry, MBAs!).

The foundation is understanding what is important in that business. Mark Zuckerberg probably can't run Procter & Gamble or an airline because their priorities are very different and not what he is good at.

What makes him good at understanding Facebook's priorities? Probably a combination of:

  • His natural interests aligned with what ended up being important in Facebook
  • His experience testing other ideas prior to starting Facebook, and then running Facebook, showed him what users value and how they react
  • Facebook's dominance means the market is defined by its priorities to some degree, further making his ideas more valuable

Having that foundation, and spending a lot of time translating it into action, typically means that you will be among the most influential people in whatever position you choose to work (employee, speaker, author, entrepreneur, consultant, or anything else).

However that's not enough. It might work if you're on your own or running a 10-person company. To run a $200 billion company is far more challenging and requires some additional skills to support the points above (in theory, this is what an MBA is about).

At that size you will face pretty much every challenge imaginable except those not applicable to your company / industry -- for example Facebook's latest quarterly report shows that they aren't feeling the effects of an economic slowdown because of their constant growth, so they don't have to manage business cycles yet.

Although many people share some part of these challenges, the unique ones tend to involve leadership and influence. Internally the CEO has to make sure all the employees understand what they need to do without being able to talk to each of them. Externally the CEO has to represent the company with the image that supports it in different areas such as marketing, government policy, and recruitment.

On top of this the CEO has to avoid being isolated by their influence and power. It can actually be difficult to understand what's really going on with employees and customers when you get most of your information from people whose boss is a billionaire (and thus are more careful about what they say).

Every CEO of a large company had to learn these at some point. Mark Zuckerberg just put them into practice a little faster, and handled it very well.

There is only one way you can do that: with help from other people. This includes talking with CEOs in a similar position, having mentoring from investors or retired CEOs, and hiring people who are good at managing their area and making the most of it while contributing to the company's bigger goals.

It also takes a lot of personal skills since you will have to admit you are wrong often, manage your time effectively, and work well with many other people. Very good advisors and mentors can also help with these if you have a certain level of willingness to begin with.

Finally to put this all together it takes a very high level of drive. Although some of these things may seem to come naturally a lot of them will be difficult. Very few people are willing to put forth the level of effort over a long time that it takes to do this.6.2K viewsView 18 upvotes18

What time does Mark Zuckerberg go to bed?

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Sean Dean

Blogs about getting better sleep

Mark Zuckerberg famous sleeps very little and is a bit of a night owl. When he was programming about 10 years ago, he would keep 'programming hours' and stay up until 6 am or even 8am.

Mark Zuckerberg, photo taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Zuckerberg

Now, he has to keep more orthodox business hours so has to get up earlier as you point out. It is reported he only sleeps for five hours a night, so that would mean if he now gets up at 5 am, he would go to bed at 12 am.

Source: Amazing – 10 Successful People Who Hardly Sleep

Check this out if you're interested in becoming an entrepreneur

From where do Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg get their intelligence?

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Adam Pittenger·

CEO of Moved (moved.com). Building, learning, writing.

It's difficult to say that their intelligence from X, Y, or Z. It's not so black and white.

First - It's important to note that intelligence comes in many forms. Some people might say "Book Smarts vs Street Smarts" but that barely scratches the surface.

For example, looking at the guys mentioned in the question, it is largely regarded that Mark Zuckerberg is a superior technical talent than Steve Jobs ever was. Jobs, however, was an incredible marketer and public speaker; something Zuck has had to work on over the years. So, while Jobs' level of social and emotional intelligence was probably much greater than Zuck's, Mark is more capable of working with his team to come up with the best technical solution for his product.

So... who is smarter? As you can see, the line is blurred.

All of this leads to saying that: the general term of "intelligence" here is probably better defined as the sum of their "strengths".

Each has their own strengths (and weaknesses, of course) that have made them successful entrepreneurs. This can be writing code, negotiating a deal, developing a strategy, etc.


Now that we've framed this, the real question is..
"How did their strengths become such strengths?"

  • CURIOSITY.
    These guys are hungry for knowledge. Hungry to better themselves and and learn as much as they can. Read, read, read... and read some more. You'll soak in so much and retain more than you realize. Doing so will lead to "lightbulb moments" later on, as your brain starts to make connections that others don't.
  • PRACTICE.
    Like any sport or craft, you get better with experience. So you have to just go out there and do it. The more you do it, the better you become. Were any of these guys great CEOs from Day 1? No. They may have qualities that made them okay, but I'm sure they were better CEOs after Year 1, Year 2, etc.
  • NETWORK.
    Lean on others. Generally, unless they suck, the people around you will want to help. You should continue to build your network with smart, experienced people that you can trust. (Make sure you're helping them as well!) This creates a healthy back-and-forth where, given your lack of knowledge or experience in a certain area, you can tap your network to get some help and guidance.


As mentioned above, my response here barely scratches the surface of the much larger topic of "intelligence". It's a topic I love to explore and am constantly fascinated with at a personal level.

Ultimately, if you want to be an entrepreneur - go be one. If you want to be like those guys - work your ass off and do it.

Never stop learning. Never stop improving.

How intelligent is Mark Zuckerberg?

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Paul McDonnell

Director and Founder at AIGaming.com (2017–present)

How smart is Mark Zuckerberg?

Mark Zuckerberg is ridiculously, pretty much off the charts smart.

  • Learnt programming at a very young age when this was much harder to do.
  • Even at this young age was applying programming to interesting problems for example when he created a network connecting his dad’s dental office to his home office.
  • Launched Facebook when so many smart people were trying to do something similar and made a success of it without previous comparable business experience.
  • Possibly the most outstanding: buying Instagram for a price which most at the time assumed to be ridiculously over priced but has turned out to be just the opposite: Here’s why Facebook’s $1 billion Instagram acquisition was such a great deal
  • Continues to dominate the social media space after such a long time.

The breadth of skill this man has is what really gets me. He cannot be boxed into one category: there are many great software developers, but he is one whilst understanding user acquisition and retention like almost no one else.11.8K viewsView 17 upvotes171

Would you vote for Mark Zuckerberg if he ran for president?

What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg was born in India?

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Shubhi Agarwal

Voracious Reader and Super FoodieOriginally Answered: What would happen if Mark Zuckerberg were born in India?

Had Mark Zuckerburg been born in India, he would not have got into IITs, i guess. That's because just a very good interest and curiosity into computers or programming is definitely not a prerequisite to clear IITJEE. And what I have read about him, he would not have slogged for 2 years mugging up school and coaching curriculum for Phy, Cem and Math. So he would have been in a 2nd-3rd tier engineering college, or may have even taken a Humanities course.

Meanwhile he would have kept his curiosity getting the better of him, by learning from other sources on internet (having found his interest wavering to programming/hacking et al), and doing his self-study and experimentation. Probably, he would even have become an intern at a startup or an IT major. Given that, he would have developed on his computing skills on his own, he may even have got hired by the company.

Having partially learnt there by using their resources, and partially by his own mind, he would have created a similar (if not exactly same) prototype, and would have got support from his current employers to take it ahead. And in few years time (slower than the actual case), he would have slowly come into picture, with his own little startup.

India is full of such IT startups, where people started small, and slownly gained momentum. It would require longer than Harvard, but would not be an impossibility, given the guy's hunger to get something working for himself, by hook or by crook. :)

P.S. This is taking into picture the scenario, where Zuckerburg was born in an average middle class family and can afford a decent education.1.7K viewsView 4 upvotes42

Is Mark Zuckerberg really a visionary?

Syed Usama Ahmed

Indian in CanadaOriginally Answered: Is Mark Zuckerberg really that visionary?

Yes of course he is and any CEO would be to take his company to new heights and new platforms. He reveled his grand vision about For The Next 10 Years Of Facebook.

Mark Zuckerberg said that next year Facebook would be making a series of aggressive talent and ad-tech investments that would set it up for a successful future.

But that could mean Facebook's expenses increase up to 70%.

Zuckerberg also outlined his three-, five-, and 10-year plan for the company.

In summary, he wants to have multiple Facebook products — WhatsApp, Messenger, Search, Video, NewsFeed, Oculus, and Instagram — each connect 1 billion users. Once those have reached mass scale, then he'll start to aggressively monetize them.

He also wants to improve the advertising experience for brands, particularly on mobile. Facebook will be investing in ways to better target and measure campaigns through data. It wants to help brands measure online to offline sales conversions. Currently, advertisers spend only about 11% of their budgets on mobile, according to Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg, because the right tools aren't in place.

Finally, Facebook wants to build the next major computing platform, which Zuckerberg believes could be augmented reality and Oculus. He also wants to bring the internet to more people through Internet.org.

"We're going to prepare for the future by investing aggressively," Zuckerberg said.

"The strength of the business today is putting us in a strong position to invest in the future," Wehner added.

Here's the transcript of Zuckerberg's plan, Seeking Alpha:

On previous calls, you’ve heard me talk about our big company goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms. These goals are important for us and part of our foundation of our strategy for the next decade, but achieving these will involve many different efforts and steps along the way, some that will be achieved rapidly and others that are going to take longer.

So with that in mind, I’d like to run through our progress this quarter on the different efforts that we expect to deliver a lot of impact over the next three, five and 10 years.

Let's begin with our three-year goals. Over the next three years, our main goals are around continuing to grow and serve our existing communities and businesses and help them reach their full potential.

When you look at the size and engagement of our community, our progress remains very strong. 864 million use Facebook every day and across our core products, we continue to see huge engagement. For example around 700 million people now use Facebook Groups every month. Achieving this scale shows that we're delivering experiences for the way that people want to share and connect.

Another example is our progress on public content. Last quarter I talked about how we're working to connect people around important public moments and personalities on Facebook. This quarter we've continued to build on our results and there are now more than 1 billion interactions every week between public figures and their fans on Facebook.

The investments we have made in video have also played a big part here. This quarter we announced a new milestone for video on Facebook achieving 1 billion video views, a day of made of videos. During the summers the ice bucket challenge drew more than 10 billion video views by 440 million people which is a good sign of how far our video product has come.

Instagram has also made a lot of progress this quarter. In August, the Instagram team launched Hyperlapse, a standalone app for time lapse of videos on iOS. The team has also invested heavily in improving the speed and performance of Instagram on Android. This has helped drive Instagram's strong international growth which in some countries has achieved more than 100% year-over-year growth. Globally, people using Instagram now spend around 21 minutes a day on average using the app. This is a strong figure compared to the industry and a good sign that Instagram's strategy is on the right path. Our other big focus over the next three years is to continue to serving businesses well and creating a lot of value for marketers.

As our results show, our approach here is working. To continue delivering value for businesses, we work to improve the quality of ads and news feed by reducing low quality content and improving our targeting to show more timely and relevant content. We’ve also made some big advances in our ad tech, most importantly the launch of our new Atlas platform. Atlas offers marketers a lot of new capabilities to help reach people across devices, platforms and publishers as well as improving measurement in online campaign. We're very excited for the future of Atlas and Cheryl is going to talk more about this in a moment.

Next, let's talk about our strategy over the next five years. Over the next five years, our goals are around taking our next generation of services, Instagram, Messenger, WhatsApp and Search and helping them connect billions of people and become important businesses in their own right.

One big priority for us here is messaging. And continuing to build and grow Messenger and now WhatsApp as well as great services. This quarter we made an important change to our mobile messaging efforts by transitioning people to Messenger on iOS, Android and Windows Phone. We believe that this change allows us to offer a better and faster messaging experience on mobile, and our data shows that people who use Messenger, usually respond to messages about 20% faster.

This month we also completed our acquisition of WhatsApp. I'm excited to be working with this team and John to join our Board. WhatsApp continues to be on a path to connect more than 1 billion people around the world and we're going to be working into accelerate their efforts here. Another key part of our strategy is helping developers to build more great social experiences on our platform.

Over the next few years, our goal is to make Facebook a cross-platform platform that allows developers to build, grow and monetize their apps across every major mobile platform. We’ve continued to make good progress here. This quarter, we opened our audience networks to all developers and publishers, allowing over 1.5 million advertisers on Facebook to extend their campaigns across mobile and for developers to begin monetizing their apps.

We're also excited by the continued adoption of App Links, our deep-linking technology for mobile apps. App Links is now used by hundreds of apps across iOS, Android and Windows phone and in just the past six months, the developers have created links to more than 3 billion individual destinations in these apps.

Now let's talk about how we're approaching our goals over the next 10 years.For the next 10 years our focus is on driving the fundamental changes in the world that we need to achieve our mission, connecting the whole world, understanding a world with big leaps in AIs and developing the next generation of platforms, especially in computing.

This is a very big period, a very busy period for our efforts with Internet.org. In July we worked with Airtel to launch the Internet.org app in Zambia. This provides free data access to a set of basic internet services for health, education, employment and communication. The results from this are very encouraging. We've already heard a lot amazing stories about how people are using the internet to add value to their lives. We hope to bring Most Popular Websites & Email|Good Home Page|Top 500 Sites|The Internet.org app to many more countries soon.

Over the last few months, I've also travelled to several countries and met with policy makers, key distributors and people and communities that are coming online for the first time. Increasingly industry and governments are seeing expanding internet access as one of their core priorities. This is positive development for our work with Internet.org in our long-term goal of connecting everyone in the world.

Finally, let's talk for a minute about our progress of Oculus. As I've said before, with Oculus, we're making a long-term bet on the future of computing. Every 10 to 15 years, a new major computing platform arrives and we think that virtual and augmented reality are important parts of this upcoming next platform. This quarter, Oculus continued to make progress towards this vision.

In September, the first Oculus developer conference took place, where we announced a new prototype VR headset on the path of a consumer version of the Rift. We continue to see a lot of excitement in the developer community and we've now shipped more than 100,000 of Rift developer kit to over a 130 countries. It's still early for Oculus but we are encouraged to see the variety of apps and games being developed for this platform.

Internet.org and Oculus are just two of the huge opportunities ahead. Our efforts here will take longer to achieve their full impact, but we're going to continue preparing for the future by investing aggressively. So that’s how we’re approaching our strategy over the next three, five and 10 years, while focusing on our big goals of connecting everyone, understanding the world and building the next generation of platforms.

This has been a quarter with strong results. I want to thank the entire Facebook community, our employees, our partners and our stockholders for their continued support. Because of your contribution, Facebook continues to grow in strength and to create greater value in the world for people, partners and businesses. We have a long journey ahead, we’re on the right path and I'm excited about the progress that we’re making.